hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 23 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for John Lenthall or search for John Lenthall in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 3 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 12: fight between the Merrimac and Monitor, March 8, 1862. (search)
to the Navy Department: This is the strongest fighting vessel in the world, and can whip anything afloat. But when he returned to Washington a few days after he was laughed at by a high official, and a clever one at that: Why, man, he said, John Lenthall predicts that Ericsson's vessel will sink as soon as she is launched. Mr. Lenthall was unquestionably high authority, but he was certainly mistaken on this occasion. Like most others he looked upon the nondescript as a clever scheme to obMr. Lenthall was unquestionably high authority, but he was certainly mistaken on this occasion. Like most others he looked upon the nondescript as a clever scheme to obtain money from the government, but he subsequently did ample justice to Ericsson and built many vessels after the distinguished inventor's models, which for a time placed the United States Government ahead of all other naval powers. We did not long maintain this position however, for our statesmen do not appreciate the necessity of a navy sufficient to protect our extensive coasts and sixty millions of people, so we have fallen back into our original condition, without a single iron-clad that
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 32: Navy Department.--energies displayed.--building of iron-clads (search)
ards introducing iron-clads into the Navy. Mr. Lenthall Chief-constructor. Mr. Isherwood Chief of . The chief constructor of the navy, Mr. John Lenthall, at first condemned the Monitor in toto,ard in advocating this class of vessel. John Lenthall, chief of Bureau of construction. To sments were full of work to overflowing. Mr. John Lenthall, a constructor of the highest order, wasstimated. On a requisition from Mr. Fox, Mr. Lenthall designed the double-enders, with their heavy-boat going from slip to slip. And when Mr. Lenthall was notified that the Confederates were hav these did actually destroy the Alabama. Mr. Lenthall also designed those large ships-of-war of o did the machinery of all others planned by Mr. Lenthall. Mr. Lenthall could not at first be madeMr. Lenthall could not at first be made to admit that a vessel of the Monitor's build could be made efficacious for war purposes, or live i he had any confidence in the former. Then Mr. Lenthall's ideas underwent a radical change, and whi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 38: review of the work done by the Navy in the year 1863. (search)
n endeavoring to violate the blockade. It will be noticed that the additions to the Navy comprised vessels of the most formidable kind, and far more powerful than those of European navies. It is due to history to state that this addition to the Navy was owing the energy and ability of Mr. G. V. Fox, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, who had the supervision of all improvements and additions of ships, Mr. Welles wisely approving all his suggestions; while the able Chief Constructor, Mr. John Lenthall, brought all his ability to bear on the models of the vessels, and Mr. B. F. Isherwood, the talented Chief of the Bureau of Steam Engineering, devised the engines, which, even to the present day, have scarcely been equalled. The consequence of all this was that Governments disposed to be meddlesome failed to interfere when they saw that the Republic was not only determined to crush the Rebellion, but to resent any outside interference. The year 1864 opened hopefully for the succe