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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 15 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Lizzie Letcher or search for Lizzie Letcher in all documents.

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Fire, sword, and the halter. (search)
llowed to remove her mother's, her sister's, her own and her children's clothing. This request being refused, she left the house. In a very short time they poured camphene on the parlor floor and ignited it with a match. In the meantime Miss Lizzie Letcher was trying to remove some articles of clothing from the other end of the house, and Berry, finding these in her arms, set fire to them. The wardrobe and bureaus were then fired, and soon the house was enveloped in flames. Governor LetcheGovernor Letcher's mother, then seventy-eight years old, lived on the adjoining lot. They fired her stable, within forty feet of the dwelling, evidently to burn it, too; but, owing to the active exertions of Captain Towns, who made his men carry water, the house was saved. While Hunter was in Lexington, Captain Mathew X. White, residing near the town, was arrested,. taken about two miles, and, without trial, was shot, on the allegation that he was a bushwhacker. During the first year of the war he commanded
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The old Capitol prison. (search)
undred, I stood near the door as they marched out, and, with hardly one exception, they shook me by the hand, in saying their good-bye, and expressed their sense of the kind treatment they had received. Governor Vance, of North Corolina, Governor Letcher, of Virginia, and Governor Brown, of Georgia, were, for a few months, recipients of the hospitalities of the Old Capitol, and endured the tedium of prison life with the patient courage of true-hearted men. Before the breaking out of the war,ting lazily his eyes on Vance, he became suddenly galvanized with an unexpected recognition, to which he gave vent with a Hell's blazes, Zeb Vance, is that yeow? The Governor avers he did the rest of that journey as an inside passenger. Governor Letcher was a fine specimen of a Virginian, frank, dignified, courteous, and generous, firm and unchangeable in his deliberate and matured purpose, and of inflexible integrity and honor. General Edward Johnson occupied the same room with the abo
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
s in a condition that admitted of repair. A large proportion of the hands employed were sent, with the uninjured machinery, to an armory established in North Carolina. The Black Horse Cavalry, after remaining several days on picket duty at Harper's Ferry, was ordered on similar service, to Berlin bridge, which crosses the Potomac from the county of London. It was while the command were at Harper's Ferry that Major Thomas J. Jackson, of the Virginia Military Institute, was ordered, by Governor Letcher, to take command, and the high reputation which he had won in the Mexican war inspired the volunteers with cheerfulness and confidence. From Berlin bridge, the Black Horse was ordered back to Warrenton, where the vacant captaincy was filled by the election of William H. Payne, heretofore, as before stated, a private in the command. This gentleman was, at that time, a member of the Warrenton bar, and had been, along with Captain B. H. Shackleford, a Secession candidate for the Stat
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Stonewall Jackson's Valley campaign. (search)
r his self-reliance or diminish his clear-sightedness. The discontent among the troops left at Romney resulted, on the 31st of January, in an order from the Secretary of War, sent without consultation, to withdraw Loring from that place.--Jackson obeyed the order, and at --once resigned, on the ground that such interference, by the department at Richmond, with the details of military affairs in the field, could only lead to disaster. After explanations, and upon the urgent request of Governor Letcher and General J. E. Johnston, he withdrew the resignation. Subsequently there was no desire on anybody's part to interfere with him. For the next month Jackson remained quietly at Winchester. General Loring and all his troops that were not Virginians were ordered elsewhere, and in order to induce reenlistments, furloughs were freely granted. The Confederate force was in this way reduced to about four-thousand men, exclusive of militia. With the 1st of March opened the great campaig
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The burning of Chambersburg. (search)
er lived in the county of Jefferson, near Harper's Ferry, and was a relative of General Hunter; A. R. Boteler and E. J. Lee also lived in the same vicinity. No reasons that I have ever heard have been given for the burning of their houses. Governor Letcher's property was in Lexington, Virginia; the Military Institute was near Lexington, also. I do not think that any better reasons can be given for the destruction of these properties than could have been given if General Hunter had destroyed e Virginia. The proclamation also stated that this course.had been adopted in retaliation for the destruction of property in Virginia, by the orders of General Hunter, and specified that the houses of Andrew Hunter, A. R. Boteler, E. J. Lee, Governor Letcher, J. T. Anderson, the Virginia Military Institute, and others in Virginia, had been burned by the orders of General D. Hunter, a Federal commander, and that the money demanded from Chambersburg was to be paid to these parties as a compensatio