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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Letcher or search for John Letcher in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
and her escort, and, stopping a day in Richmond, procured from Governor Letcher a supply of blankets and camp equipage, consisting of camp-ket. P. Benjamin, John C. Breckinridge, William Mahone, H. A. Wise, John Letcher, William Smith, Jubal A. Early, James Longstreet, William H. Payed for the purpose: R. E. Lee, James A. Seddon, C. .B. Duffield, John Letcher, G. Wythe Munford, John B. Baldwin, Charles E. Wortham, and Thomlso just caused the Virginia Military Institute, the house of Governor Letcher, and numerous other houses in the Valley, to be burned. Even r at the Virginia Military Institute, at Lexington, whereupon, Governor Letcher, apprehending the tremendous loss to the Confederacy by Jackson the Governor. The last entry in this interesting book is to Governor Letcher, of Virginia, and says: This will be handed you by my confidenent it. Arms for Maryland. In response to this appeal, Governor Letcher, of Virginia, sent the following telegram on April 22d: Major-
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
March, 1868, a new indictment was found against the prisoner, charging him in many counts with many acts of treason, conspicuous amongst which was conspiring with Robert E. Lee, J. P. Benjamin, John C. Breckinridge, William Mahone, H. A. Wise, John Letcher, William Smith, Jubal A. Early, James Longstreet, William H. Payne, D. H. Hill, A. P. Hill, G. T. Beauregard, W. H. C. Whiting, Ed. Sparrow, Samuel Cooper, Joseph E. Johnston, J. B. Gordon, C. F. Jackson, F. O. Moore, and with other persons whly, unlawfully, maliciously and wickedly. The various historic acts styled crimes, in this lengthy document, were proved before the grand jury by the following witnesses summoned for the purpose: R. E. Lee, James A. Seddon, C. .B. Duffield, John Letcher, G. Wythe Munford, John B. Baldwin, Charles E. Wortham, and Thomas S. Hayward. On the finding of this indictment the trial was continued until the 2d day of May, 1868, then to the 3d day of June, and then again until the fourth Monday in No
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of the history Committee (search)
residences of Andrew Hunter, Esq. (then a member of the Senate of Virginia, who had prosecuted John Brown, as Commonwealth's Attorney of Jefferson county, Va.); of Alexander R. Boteler, Esq. (an ex-member of the Confederate and United States Congresses), and of Edmund J. Lee, Esq. (a relative of General Lee), with their contents, only time enough having been given the ladies to get out of these houses. General Hunter had also just caused the Virginia Military Institute, the house of Governor Letcher, and numerous other houses in the Valley, to be burned. Even General Halleck, writing to General Sherman on September 28, 1864, refers thus to this conduct of Hunter. He says: I do not approve of General Hunter's course in burning private houses or uselessly destroying private property. That is barbarous. * * (See 2 Sherman's Mem., page 129.) No soldier in the Confederate army understood better than General Early the rules of civilized warfare, or was more opposed to vandali
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Maryland Confederates. (search)
ses. Moreover, intensely cold weather ensued, with rain and snow, his men were mostly without suitable clothing to protect them, and, hence, suffered terribly. During this movement Jackson issued an order to General Loring, which Loring disregarded. A contention followed which resulted in the Confederate War Department sustaining Loring. Jackson promptly indicated his intention to resign his commission and retake his chair at the Virginia Military Institute, at Lexington, whereupon, Governor Letcher, apprehending the tremendous loss to the Confederacy by Jackson retiring from the field, prevailed upon the Richmond authorities to reconsider their decision. The next order from Jackson to Ashby, April 16, 1862, occurred between the time Jackson fought Shields at Kernstown, March 23, 1862, and his defeat of Milroy at McDowell, May 8, following. Returning swiftly to the Valley of Virginia, Jackson prepared to pursue the campaign, which resulted in the quick and successive defeats o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.12 (search)
Brigadier-General T. H. Holmes, Fort Caswell: My confidential aide, Mr. Winslow, will hand you this letter. He will report to me any suggestions you have to make regarding the public defence. I recommend him to the attention of yourself and the commandant of Fort Macon. The same day a letter was written Marshall Parks at Norfolk, saying Winslow would call on him and give a verbal reply to a letter which Parks had written the Governor. The last entry in this interesting book is to Governor Letcher, of Virginia, and says: This will be handed you by my confidential aide, Hon. W. Winslow, who will have communication with you upon public matters of interest to our respective governments. He is charged, also, with a request to you to supply us with such cannon as you may have to spare and may be desirable to us. note.—It will be seen that the State had up to April 23d 30,000 rifles (Springfields, calibre 58, mainly), seized in the Fayetteville arsenal; there were 2,000 in the hand
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), How Virginia supplied Maryland with arms. (search)
H. Stewart, commanding the troops in Baltimore, appealed at once to Virginia for arms, in a letter sent by L. P. Bayne and J. J. Chancellor, who, in delivering it said: The people of Baltimore and the citizens of Maryland, generally, were united in at least one thing, viz: that troops volunteering for Federal service against Virginia or other sister Southern States, should not pass over the soil of Maryland if they could prevent it. Arms for Maryland. In response to this appeal, Governor Letcher, of Virginia, sent the following telegram on April 22d: Major-General Kenton Harper, in command at Harpers Ferry, is hereby ordered to deliver to General Stewart, at Baltimore, 1,000 of the arms recently taken at Harpers Ferry. On the same day, at the recommendation of the Governor, the Advisory Council of the State of Virginia agreed to loan the State of Maryland 5,000 more arms from the arsenal at Lexington, Va. The dispatch, arriving late that night, was given me as one of General H
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.50 (search)
cheering, Guard old valor to the grave. War officers of the First regiment Virginia volunteer infantry, With some notice of the Advisory Council of Governor John Letcher in 1861. I am indebted to my friend Captain Louis Zimmer, of the Ordnance Department, C. S. A., now of New York city, but a former comrade in F company,ice Episode,Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. XXVIII, pp. 14-18. Zimmer was entrusted by the Advisory Council of War, which in 1861 was composed of Governor John Letcher, Lieutenant-Governor Robert L. Montague (father of our present Executive); Commodore Matthew Fontaine Maury, State Senator Thomas S. Haymond (later of Westor-General) Francis H. Smith, Superintendent Virginia Military Institute, Captain Robert B. Pegram, C. S. Navy, and perhaps others. The private secretary of Governor Letcher, Colonel S. Bassett French, acted as Secretary of the Board. Of the proceedings of this Board of War, so able in its constitutional personnel, and which wou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War officers of the First regiment Virginia volunteer infantry, (search)
War officers of the First regiment Virginia volunteer infantry, With some notice of the Advisory Council of Governor John Letcher in 1861. I am indebted to my friend Captain Louis Zimmer, of the Ordnance Department, C. S. A., now of New York city, but a former comrade in F company, volunteers of Richmond, for the followinice Episode,Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. XXVIII, pp. 14-18. Zimmer was entrusted by the Advisory Council of War, which in 1861 was composed of Governor John Letcher, Lieutenant-Governor Robert L. Montague (father of our present Executive); Commodore Matthew Fontaine Maury, State Senator Thomas S. Haymond (later of Westor-General) Francis H. Smith, Superintendent Virginia Military Institute, Captain Robert B. Pegram, C. S. Navy, and perhaps others. The private secretary of Governor Letcher, Colonel S. Bassett French, acted as Secretary of the Board. Of the proceedings of this Board of War, so able in its constitutional personnel, and which wou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
monument to, 33; Hon. Wm., 33. Johnston, General J E., Orders of, 133, 280. Jones, D. D., Rev. J. Wm., 127. Kennon's Landing, Attack on, 141. Lane's Brigade, General J. H., 333. Ledbetter, M. T., 354. Lee, General, Fitzhugh. 142. Lee, General R. E., Life and Character of, 82; and Washington, a parallel, 88; Strategy of, 90; at Chambersburg, 119; at Gettysburg, 124; Surrender by. 177; peerless, 192; sublime in action, 191; did not offer his sword to Grant, 269, 309. Letcher, Governor, John, 364. Lewis, Dr Samuel E., 273. Lincoln, Assassination of, 46, 56; offered no terms, 177 call for troops in 1861, 253. Little General Henry, Burial of, 212. Lively. E. H., 177, 227. Lost Chapter, in C. S. History, The, 844. McCaleb, Hon. E. H., 3. McClellan, General G B., 102, 287. McDonald, Major E. H 163. McGuire, Dr Hunter, 99, 336. Magruder, General John B., 198. Manassas, Second Battle of, 305. Marietta, Ga., Burning of, 198. Marshall, Colonel, Ch