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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry.—1764-1805. (search)
isible, from Nova Scotia to Newburyport, in the spring-time of 1805; whose arrival was the unsuspected event of the year in the third city of Massachusetts The seal of the province of New Brunswick is a ship nearing port under full sail, with the legend. Spem redurit.—for the six or seven thousand inhabitants were celebrating rather the building of the new Court House on the Mall, the founding of the Social Library, and the opening of Plum Island turnpike and bridge, or making careful note of the thirty days drought in July and August. On the 10th of December, The town records say the 12th. in a little frame house, still standing on School Street, between the First Presbyterian Church, in which Whitefield's remains are interred, and the house in which the great preacher died,—and so in the very bosom of orthodoxy,—a man-child was born to Abijah and Fanny Lib. 4.15. Garrison, and called, after an uncle who subsequently lost his life in Boston harbor, William Lloyd Garr
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 2: Boyhood.—1805-1818. (search)
rket Street and had a modest workshop in the yard adjoining his house. There the little boy, who was only nine years old, and so small that his fellow-workmen called him not much bigger than a last, toiled for several months until he could make a tolerable shoe, to his great pride and delight. He was much too young and small for his task, however, and it soon became evident that he lacked the strength to pursue the work. He always retained a vivid recollection of the heavy lapstone, on Lib. 19.19. which he pounded many a sole until his body ached and his knees were sore and tremulous; of the threads he waxed, and the sore fingers he experienced from sewing shoes; and not less vividly, but much more gratefully, did he remember the kindness shown him by his worthy master and wife, in whose family he lived during his brief apprenticeship. From their house he witnessed the great gale of September, 1815, which made as strong an impression on his memory as the great Newburyport fire
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 3: Apprenticeship.—1818-1825. (search)
, and signed G., on page 160 of the fifth volume of the Liberator (1835), gives evidence of their continued friendship, however. but that with Knapp, as will abundantly appear, was more enduring and of the highest importance. Though Lloyd was not, like Crocker, a communicant in the church, he was a constant attendant at its meetings, and had become, as his mother had fondly anticipated, a complete Baptist as to the tenets. He had never been baptized, himself, but he was yet zealous for Lib. 19.178. immersion as the only acceptable baptism; he believed in the clerical order and the organized church as divinely instituted, and was a strict Sabbatarian. He early became familiar with the Bible, and could repeat scores of verses by heart, but he did not realize their full meaning and power until his consecration to the cause of the slave led him to study the book anew. It was during the year 1824 that he first discovered his near-sightedness, and when he one day chanced to try t
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 4: editorial Experiments.—1826-1828. (search)
elf is betrayed in the last of the three verses quoted below: I always like a Boston carnival— Lib. 1.92. And nothing better than election week ; It comes to all a happy annual— ('Tis not too latied, with kindling eye, Yes, but think of the magnitude of his theme! the majesty of his cause! (Lib., 10.193.) Instead of being able to withstand the tide of public Journal of the Times, Dec But it shows, in bold relief, what the spirit of philanthropy can dare and conquer (W. L. G. in Lib., Sept. 20, 1839). Rivers and mountains vanish in his path; midnight finds him wending his solita and appeals to move his hearers: He might as well have urged the stones in the streets to Lib. 9.151. cry out in behalf of the perishing captives. O the moral cowardice, the chilling apathyev. Howard Malcolm), who arose at the conclusion of A. O. B. in Boston Courier, Aug. 12, 1828; Lib. 4.43. Lundy's remarks and passionately denounced the agitation of the question of slavery in New
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 5: Bennington and the Journal of the Times1828-29. (search)
of William Ladd William Ladd, a native of Exeter, N. H. (1778), graduate of Harvard College (1797), and for a number of years a sea-captain, devoted himself during the last eighteen years of his life (1823-1841) to the advocacy of the Peace cause, and was largely instrumental in establishing the American Peace Society in 1828. See his Memoir by John Hemmenway, Boston, 1872, and Mrs. Child's Letters from New York, 1st series, p. 212. Mr. Garrison addressed a sonnet to this great advocate (Lib. 1.39), but more intimate acquaintance led to the judgment, He is a good-natured man, but somewhat superficial (Ms., spring of 1833, to Henry E. Benson). in behalf of peace were frequently alluded to in the Journal, as they had been in the Philanthropist and Free Press; Mr. Ladd having visited and spoken in Newburyport while Mr. Garrison was editing the latter paper, and found in him a ready listener. Much space was devoted also to the movement with which, as has been already stated, he hea
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 6: the genius of Universal emancipation.1829-30. (search)
ison's tribute to her memory, after visiting her grave in 1853, will be found in Lib. 23.190. He declared her worthy to be associated with Elizabeth Heyrick of Englsystem, was proposed privately, though no reference to it appears in the Genius (Lib. 1.111). and Mr. Garrison wrote thus in their vindication: There is a prevalve not been commemorated as they deserve. (See May's Recollections, p. 133, and Lib., 1.17.) He is a unique figure in the anti-slavery movement. The late Rev. Henr happened to one such, the Enterprise, driven into Bermuda by stress of weather (Lib. 5.47, 51, 85). and in many respects the former equalled and even exceeded the ler, Nov. 26, 1831). Fully fifty thousand slaves a year, it was estimated, Lib. 4.91. were sold and transported from one State to another, in this infernal tra was a native of Connecticut, and a son of Judge Stephen Mitchell of that State (Lib. 1.111). The counsel for the prosecution, finding that the extracts from the
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 7: Baltimore jail, and After.—1830. (search)
ated by him: During my late incarceration in Baltimore prison, four men Lib. 1.21. came to obtain a runaway slave. He was brought out of his cell to confromagnify thy name. He furthermore wrote a series of twenty stanzas in fair Lib. 1.92. Byronic metre, chiefly addressed to a young lady whom he had met but oncehan to write to Henry Clay, asking him to use his influence with his personal Lib. 34.49. and political friends in Baltimore to that end, and he took pains to remreated on the voyage, and claiming credit for having actually relieved their Lib. 1.2. condition in some degree, since he had carried them to a climate much morecal motives: 1. A sense of duty, as an advocate of freedom, and a hater Lib. 1.9. of tyranny and of all its abettors. 2. A desire to evince to the Southernepudiate as absurd and pernicious,—I am largely indebted to them for the change (Lib. 19.178; Life of James and Lucretia Mott, pp. 296, 297). In New York he repe
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 8: the Liberator1831. (search)
iderations of expediency. We are out of the Lib. 1.35. arena of politics, and we mean to keep oial to me what party or sect I am invited to Lib. 1.39. address on this subject. Universal emanear the editor recalled the second stanza as Lib. :143. prophecy, it seemed rather to the panic-my right hand and on my left. The tongue of Lib. 1.139. detraction is busy against me. I have n (Lundy, Genius, October, 1831). You have (I Lib. 1.165. hope unintentionally) calumniated my cupon the head of a citizen of Massachusetts— Lib. 1.207. for what? For daring to give his opinioring a scheme of gradual emancipation with Lib. 2.7. compensation—which Mr. Garrison ironicallse the speech, and the Whig ask: What is the Lib. 2.18. question of who shall be President—of Baion Society, but he was denied permission to Lib. 1.27. speak; nor did he meet with much success hopes it will be the last, and calls it an Lib. 1.47. outrage . . . upon the moral sense of th[146 more...
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 9: organization: New-England Anti-slavery Society.—Thoughts on colonization.—1832. (search)
the movement, and, in the Liberator of the Lib. 1.201. following day, called for the names of Of these only three were natives of Boston (Lib. 7.53). Five at least were still living in 1874Secretary of the American Anti-Slavery Society (Lib. 3.1). The extract is taken from remarks made aleague of President Storrs and Professor Green (Lib. 3.2). It should be mentioned here that it was denounced it as the first foreign effort to Lib. 2.61. intermeddle with the subject of slavery s zeal and courage from Garrison and Lundy, see Lib. 2.35, 43, 133; 3.182. Perhaps no sight was monce—I tell you fearlessly and truly that you Lib. 2.83. ought rather to rejoice than despond. Ythe Grand Jury that it is an offence against Lib. 2.55. the peace of the Commonwealth, and that considered articles, which were successively Lib. 2.118, 122, 125, 130, 149. reproduced in the Laces calculated and tending [Judge Thacher's Lib. 2.199. word] to inflame the slave population o[52 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 10: Prudence Crandall.—1833. (search)
Liberator of March 2, 1833, when the editor Lib. 3.35. announced, with a rush of pleasurable emsult of the meeting was reported to the Lib- Lib. 3.42. erator of March 16, by Henry E. Benson, ddressed to her who is the ornament of her sex (Lib. 4.47). Miss Crandall was his senior by two yea bells); This act was repealed in May, 1838 (Lib. 8.91). that, under this act, Miss Crandall wascountenance and even the physical support of Lib. 3.99, 107, 114, 130, 151, 175. the townspeople Be it so, said Squire Judson, in an address Lib. 3.107, 43, 54. to the Colonization Society siguth as the best means of advancing the Society (Lib. 3.54). that $10,000 reward have been offered mental avowal in the Liberator of March 16—We Lib. 3.43. declare that our heart is neither affectxtracts from his private correspondence, as the Lib- erator contained but few particulars. It was 0th anniversary of the Boston Mob, p. 11; also, Lib. 25.173). Before the winds themselves abandoned[24 more...]
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