Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Lewis or search for Lewis in all documents.

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. Preston's youngest sister had married Governor William Clark, of Missouri, and her husband's niece was the wife of Thomas H. Benton. Governor William Clark was one of the foremost men of the West; a younger brother of the great George Rogers Clark, he shared his boldness and sagacity without his infirmities, and reaped the legitimate rewards of energy and intellect from which unthrift debarred the hero. He had early in life obtained great celebrity by his explorations, in conjunction with Lewis, of the sources of the Columbia River and in the Far West. He was Governor of Missouri for many years, and, as Indian agent, enjoyed justly the confidence of his Government and of the Indian tribes. With wealth, intelligence, virtue, and popular manners, he was well fitted for his place as a leader in a young republic. His first wife, Miss Julia Hancock, was a woman of eminent graces and singular beauty: after her death he married her cousin, Mrs. Radford. His descendants and collaterals
by George Rogers Clark with an American force. After this, the Sacs and Foxes were engaged in wars with the Osages and other tribes, but especially with the Sioux, against whom they waged a deadly feud. Nevertheless they were prosperous, and a leading tribe in numbers; while in warlike spirit, sagacity, polity, and general intelligence, they were excelled by none of the tribes of the Northwest. In 1805 Lieutenant Pike represented their numbers at 4,600, of whom 1,100 were warriors; but Lewis and Clark compute that they were 3,200 strong, of whom 800 were warriors, which was probably nearer the truth. In 1825, the Secretary of War, adopting the estimate of Governor William Clark, reckoned their entire strength at 6,600, with a force of 1,200 or 1,400 warriors; thus showing a rapid gain in strength in twenty years. General St. Clair, Governor of the Northwest Territory, made the first treaty with the Sacs and Foxes in 1789. General William Henry Harrison concluded another tr
. G. Shaver, commanding. Seventh Arkansas Regiment, Colonel Shaver. Eighth Arkansas Regiment, Colonel W. R. Patterson. Twenty-fourth Tennessee Regiment, Colonel R. D. Allison. Ninth Arkansas Regiment, Colonel J. J. Mason. Second division. Brigadier-General Buckner, commanding. Cavalry. Kentucky Regiment, Colonel B. H. Helm. Tennessee Regiment, Major Cox. Artillery. Lyon's and Porters batteries. Infantry. First Brigade.-Colonel Hanson, commanding. Hanson's, Thompson's, Trabue's, Hunt's, and Lewis's Kentucky Regiments. Second Brigade.-Colonel Baldwin, commanding. Fourteenth Mississippi Regiment, Colonel Baldwin. Twenty-sixth Tennessee Regiment, Colonel Lillard. Third Brigade.-Colonel J. C. Brown, commanding. Third Tennessee Regiment, Colonel Brown. Twenty-third Tennessee Regiment, Colonel Martin. Eighteenth Tennessee Regiment, Colonel Palmer. reserve. Texas Regiment of Cavalry, Colonel B. F. Terry. Artillery-Harper's and Spencer's batteries. Infantry-Tennessee Regiment, Colonel S