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erry and at the Gosport Navy Yard, gave ample reason for such belief, and whereas, under such circumstances, sundry vessels in the waters of the James river, the Rappahannock, York, and Potomac Rivers and their tributaries, have been seized and detained by the authorities of the State, or offices acting under patriotic motives without authority, and it is proper that such vessels and property should be promptly restored to the masters in command, or to the owners thereof. Therefore. I. John Letcher,Governor of the Commonwealth, do hereby proclaim that all private vessels and property so seized or detained, with the exception of the steamers Jamestown and Yorktown, shall be released and delivered up to the said masters or owners. Proper officers of the State Navy have been assigned to each of the river, herein mentioned, with orders to release such vessels and property, and give certificates for damages incurred by the seizure and detention. I felt it my duty, furthermore, to
The Daily Dispatch: June 17, 1861., [Electronic resource], The vote on the Ordinance of Secession. (search)
on of the result, stating therein the aggregate vote for and against the ratification, and, whereas, the returns of several counties have not been received, and of others cannot be obtained, in consequence of the presence of a hostile force in the Northwestern and of the blockade in the Eastern portions of the State, and by the returns which have been received, it appears that an over whelming majority of the people have voted for the ratification of the said ordinance. Now, therefore, I. John Letcher, Governor, in pursuance of the authority so given, do hereby proclaim the aggregate vote aforesaid to be as follows: for ratification125,950 for rejection20 majority for ratification105 and to the end that the entire vote of the State, as far as it can be ascertained, may be known to the people, I have estimated the vote of the Counties from which returns have not been received, taking the same from the local papers and from sources believed to be correct or nearly so,
By the Governor of Virginia. --A Proclamation.--Whereas, a vacancy has occurred in the House of Delegates of this State by the resignation of G. L. Brown, Esq., late the Delegate from the county of Bedford; Now, therefore, I. John Letcher, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, have thought proper, by a writ of election, issued and directed pursuant to law, to require an election to be held at the several places of voting in said county, on the Twenty- Seventh day of the present month, (December,) for a member of the House of Delegates for said county, to supply the vacancy aforesaid. Given under my hand as Governor, and under the Less Seal of the Commonwealth, this 18th day of December, 1860. John Letcher. By the Governor: Geo. W. Munford, Sec'y of the Commonwealth. de 20--d&ctde
No Firing. --A party of citizens applied to Gov. Letcher yesterday for the use of one or more cannon, with which to fire one hundred guns in honor of the secession of South Carolina. The Governor declined the use of the guns, remarking that it had not been customary to loan State arms to fire partizan salutes.
By the Governor of Virginia. --A Proclamation.--Whereas, a vacancy has occurred in the house of Delegates of this State by the resignation of G. L. Brown, Esq., late the Delegate from the county of Bedford: Now, therefore, I. John Letcher, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, have thought proper, by a writ of elation, issued and directed pursuant to law, to require an election to be held pursuant to law, to require an election to be held at the several places of voting in said county, on the twenty-Seventh day of the present month, December, of a member of the House of Delegates for said county, to supply the vacancy aforesaid. Given under my hand as Governor, and under the Less Seal of the commonwealth, this 18th day of December, 1860. By the Governor: John Letcher. Geo. W. Munford, Sec'y of the Commonwealth. de 20--d&ctde
of the Cross on the Southern banner is eminently fitting. I have embodied the idea in an article for an other journal. Every Congressman who could get away is gone. No strangers are here during these distracted times. The Pittsburg row, which promised to be the battle of Lexington of the second revolution, has ended in smoke. So you may imagine how dull we are to-day. The few Southern members who remain manifest some anxiety to know the limits of the Middle Confederacy which Gov. Letcher advocates in his forthcoming Message, according to a dispatch in the Herald. If he means to cut off New England on the one side and the Gulf States on the other, it strikes me it will be like lopping off the roots and then the branches of a tree — a proceeding which would hardly enure to the benefit of the trunk. Hon. Charles L. Scott's able letter to his constituents, printed in a recent issue of the Constitution, shows how true the sons of Virginia are to their native State, and pr
By the Governor of Virginia.--a Proclamation. --Whereas, a vacancy has occurred in the Senate of Virginia, by the death of Frederick W. Coleman, late the Senator representing the district of the counties of Spots, and Caroline; Now therefore, I. John Letcher; Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, have thought proper, by writs of election, issued and directed pursuant to law, to require an election to be held at the several places of voting in said Senatorial District, on the Seventh day of January, 1861, for a Senator for said District to supply the vacancy aforesaid. Given under my hand as Governor, and under the Less Seal of the Commonwealth, this 26th day of December, 1860. John Letcher. By the Governor; Geo. W. Munford, Sec'y of the Commonwealth. de 23--swtde
.]Senate. Tuesday, Jan. 15, 1861. Called to order at 12 o'clock. Prayer by Rev. Mr. Minnegerode, of the Episcopal Church. A communication was received from the House announcing the passage of a resolution by that body inviting the members of the Senate to assemble in the Hall of the House of Delegates at 1 o'clock to-day, for the purpose of receiving the Alabama Commissioners. Accepted and communicated back to the House. Pardons and Reprieves.--A communication from Gov. Letcher relative to reprieves, pardons, &c. was received, and, on motion, laid upon the table and ordered to be printed. Bills Reported.--By Mr. Coghill, from the Committee of Courts of Justice, to compensate jurors serving on inquests in the counties of New Kent, Charles City, James City, York, Warwick, and Elizabeth City, and also the cities of Williamsburg and Norfolk. The rules were suspended, and the bill passed to its third reading. Resolutions of Inquiry.--The following resoluti
The Legislature. The Senate yesterday received and laid on the table a message from Governor Letcher, announcing the number of his pardons, reprieves, &c., during last year. A resolution was offered to inquire into the expediency of relieving the Asylums of this State from certain harmless and incurable patients. A joint resolution was offered, which under the rules lies over, requesting the President of the United States to inform the Governor of Virginia the object of the Federal Government in sending reinforcements to the forts and arsenals of Virginia, and whether, in his opinion, the object of the erection of said forts, &c. --the defence of the property of Virginia — is likely to be realized thereby. The Joint Committee on State and Federal Relations presented a report, (printed in the Dispatch yesterday,) which was ordered to be printed. In the House, resolutions were introduced for establishing the Richmond and Liverpool Packet Company, and for establishing a scho
o offer resistant with the energy and power necessary to ensure success. If required, we shall rely upon the ender force of the residue of the State Every man that can bear arms, must in turn give his willing assistance. Never in the history of nations has a people so eagerly and promptly met every call upon them No man will cease his efforts now until we have been crowned with victory. Now, therefore, in conformity with the requisition of the President of the Confederate States, I. John Letcher, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, by the authority vested in the Executive by law, do hereby require the regiments of the counties designated in the list hereto annexed, to assemble forthwith at the several places specified, in the most prompt and efficient manner. Under this call, every field officer, in the counties designated, will immediately call out each company remaining in his regiment not heretofore ordered; and where, from any cause, companies have been diminishe
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