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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 14 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 11 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Mortimer D. Leggett or search for Mortimer D. Leggett in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
George Hurlbut; F, 2d U. S., Lieut. Albert M. Murray, Lieut. Joseph C. Breckinridge, Lieut. Lemuel Smith, Lieut. Rezin G. Howell. Seventeenth Army Corps (joined the army in Georgia June 8th), Maj.-Gen. Frank P. Blair, Jr. Escort: M, 1st Ohio Cav. (relieved June 18th), Lieut. Charles H. Shultz; G, 9th Ill., Mounted Inf. (relieved July 24th), Capt. Isaac Clements; G, 11th Ill. Cav. (assigned Aug. 11th from escort of Fourth Division), Capt. Stephen S. Tripp. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Mortimer D. Leggett, Brig.-Gen. Charles R. Woods. Escort: D, 1st Ohio Cav. (relieved June 18th), Lieut. James W. Kirkendall. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Manning F. Force, Col. George E. Bryant: 20th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Daniel Bradley, Maj. George W. Kennard, Capt. John H. Austin; 30th Ill., Col. Warren Shedd, Lieut.-Col. William C. Rhoads, Capt. John L. Nichols; 31st Ill., Col. Edwin S. McCook, Lieut.-Col. Robert N. Pearson, Capt. Simpson S. Stricklin; 45th Ill. (detached at Etowah Bridge), Lieut.-C
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
y handled front was brought hither and put into the trenches, in order to make secure the right of Hood's line. The Bald Hill was an important outpost. The 21st, a fearfully hot day, was spent by all in readjustment. Thomas brought his three corps forward, near to the enemy. The gap in my lines was closed as we neared the city. Schofield filled the space between the Fourth (mine) and Logan's corps. McPherson, to get a better left, ordered Blair to seize Bald Hill. General Force, of Leggett's division, supported by Giles A. Smith, who now had Gresham's place, charged the hill and carried it, though with a heavy loss. No time ran to waste till this point was manned with batteries protected by thick parapets and well secured by infantry supports. Atlanta appeared to us like a well-fortified citadel with outer and inner works. After Thomas had beaten him, Hood resolved to give up the Peach Tree line; so, after dark, he drew back two corps into those outer works. Hardee, h
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Hood's second sortie at Atlanta. (search)
te line was intrenched almost within a stone's-throw of what was then called Bald Hill. That was a position which had been stubbornly fought for almost since General Leggett captured it, July 21st. It was the key to the situation, and was the point where an attack by Hood's forces was most likely to fall. General Leggett that niGeneral Leggett that night pleaded most earnestly to have his command relieved from duty at Bald Hill. His men, he said, were physically exhausted. They had been under almost constant fire for two days in such circumscribed limits that they were practically imprisoned in the trenches. General Logan answered that the entire army was worn — the Fifteenth Corps had been weakened, and had no reserves from which relief could be drawn; the Seventeenth Corps had been crushed, and was needed where it was. But General Leggett insisted that his men must be relieved; that it would be unwise to trust such an important point in the hands of men in such a condition as his command was; and Ge
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the campaign of the Carolinas. (search)
. F. Wood, Capt. David Gillespie; 25th Ind., Lieut.-Col. James S. Wright, Maj. William H. Crenshaw, Lieut.-Col. J. S. Wright; 32d Wis., Col. Charles H. DeGroat, Lieut.-Col. Joseph H. Carleton, Maj. William H. Burrows. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Mortimer D. Leggett, Brig.-Gen. Manning F. Force, Brig.-Gen. Mortimer D. Leggett. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Manning F. Force, Col. Cassius Fairchild, Brig.-Gen. Manning F. Force, Brig.-Gen. Charles Ewing: 20th Ill. (provost-guard of division to April 3dBrig.-Gen. Mortimer D. Leggett. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Manning F. Force, Col. Cassius Fairchild, Brig.-Gen. Manning F. Force, Brig.-Gen. Charles Ewing: 20th Ill. (provost-guard of division to April 3d), Capt. Henry King; 30th Ill., Lieut.-Col. William C. Rhodes, Capt. John P. Davis; 31st Ill., Lieut.-Col. Robert N. Pearson; 45th Ill., Maj. John O. Duer; 12th Wis., Col. James K. Proudfit; 16th Wis., Capt. Joseph Craig, Col. Cassius Fairchild, Capt. Joseph Craig, Col. Cassius Fairchild. Second Brigade, Col. Greenberry F. Wiles, Brig.-Gen. Robert K. Scott: 20th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Harrison Wilson; 68th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. George E. Welles; 78th Ohio, Capt. Israel C. Robinson, Col. G. F. Wiles, Lieu