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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 95 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 49 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 44 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 38 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Letcher or search for John Letcher in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Shall Cromwell have a statue? (search)
hat time the record was unbroken. Beginning with South Carolina on December 20, State after State, meeting in convention, had with significant unanimity passed ordinances of secession. Each successive ordinance was felt to be equivalent to a renewed declaration of war. The outlook was dark indeed, and, amid the fast gathering gloom, all eyes, all thoughts, turned to Virginia. She represented the Border States; her action, it was felt, would largely influence, and might control theirs. John Letcher was then governor—a States Rights Democrat, of course; but a Union man. By him the legislature of the State was called together in special session, and that legislature, in January, passed what was known as a convention bill. Practically Virginia was to vote on the question at issue. Events moved rapidly. South Carolina had seceded on December 20; Mississippi on January 8; Florida on the 10th; Alabama on the 11th; Georgia followed on the 19th; Louisiana on the 26th, with Texas on Febru
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
the balmy July air and the luxuriant verdure of Hayfields, all combined to make the scene enchanting to soldiers who have been for months campaigning on the battle-scarred plains and valleys of Virginia. From there I moved across the Green Spring Valley, in Baltimore county, and passing near the country residence of the then governor of Maryland, Augustus W. Bradford, I detailed Lieutenant Blackstone, of the Maryland cavalry, to burn it, in retaliation for the burning of the home of Governor Letcher of Virginia, which had been destroyed by General Hunter, at Lexington. I bivouacked that night at The Caves, the place of John N. Carroll, Esq. About midnight I received a message by the two couriers left at Hayfields, from Colonel Clarke, whom I had sent into Baltimore. He informed me that all the available transportation of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad was concentrated at Locust Point; that the Nineteenth Corps of Grant's army, under General Emory, and part of the Sixth Corps w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The campaign and battle of Lynchburg. (search)
that he ordered the Virginia Military Institute, a college for the education of youth, to be burned, and that he also ordered the burning of the residence of Hon. John Letcher, formerly Governor of Virginia, alleging as his reason for this latter act of barbarity that the Governor had urged the people to rise in arms to repel the invasion. In burning both places he gave no time for anything to be saved. The family of Governor Letcher barely escaped with the clothes upon their persons, and the torch was applied to the Institute without the opportunity to save its library, its philosophical apparatus, its furniture or its archives. All alike were consumed lant when there was no enemy, and a coward when they were in sight. He burned the Military Institute, which was not even garrisoned by boys, and set fire to Governor Letcher's house, which only a woman protected. If the bravest are the tenderest, how true it is that the cowards are the cruelest. The renegade, David H. Strother
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index (search)
nston's Last Volley at Durham, N. C., 174. Keith, Judge, James, 144. Kemper, General J. L., sketch of, portrait of, 260. Kentucky Resolutions, 1798-9,9. LaBorde. History of S. C. College, 141. Lamar, C. A. C., 856; L. Q. C., 366. Lane, General J. H., 112. Lee, and Virginia, 15: Captain R. E., 217; General R. E., statue of 3, 123; cited, 21, 26; Confederate orders of, 81, 122; Wormsley's lines on, 101; tributes to, 121. 332. Leopard, The, and the Chesaneake, 25. Letcher, Gov., John, house of burned, 219, 297. Lewis, M. D., Samuel E., 226. Lincoln's emancipation proclamation, 85; tribute to, 121; did not advise payment for slaves, 124, 332. Ludlow, General W. H., 84. Lynchburg Campaign and Battle of 251, 279; rolls of companies from, Rifle Grays, Company A, 314; Rifles, Company E, 316; Home Guard Company G, 317; Jeff. Davis Rifles, Company H (all 11th Va.), 319; Wise Troop, Company B, 2nd Va. Cavalry, 320; Lee Battery, Company A, Braxton's Battalion Art