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the latter, and fell back precipitately before our cavalry could come up with it. We captured a few prisoners. Russell's division was across by nine A. M., and intrenched itself on the hills. Meantime the main body of the army had also recrossed the North Anna, and was marching over the road toward the Pamunkey. All the corps had orders to recross after nightfall, leaving our pickets in front of the line until midnight. The three brigades of Crittenden's division, commanded by General Leslie and Colonels Marshall and Robinson, were ordered to take a stand on the north bank at Oxford, Quarles,and Jericho fords, respectively, and hold them until our pickets came on and take up and destroy the bridges. This they did successfully. It was a dark and rainy night, but no confusion prevailed, nevertheless, and at midnight all the infantry, artillery, and the headquarters trains were across. The pickets were then called in, but in the darkness some lost their way and fell into t
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), General Grant's headquarters, near Hanovertown, south bank of the Pamunkey May 29, (search)
the latter, and fell back precipitately before our cavalry could come up with it. We captured a few prisoners. Russell's division was across by nine A. M., and intrenched itself on the hills. Meantime the main body of the army had also recrossed the North Anna, and was marching over the road toward the Pamunkey. All the corps had orders to recross after nightfall, leaving our pickets in front of the line until midnight. The three brigades of Crittenden's division, commanded by General Leslie and Colonels Marshall and Robinson, were ordered to take a stand on the north bank at Oxford, Quarles,and Jericho fords, respectively, and hold them until our pickets came on and take up and destroy the bridges. This they did successfully. It was a dark and rainy night, but no confusion prevailed, nevertheless, and at midnight all the infantry, artillery, and the headquarters trains were across. The pickets were then called in, but in the darkness some lost their way and fell into t