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at the same time introducing her to that celebrated woman. She said it was one of the most pleasant evenings of her life, and she looked back upon it. with peculiar satisfaction, for she was then introduced to Mr. Madison, Mr. Monroe, Mr. Benjamin Watkins Leigh, and many others of the celebrated men of the day, who were attending the Convention. Could we then have looked through the vista of time, and have seen ourselves in this same city, the one looking for a cheap room in somebody's third m, surrounded by their children, who were the companions of my youth; also, their lovely grand-daughter, Mrs. W. H F. Lee, who passed away last winter, at an early age, while her husband was prisoner of war. Near them is the grave of the Hon. Benjamin Watkins Leigh; of Judge and Mrs. Stanard, and of their gifted son; of dear Mrs. Henningham Lyons and her son James, from whose untimely end she never recovered; of our sweet friend, Mrs. Lucy Green. Then there is the handsome monument of Mrs. Abr
mass of the voting population of nearly all these States had just given General Jackson their suffrages for the second or third time — they had long enough been told that he was a despot, an usurper, a tyrant, etc., without believing it; and they were little inclined to repudiate in a moment the convictions and the associations of a lifetime. In Virginia alone was there any official exhibition of sympathy with South Carolina in her self-invoked peril; and she sent a commissioner Benjamin Watkins Leigh. to that State rather to indicate her fraternal regard than to proffer any substantial assistance. There was some windy talk of opposing by force the passage of a Federal army southward through the Old Dominion on an errand of subjugation; and her Governor, John Floyd, father of the late John B. Floyd, Mr. Buchanan's Secretary of War. in his annual Message, said something implying such a purpose. Ex-Governor Troup, of Georgia, and a few other doctrinaires of the extreme State
Basis, resigned, and his seat was filled by Hugh B. Grigsby, of opposite views. At length, November 16th. the Convention came to a vote, on the proposition of a Mr. Green, of Culpepper, that the White Basis be stricken out, and the Federal Basis (the white inhabitants with three-fifths of all other persons ) be substituted. This was defeated — Yeas 47 (including Grigsby aforesaid); Nays 49--every delegate voting. Among the Yeas were ex-President Madison, Chief Justice Marshall, Benjamin Watkins Leigh, Philip P. Barbour, John Randolph of Roanoke, William B. Giles, John Tyler, etc. Among the Nays (for the White Basis) were ex-President Monroe, Philip Doddridge, Charles F. Mercer, Chapman Johnson, Lewis Summers, etc. As a rule, Western (comparatively Free) Virginia voted for the White Basis, with some help from the East; and it was computed that the majority represented 402,631 of Free Population, and the minority but 280,000. But the minority was strong in intellect, in numbers, a
tion to reject was defeated by a vote to receive the petition — Yeas 35, Nays 10, as follows: Yeas: Messrs. Benton, Brown, Buchanan, Clay, Clayton, Crittenden, Davis, Ewing of Illinois, Ewing of Ohio, Goldsborough, Grundy, Hendricks, Hill, Hubbard, Kent, King of Alabama, King of Georgia, Knight, Linn, McKean, Morris, Naudain, Niles, Prentiss, Robbins, Robinson, Ruggles, Shepley, Southard, Swift, Tallmadge, Tipton, Tomlinson, Wall, Webster, Wright. Nays: Messrs. Black, Calhoun, Cuthbert, Leigh, Moore, Nicholas, Porter, Preston, Walker, White. In the House, February 5, 1836. Mr. Henry L. Pinckney, of South Carolina, submitted the following resolve: Resolved, That all the memorials which have been offered, or may hereafter be presented to this House, praying for the abolition of Slavery in the District of Columbia, and also the resolutions offered by an honorable member from Maine (Mr. Jarvis), with the amendment thereto, proposed by an honorable member from Virginia (Mr.
orth, Kansas, outrages at, 239; 335. Leavitt, Judge, in case of Margaret Garner, 219. Lecompton, Kansas, Convention at, 240. Lecompton Constitution, the, submitted to a vote of the people, 249-50; finally rejected, 250. Lee, Col. (Union,) at Ball's Bluff, 623. Lee, Gen. Robert E., brings reenforcements against old Brown at Harper's Ferry, 293; takes command( of Rebel forces in Virginia, 518, commands in West Virginia, 525-6. Leeman, Wm. H., killed at Harper's Ferry, 292. Leigh, Benj. Watkins, Comm'r to S. C., 100; 110. Lesesne, Mr., of S. C., favors cooperation, 333. Letcher, John, his politics, etc., 225: his peculiar position as Governor of Virginia, 340; hastes to join the traitors, 342; calls his Legislature together, 348; his letters to L. P. Clover, of Ill., 397; considers New England past forgiveness, 438; his answer to the President's requisition, 459; 465; proclaims the adoption of the Confederate Constitution, 516; proclamation calling out the mil
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The wounding of Stonewall Jackson — extracts from a letter of Major Benjamin Watkins Leigh. (search)
The wounding of Stonewall Jackson — extracts from a letter of Major Benjamin Watkins Leigh. [The following extracts from a private letter of Major Leigh, who was then serving on General A. P. Hill's staff, have never been in print, and will be appreciated as sheding additional light on the events of which they treat.] camp near Hamilton's crossing, Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia, 12th May, 1863. * * * * * * * * * On Friday the 1st, D. H. Hill's, Trimble's and A. P. Hill's dMajor Leigh, who was then serving on General A. P. Hill's staff, have never been in print, and will be appreciated as sheding additional light on the events of which they treat.] camp near Hamilton's crossing, Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia, 12th May, 1863. * * * * * * * * * On Friday the 1st, D. H. Hill's, Trimble's and A. P. Hill's divisions — that is to say, all of Jackson's corps, except Early's division — marched from the vicinity of Hamilton's crossing to a point on the Plank road, about eight miles westward of Fredericksburg. Early's division was left to watch a body of the enemy who had crossed the Rappahannock at a point opposite to Hamilton's crossing, whilst the rest of the corps marched towards Chancellorsville, where the enemy's main force had been concentrated. The greater part of Anderson's and McLaws' divis<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--official reports. (search)
urg, where we remained until the following day in the hope that the enemy would give us battle on ground of our own selection. My loss in this terrible battle was heavy, including some of the most valuable officers of the command. Major J. W. Latimer of Andrews' battalion, the boy major, whose chivalrous bearing on so many fields had won for him a reputation to be envied by his seniors,--received a severe wound on the evening of the 2d, from the effects of which he has since died. Major B. W. Leigh, my Chief of Staff, whose concientious discharge of duty, superior attainments and noble bearing made him invaluable to me, was killed within a short distance of the enemy's line. Major H. K. Douglas, Assistant Adjutant-General, was severely wounded while in the discharge of his duties, and is still a prisoner. My orderly, W. H. Webb, remained with me after being severely wounded. His conduct entitles him to a commission. Fewer wounded from my division were left in the hands of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson — the story of his being an Astrologer refuted — an eye-witness describes how he was wounded. (search)
rest was furnished by Lieutenant Smith and Major Leigh. Extracts from the printed narrative mas in front opened with great violence, and Captain Leigh, who had just arrived with a litter, had h, and the latter, leaning his right arm on Captain Leigh's shoulder, slowly dragged himself along trom his wounded arm flowing profusely over Captain Leigh's uniform. Hill's lines were now in mot escort to dismount and accompany him, viz: Major Leigh, who, I believe, was then called Captain LeCaptain Leigh, and he ordered the rest to remain on their horses in the pike. He sent at once for Dr. Barr, was being borne off on foot, supported by Captain Leigh and one or two others, I walked between thgone for Dr. McGuire, Lieutenant Smith and Captain Leigh were left with General Jackson, and I supptime, as did other members of the staff and Major Leigh, who that night acted as aid-de-camp to Geniskey, after the first fall of the litter, Captain Leigh and the General's to aids, Lieutenants Smi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Artillery on the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
nt-Major Benjamin Karnes as having been in command of a section and having rendered excellent service. Captain Brown's battery was not engaged at any time. It is useless for me to speak of the commanders of the batteries engaged. Their known skill and gallantry, as proven on every battlefield, makes it unnecessary to speak of them on this particular occasion. I am, Major, very respecfully, your obedient servant, J. W. Latimer, Major commanding Andrews's Artillery Battalion. To Major B. W. Leigh, A. A. General Johnson's Division. Report of Major McIntosh. Headquarters McIntosh's battalion, Mitchell Station, July 30, 1863. Colonel:--I have the honor to submit the following report, as called for, of the operations of this battalion since leaving Fredericksburg, June 15, 1863. The command was moved from the latter place by way of Culpeper Courthouse, Front Royal, Shepherdstown, &c., to Cashtown, Penn., without incident worthy of special note. On the morning of Wedne
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. the wounding of Stonewall Jackson. (search)
atement of one who claims to have been one of the litter bearers who bore Jackson from the field, and who expressed the opinion that Jackson was wounded by the enemy, and not by his own men. We distinctly disavowed that idea, and said that the proofs were abundant that Jackson fell by the fire of his own men; but we ought, perhaps, to have pointed out those proofs a little more clearly. In Volume VI, pp. 230-234, Southern Historical Society papers, we published the narrative of Major Benjamin Watkins Leigh, of General A. P. Hill's staff. In same Volume, pp. 261-282, we published a paper by General Early in which he gives a letter from Captain Wilbourn, of Jackson's staff, who was with his chief at the time he was wounded. And in Volume 8, pp. 493-496, we printed General Lane's account of the affair. These statements are all perfectly conclusive, and show beyond all cavil, that our great chieftain was shot down by the fire of his own men, who would gladly have laid down their li
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