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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 1,088 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 615 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 368 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 312 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 272 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 217 3 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 201 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 190 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 170 2 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 163 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for W. H. F. Lee or search for W. H. F. Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Lee's West Virginia campaign. (search)
Lee's West Virginia campaign. General A. L. Long. Before proceeding with the operations in Northwestern Virginia, it will be necessary to glance at the condition of that section, and the previous military operations that had been carried on within its limits. This section of Virginia did not cordially coincide in the ordinanheard of a Pass about forty miles west, near Huntersville, by which Cheat Mountain might be turned. he sent Colonel Gilliam, with his own Virginia Regiment and Colonel Lee's Sixth North Carolina Regiment, being a force of about two thousand men, to occupy this Pass, and had ordered the remaining troops intended for the Army of Nortten's, and Savage's Tennessee Regiments, Campbell's Virginia Regiment, a battalion of Virginia regulars, four hundred strong, commanded by Colonel Munford, Major W. H. F. Lee's squadron of cavalry, and Marye's and Stanley's batteries of artillery. Colonel Gilliam was at Valley Mountain Pass, fifteen miles west of Huntersville,
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of fleet Wood. (search)
ckets on the upper Rappahannock, was, with the exception of the Fourth Virginia Cavalry, moved across the Hazel river. W. H. F. Lee's Brigade was stationed on the road to Welford's ford; Jones' Brigade on the road to Beverly's ford, and Robertson's Br checked until Hampton, with four of his regiments, took-position upon Jones' right, and a junction was effected with W. H. F. Lee's Brigade upon the left. At the earliest report of the enemy's advance, Robertson moved to the support of his picketsuestion of further pursuit of Gregg's Division was soon decided for us by General Buford, who made a heavy attack upon W. H. F. Lee's Brigade, upon our left, beyond the Barbour House, at the same time advancing with infantry and cavalry through the o repelling the last attack of Buford upon our left. The brunt of the battle was borne by the three brigades of Jones, W. H. F. Lee, and Hampton, and from the last one regiment was detached. Taking, therefore, General Gregg's statement, that the Un
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The right flank at Gettysburg. (search)
Town, Alger, Gray, and Mann, respectively, and Light Battery M, of the Second (regular) Artillery, commanded by Lieutenant A. C. M. Pennington. On the other hand, Stuart had with him, as he states in his report, Hampton's, Fitzhugh Lee's, and W. H. F. Lee's Brigades of cavalry, to which was added, for the proposed movements of the day, Jenkins' Brigade of cavalry armed as mounted infantry with Enfield muskets. This entire force has been estimated by reliable Confederate authority at between ss' squadrons of the Third Pennsylvania, behind a fence which was slightly retired from that occupied by the First New Jersey; but before the right could reach the more advanced fence occupied by the First New Jersey, a dismounted regiment from W. H. F. Lee's Brigade advanced in line to the support of the enemy's skirmishers, who were about to be cut off by the detachment sent out from Rummel's, and made a terrific onslaught along the line. Treichels and Rogers' squadrons of the Third Pennsylvan
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Gregg's cavalry at Gettysburg (search)
enemy, allowed themselves to be supplied with but ten rounds of ammunition, although armed with the most approved Enfield muskets. I moved this command and W. H. F. Lee's secretly through the woods to a position, and hoped to effect a surprise upon the enemy's rear. But Hampton's and Fitz Lee's brigades, which had been orderer two, were about to cut off and capture a portion of our dismounted sharpshooters. To prevent this, I ordered forward the nearest cavalry regiment (one of W. H. F. Lee's) quickly to charge this force of cavalry. It was gallantly done, and about the same time a portion of General Fitz Lee's command charged on the left, the Fily on the side of Gregg, it would seem, that the blindest prejudice alone could construe the victory to his opponent. Stuart describes the charge of one of W. H. F. Lee's regiments and a portion of Fitz Lee's command, including the First Virginia Cavalry, as very successful-the enemy's masses vanished before them like grain be