Browsing named entities in Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Letcher or search for Letcher in all documents.

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e and their possessions in a state of defense. Gen. Robert E. Lee having been appointed by Governor Letcher to command all Virginia forces until the State should be formally incorporated in the Confe service such volunteer companies as might offer themselves in compliance with the call of Governor Letcher, and to take command of them. His command was confined to the counties of Wetzel, Marshallton, about the same time, with two regiments of infantry. Thus it appears that so far as Governor Letcher and General Lee could act in defense of the exposed northwestern frontier of Virginia, allhich would inevitably lead to military despotism. During the session of this convention, Governor Letcher issued a proclamation June 14th, to the people of northwestern Virginia, pointing out that on of May 3d, Pierpont also was elected governor of Virginia, to fill the unexpired term of Governor Letcher, and he continued to administer the affairs of the Trans-Alleghany until the new State was
qual struggle. Colonel Heck, whose mission to Richmond has been mentioned, was on the way early in June with a battery of four pieces from Shenandoah county, Captain Moorman's cavalry company, and three companies of Virginia infantry, and Governor Letcher had called out the militia from the counties of Pendleton, Highland, Bath, Pocahontas, Randolph and Barbour. The response to this call seems to have been patriotic and abundant, but Colonel Heck decided to send the major part home to tend td pieces. On May 3d a commission as colonel was sent to C. Q. Tompkins, of Charleston, and he was directed to take command of the troops raised in the valley. The latter officer sent Colonel McCausland to Richmond, May 30th, to confer with Governor Letcher on the situation. It was difficult to procure reliable soldiers in large numbers, with perhaps the preponderance of sentiment favoring the Federal cause. By this time McCausland and Tompkins had gathered but 340 men at Kanawha Court House
t Pleasant, Mason county, where he received a preparatory education. He was graduated with first honors in the class of 1857 at the Virginia military institute, and subsequently acted as assistant professor in that institution until 1861. Upon the secession of Virginia he organized the famous Rockbridge artillery, of which he was elected commander; but leaving Dr. Pendleton in charge of that company, he made his headquarters at Charleston, in the Kanawha valley, under commission from Governor Letcher, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, for the organization of troops in the military department of Western Virginia. He gathered about 6,000 men for the commands of Generals Wise and Floyd, who subsequently operated in that region, and formed the Thirty-sixth regiment, Virginia infantry, of which he took command, with a commission as colonel. This regiment, made up of the best blood of the western Virginia counties, was distinguished under his leadership in the campaign of Floyd's bri