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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 1,088 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 615 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 368 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 312 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 272 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 217 3 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 201 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 190 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 170 2 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 163 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. H. F. Lee or search for W. H. F. Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.70 (search)
seemed to know where he was. 'Twas said that General Bushrod Johnson, on our left, was being beaten back, and was calling for aid; again that General Munford, with two cavalry brigades, had reinforced Johnson, and in turn was driving the enemy, &c. Joe Mayo came to my headquarters and complained that as far as he knew, there were no pickets in our front. I told him there were none from my command, but that I knew there were troops in our front, and I believed the enemy, but possibly General W. H. F. Lee's Brigade of Cavalry, as he had been operating with us the night before. Gloomy outlook. Mayo said that Ransom, on our left, was appealing for aid, but that in Pickett's absence no one would assume the responsibility of weakening his division. General Geo. H. Steuart (known as Maryland Steuart), the senior brigadier, refused the responsibility. I urged Mayo to throw a picket in our front; our men in the works had been on the march and battlefield continuously for forty hours,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Hanover Grays. (search)
ardson, Peter (dead). Short, William Neander. Smith, William H. (wounded and dead). Smith, William C. (killed near Ashland, Va.). Southard, John (wounded and dead). Snyder, Stephen (discharged; dead). Taliaferro, William (discharged; dead). Talley, George T. (discharged). Talley, John A. J. (killed at Sharpsburg). Talley, Ezekiel S. (killed at Sharpsburg). Talley, Walter (wounded and dead). Talley, Williamson (dead). Talley, Charles A. (dead). Talley, William E. Thacker, Philip (dead). Thomas, Richard A. Thomas, R. H. (dead). Timberlake, Junius (dead). Tomblin, John H. Tyler, Davis. Via, Andrew (discharged). Via, William H. Warren, James B. (dead). White, Lee (killed at Drewry's Bluff). Wicker, William (killed at Sharpsburg). Wright, George W. Wright, Gus. W. (wounded). Wright, Joseph (dead). Wright, Silas (dead). Wyatt, Charles. Wyatt, William (dead). From the Times-Dispatch, October 21, 1906.\
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), From Manassas to Frazier's Farm. (search)
From Manassas to Frazier's Farm. Recollections of a soldier in many Battles—General Lee to the rear. Sir,—I read in the Confederate Column of The TimesDis-patch some time ago Corporal Tom's article, in which he gave some intensely interesting accounts of his close calls and other experiences in the War of the Sixties.en the crisis had come at the first battle of Manassas, as already described, and also on the ever-memorable 12th of May, 1864, at Spotsylvania Courthouse, when General Lee offered to lead us to retake the works just after General Edward Johnson's Division was captured, of which the writer and many others have minutely described in the columns of The Times-Dispatch, for it seems that no other incident of the war has attracted more attention than that. Methinks that I can see General Lee yet, and hear the rebel yell, that was raised when his horse was led back and we charged, and, as in the charge at Manassas, we won. The night after the battle at Willia