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James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 23: three months in Congress. (search)
throughout the hall, upon this allusion, as it manifestly referred to the two editors, the gentleman from Pennsylvania, Mr. Levin, and the gentleman from New York, Mr. Greeley.] But Mr. R. (continuing to speak) said he was opposed to all personalitinever indulged in any such thing himself, and he never would favor such indulgence on the part of other gentlemen. Mr. Levin. I want merely to say— Mr. Root. I am afraid— [The confusion of voices and merriment which followed, completely drowned the few words of pleasant explanation delivered here by Mr. Levin.] Mr. Greeley addressed the chair. The Chairman. The gentleman from New York will suspend his remarks till the Committee shall come to order. Order being rest Mr. Greeley said he did not pretend to know what the editor of the Philadelphia Sun, the gentleman from Pennsylvania [Mr. Levin], had done. But if any gentleman, anxious about the matter, would inquire at the railroad offices in Philadelphia and
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life, Levin Smith. (search)
Levin Smith. Levin was a slave in Maryland. He married a free woman and had several children. In 1802, his master sold him to a speculator, who was in the habget a profitable chance to sell him. His new master was a desperate fellow, and Levin was uneasy with the constant liability of being sold to the far South. He openall sloop to catch him and bring him back to Delaware. The plan was to seize Levin in his bed, hurry him on board the sloop, and start off immediately, before hising previous, and so forgotten to get some goods on board, as he had promised. Levin was seized and carried off; but the sloop was obliged to wait for the goods, anassing in; but he pushed him aside, and went up to the chamber, where he found Levin with his hands tied, and guarded by five or six men. What are you going to do we treated you so roughly, if they had known who you were. He was informed that Levin was a slave in Maryland, but had been living in Delaware with a man who bought
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
Nat., promoted to lieutenant; Hudgins B. F., dead; Hall, John, dead; Height, Wiley, killed at Haw's Shop, May 28, 1864; Jones, B. F., wounded at Trevillian, July 12, 1864; Laws, William, killed at Tood's Tavern, May 6, 1864; Marrow, D. G.; Mears, Levin, died in Richmond in 1863; Moreland, Alphonzo, dead; Murry, John, died in 1864; Phillips, C. Hopkins, dead; Peddicord, Alexander; Parramore, John, dead; Sewell, J. M., dead; Selden, Henry, killed in September, 1864; Sinclair, G. K.; Selden, R. C.kins, dead; Peddicord, Alexander; Parramore, John, dead; Sewell, J. M., dead; Selden, Henry, killed in September, 1864; Sinclair, G. K.; Selden, R. C.; Southall, Travis M.; Sheilds, W. P.; Tilford, J. C., dead; Vaughan, Alexander, captured at Front Royal, 1864, dead; Vaughan, Howard, dead; Winder, Levin G.; Worthington, James, dead; Walter, Isaac, dead; Wilson, Robert; Wainwright, J. C.; Wray, John, promoted lieutenant and captured at Brandy Station, October II, 1862; Wray, George; Young, W. L.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.44 (search)
nearly as can be reckoned, was in the year 1815. He did not go to Fayetteville, if at all, until 1825, and must have been fifteen years old that year, and must have lived in Charleston for at least ten years before he became Mr. Belden's classmate, unless it shall transpire that Mr. Belden really attended school with Judah at the old brick school-house in St. Michael's alley, Charleston. There is no doubt that Mr. Benjamin lived in Charleston, and went to school in this city. He told Mr. Levin that such was the case. Mr. B. C. Hard, of Williamston, S. C., who is still living, says that he was in Judah's class; that Judah was a very bright pupil, and quoted Shakespeare while playing marbles; that his teacher was Robert Southworth. Among his classmates, or school-fellows, were N. Russell Middleton, T. Leger Hutchinson, W. J. Hard, Mitchell King,——Wilson, B. C. Hard, Stephen Thomas and others—all for many years residents of this city. The Hebrew Orphan Society paid for his schoo<
Fifty Dollars reward. --Ranaway from my farm in Goochland county, two miles from too James River and Gani why Canal and forty-six miles from Richmond on the 25th of July, my boy Levin. Said boy is a very dark color, about 5 feet 3 or 4 inches high very stout and about 18 years old. The glands of his throat are swelled which gives him the appearances of having a very think neck. He had on when he left a black velvet cap and dark worsted think. I purchased him of Capt. Jas N. Spence who brought him from the Eastern shots of Maryland and he is doubtless trying to make his way back there. The above reward will be paid for his safe delivery to me at Boyle & Hamble's in this city, or at my farm in Goochland or in any jail in the State so that I get him. E. Soyon [jy 30--1w*]
Fifty dollars reward. --Ran away from my farm, in Goochland county, two miles from the James River and Kent who Canal and forty six miles from Richmond on the 25th of July, my her Levin. Said boy is a very dark color, about 5 forth 3 or 4 inches high very stout and about 16 years old. The glands of his threat are swelled, which gives him the appearance of having a very thick neck. He had on when he left a black velvet cap and dark worked skirt. I purchased him of Capt Jos N Spence, who brought him from the Eastern shore of Maryland, and he is doubtless trying to make his way back there. The above reward will be paid for his safe delivery to me at Boyle & Gamble's in this city, or as my farm, in Goochland or in any jail in the State so that I get him. N Boyle [jy 30--1w*]
Fifty dollars reward. --Ran away from my farm, in Goochland county, two miles from the James River and Kens who Canal, and forty-six miles from Richmond on the 25th of July, my boy Levin. Said boy is a very dark color, about 5 feet 3 or 4 inches high very stout and about 18 years old. The glands of his throat are swelled which gives him the appearance of having a very thick neck. He had on when he left a black velvet cap and dark worsted shirt. I purchased him of Capt Spence, who brought him from the Eastern shore of Maryland, and he is doubtless trying to make his way back there. The above reward will be paid for his safe delivery to me, at Boyle & Gamble's, in this city, or at my farm, in Goochland or in any jail in the State, so that I get him. E Boyle [jy 30--1w*]