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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John Letcher or search for John Letcher in all documents.

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On Monday, May fifth, we left camp at Valley Mills, Augusta County, six miles north of Staunton, with five days rations, without tents and baggage, save blankets, under the command of Gen. Ed. Johnson, and the next day the advanceguard under Col. Letcher fell in with the outposts of the enemy--one cavalry company and a body of infantry, near the forks of the Jennings Gap and the Parkersburgh turnpike roads, twenty-one miles from Staunton. Letcher fired upon the enemy, killing three, wounding Letcher fired upon the enemy, killing three, wounding several, and taking one prisoner. About this time Old Stonewall passed up the road and had a consultation with Gen. Johnson. Soon after the consultation, Johnson's army pushed up the road in pursuit of the enemy toward Shenandoah Mountain, followed by Jackson's. When we arrived at the foot of the mountain, on the east side, we found that a regiment of Yankees had been camped there, but had left on hearing of our appearance, leaving behind all their tents, clothing, commissary stores and a n
gates. By John T. Cowan, Deputy. On the fifteenth Governor Letcher issued the following proclamation, declaring that the1862, and in the eighty-sixth year of the Commonwealth. John Letcher. The meeting thus called assembled at the City Hall, Capt. J. B. Danforth presiding, and Mayor Mayo and Governor Letcher made speeches. Mr. Joseph Mayo, the Mayor of the r the city, they must elect another in his place. Governor Letcher was then called on, and heartily approved the objectsng monument. --Richmond Dispatch. Proclamation of Governor Letcher. To afford every facility in the power of the rtion of each day to necessary drill and discipline, I, John Letcher, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, do hereby prresent, and be regularly drilled until sunset each day. John Letcher. The following advertisements appeared in the Richmlowing additional particulars, contained in a letter to Gov. Letcher from Col. Francis H. Smith: Winchester, September 16.
e of Delegates. By John T. Cowan, Deputy. On the fifteenth Governor Letcher issued the following proclamation, declaring that the capital of May, 1862, and in the eighty-sixth year of the Commonwealth. John Letcher. The meeting thus called assembled at the City Hall, Capt. J. B. Danforth presiding, and Mayor Mayo and Governor Letcher made speeches. Mr. Joseph Mayo, the Mayor of the city, stated that the City surrender the city, they must elect another in his place. Governor Letcher was then called on, and heartily approved the objects of the most lasting monument. --Richmond Dispatch. Proclamation of Governor Letcher. To afford every facility in the power of the Executivevote a portion of each day to necessary drill and discipline, I, John Letcher, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, do hereby proclaim thfficer present, and be regularly drilled until sunset each day. John Letcher. The following advertisements appeared in the Richmond pape
thousand, and the negroes from fifteen hundred to two thousand. Of our losses we are not apprised, but judge from reports that Gen. Jackson's column suffered pretty heavily. In Walker's division we had five killed, three of these by the accidental explosion of a shell. Among the killed in this division, we have heard the name of Lieut. Robertson, of French's battery. later.--Since the above was written we have received the following additional particulars, contained in a letter to Gov. Letcher from Col. Francis H. Smith: Winchester, September 16. After the advance of our army to Frederick, and the issuing of the admirable proclamation to the people of Maryland by Lee, a movement took place with our troops, seemingly in the direction of Pennsylvania, but really for an important movement into Virginia. After sending a portion of his troops to occupy and hold the Maryland Heights, Gen. Jackson was directed by Gen. Lee to recross the Potomac at Williamsport, take possession of