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e any dependents remain unprovided for. McClellan has attained his present flattering position by falsehood, and will seek to maintain it in the same manner. Falsehood is their settled plan of action. You remember the column of lies that appeared after Manassas, Leesburgh, etc. They have the most fertile imaginations of any race on the globe, and could battles be fought on paper, and with woodcuts, instead of powder and sabre-cuts, the Herald, Times, Tribune, together with Harper's and Leslie's illustrated papers, would settle the business in gallant style. Their illustrations are certainly the most extraordinary productions of the age; it suits the multitude, pays well, no doubt, and that is all any of them care for — they would squeeze a dollar until the eagle howled. I think the prisoners we took, said the major, could give a version of Seven Pines rather different from that published by McClellan. When Stone failed, and Baker fell at Leesburgh, McClellan was indi
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 18: (search)
valuable when, the same evening, we learned by telegram that Lawley would arrive the following day with two of his countrymen, the Marquess of Hartington and Colonel Leslie, both members of the British Parliament, on a voyage of inquiry, who intended to honour us with a visit. The preparations for their reception were rapidly may tent, enlivened with Sweeney's songs and banjo-playing to negro dances; and a monster egg-nogg was prepared, in the mixing of which even Lord Hartington and Colonel Leslie lent their inexperienced hands in beating up the eggs — a part of the preparation, by the way, which requires no little skill, and is, moreover, intensely lae rest. Accordingly Lord Hartington and Lawley might at one time be seen, their sleeves rolled up, busily washing their pocket-handkerchiefs, and not far off Colonel Leslie energetically at work with a huge pole beating up a heap of mud to a proper temper for the construction of a new chimney to Major Fitzhugh's tent. The day fo
, 1863. A letter this morning from Sister M., who has returned to her home on the Potomac. She gives me an account of many excitements to which they are exposed from the landing of Yankees, and the pleasure they take in receiving and entertaining Marylanders coming over to join us, and others who go to their house to bide their time for running the blockade to Maryland. Among others, she says, we have lately been honoured by two sprigs of English nobility, the Marquis of Hastings and Colonel Leslie of the British army. The Marquis is the future Duke of Devonshire. They only spent the evening, as they hoped to cross the river last night. They are gentlemanly men, having no airs about them; but my lord is excessively awkward. They don't compare at all in ease or elegance of manner or appearance with our educated men of the South. They wore travelling suits of very coarse cloth — a kind of pea-jacket, such as sailors wear. As it was raining, the boots of the Colonel were worn ov
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Mr. Mason's manners. (search)
Mr. Mason's manners. what are good manners? What is politeness as distinguished from rusticity? Miss Leslie has written a little elementary book intended to teach our Yankee girls how to behave themselves everywhere — in the church, in the drawing-room, in the railwaycar, and at the table d'hote. Mons. de Meilhauval has also compiled a Manuel du Scavoir, which is said to be a great polisher, but we have never seen it, and therefore, for all the good Monsieur might have done for us, we remain in our original ursine condition. But if we have books for brides and bridegrooms, with treatises upon every manner of incoming and outgoing, incident to human life; if we have complete letter-writers and vade-mecums for all kinds of persons, why should not our ministers plenipotentiary and our embassadors extraordinary have a manual of as much authority as that of General Scott is with infantry? Why should they not be taught to go through their paces, their genuflexions, their advance
at Charleston, 336. Collamer, Jacob, of Vt., 308; at Chicago, 321 Collinsville, Conn., John Brown contracts for a thousand pikes at, 283. Colorado Territory, organized, 388. Columbia, Pa., fugitive-slave case at, 216. Columbia, S. C., Legislature convenes at, 330; Chesnut's speech at, 331; Boyce's 332; Ruffin's. 335. Columbus, Christopher, implicated in the Slave-Trade, 26; discovers cotton in the West Indies, 57. Columbus, Ohio, President Lincoln at, 419. Combs, Gen. Leslie, of Ky., letter to, 343-4; 492. Comet, the brig, lost, with cargo of slaves, 176. Concord, N. H.. pro-Slavery mob at, 127. Congregationalists, the, and Slavery, 119. Connecticut, slave population in 1790; troops furnished during the Revolution, 86; 37; first Abolition society in, 107; 108; diminished Republican majority in, 300; Buckingham reflected in, 326. Conner, James, resigns at Charleston, 336. Conway, Gov. Elias W., of Ark., 341. Cook, Capt., routed at Camp Col
First catch the Rabbit.--Ole Dabe threatens to bun Baltimore if the railways leading to Washington be obstructed. Hadn't he better get Baltimore before he burns it? Ole Dabe ought to consult Miss Leslie's recipe for hare soup--first catch the hare, &c.--N. O. Delta, April 26.
ity, had the satisfaction of aiding in the contribution of six or seven thousand dollars to helping along the illy paid rebel soldiers. All the Adjutant-General's official papers fell into the hands of the enemy, who must possess pretty accurate knowledge respecting the cavalry division. Rebel soldiers who have been taken prisoners, report that one of their number got two thousand dollars in greenbacks, and that the blankets and hard-tack were very acceptable. Mr. Bonwill, the artist of Leslie's Illustrated, lost, among his private papers, numerous sketches that had been accumulating for a long period, and which he prized very highly. The Herald correspondent lost a silver bugle, recently taken from a captured rebel bugler, which he intended to send to Mr. Bennett as a trophy. The Tribune correspondent, Mr. Wells, lost his good clothes and other fixins. Colonel Brisbin, of General Lee's staff, lost some five hundred dollars' worth of clothing and money, together with the sash w
the latter, and fell back precipitately before our cavalry could come up with it. We captured a few prisoners. Russell's division was across by nine A. M., and intrenched itself on the hills. Meantime the main body of the army had also recrossed the North Anna, and was marching over the road toward the Pamunkey. All the corps had orders to recross after nightfall, leaving our pickets in front of the line until midnight. The three brigades of Crittenden's division, commanded by General Leslie and Colonels Marshall and Robinson, were ordered to take a stand on the north bank at Oxford, Quarles,and Jericho fords, respectively, and hold them until our pickets came on and take up and destroy the bridges. This they did successfully. It was a dark and rainy night, but no confusion prevailed, nevertheless, and at midnight all the infantry, artillery, and the headquarters trains were across. The pickets were then called in, but in the darkness some lost their way and fell into t
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), General Grant's headquarters, near Hanovertown, south bank of the Pamunkey May 29, (search)
the latter, and fell back precipitately before our cavalry could come up with it. We captured a few prisoners. Russell's division was across by nine A. M., and intrenched itself on the hills. Meantime the main body of the army had also recrossed the North Anna, and was marching over the road toward the Pamunkey. All the corps had orders to recross after nightfall, leaving our pickets in front of the line until midnight. The three brigades of Crittenden's division, commanded by General Leslie and Colonels Marshall and Robinson, were ordered to take a stand on the north bank at Oxford, Quarles,and Jericho fords, respectively, and hold them until our pickets came on and take up and destroy the bridges. This they did successfully. It was a dark and rainy night, but no confusion prevailed, nevertheless, and at midnight all the infantry, artillery, and the headquarters trains were across. The pickets were then called in, but in the darkness some lost their way and fell into t
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
28, ‘65 at Hatchers Run. Learnard, Walter A., priv., (F), Mar. 17, ‘64; 22; M. O. June 30, ‘65; drafted. Leonard, Geo. H., priv., (B), Jan. 23; 14; N. F.R. Leonard, John J., priv., (B), Apr. 4, ‘62; 32; wounded June 25, ‘62; disch. disa. Mar. 29, ‘64 Leonard, Michael, priv., (G), Aug. 19, ‘61; 21; wounded Sept. 17, ‘62; transf. to V. R.C. Sept 12, ‘63. Leppiere, Jean, priv., (G), Jan. 5, ‘65; 20; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Lentz, Frederick, priv., (G), Jan. 9, ‘65; 35; deserted Mar. 25, ‘65. Leslie, James, priv., (I), Aug. 3, ‘63; 28; sub. John L. Clapp; transf. to 20 M. V. Jan. 14, ‘64. Leverance, Charles, priv., (F), Aug. 4, ‘63; 30; sub. Jos. A. Stubbs; deserted Aug. 20, ‘63, Morrisville. Lewin, Chas. H., priv., (F), Mar. 30, ‘64; 21; abs. pris. died Aug. 28, ‘64 Andersonville, Ga. Le Villian, Ferdinand, priv., (G), Jan. 30, ‘65; 29; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Lewis, Albert H., priv., (D) Aug. 15, ‘61; 28; disch. Mar. 12, ‘64 at Washington, D.
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