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William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 1,765 1 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 1,301 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 947 3 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 914 0 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 776 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 495 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 485 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 456 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 410 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 405 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 14, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Abraham Lincoln or search for Abraham Lincoln in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 6 document sections:

st be done, or disunion is inevitable. The North has as much interest in the South, in the welfare and prosperity of the South, as our Southern brethren. The Constitution demands that fugitive slaves be returned.--Common honesty requires that they should have full and equal rights in all the Territories. The future condition of the Territories. so far as the extension of slavery is concerned, will be ultimately determined, natural laws, climate, soil, productions, &c. The election of Mr. Lincoln has caused the South to believe there is no longer any safety for them or their property in the Union nor the slaveholding States. There can only be permanent peace between the sections when the free States are ready to stop the discussion of the abstract question of morals connected with this subject, and look upon it only as a political question. What is most needed is the restoration of kindly feeling. Then we may hope an honest and faithful discharge of all the constitutional oblig
hers equally with our own, we had been engaged in the work of developing our own industry. Yet we have been for five and twenty years the objects of Northern malignity and outrage, until at last our wrongs have culminated in the election of Abraham Lincoln to the Presidency. Without giving a catalogue of our wrongs, he said, it was time to examine well and inquire whether there is not in that grandest work of man — the Constitution — some imperfections which may be remedied. We must inquire frican had suck to poverty or to insanity. Is not the hand of God in this! And yet they come and say to you, you must liberate these people or you must be damned. The "irrepressible conflict" doctrine was next considered. The election of Lincoln was upon the avowed declaration that slavery is a sin and that the curse of God is upon it, and how they flaunt their banners in our faces with this principle inscribed thereon. It was an easy thing to surrender property and position, but for a
Secession meeting at Waverly, Mo. Waverly, Mo., Jan. 11. --An ultra secession meeting was held here last night, and passed a resolution strongly denouncing the St. Louis Democrat and forbidding its circulation. Lincoln was burned in effigy, amid the firing of cannon, display of torchlights, etc.
ng items: Lieut. Talbot, with the dispatches from Major Anderson to the Government, arrived in Washington yesterday afternoon, and repaired immediately to the Adjutant General's Office, and with the Adjutant General went to see the President, and had an interview. Lieut T. is stopping at the residence of his mother, near S., Aloysius' Church. We have entirely reliable information that Robert E. Scott, of Virginia, does not entertain the least idea of going into the Cabinet of Mr. Lincoln, unless the existing national troubles be previously settled upon a basis satisfactory to the conservative portion of the people of the South. At a private dinner party yesterday, high words passed between Senator Toombs and Lieutenant General Scott. According to relations of the affair in Congressional circles, the conversation turned on the sending of troops to Charleston, when Mr. Toombs expressed the hope that the people there would sink the Star of the West. Gen. Scott, with mu
ressed the opinion to our Washington correspondent that every energy of the people and the leading men should now be devoted to averting civil war, and believes the best way to do this is to make the opposing forces as nearly equal as possible. Lincoln is inclined to peace, but cannot abandon the "no extension of slavery" platform of his party. "I have yet to learn," said Lincoln, "that it is the part of wisdom for a man to have his friends and go over to his enemies," We of the South, we hoporrespondent that every energy of the people and the leading men should now be devoted to averting civil war, and believes the best way to do this is to make the opposing forces as nearly equal as possible. Lincoln is inclined to peace, but cannot abandon the "no extension of slavery" platform of his party. "I have yet to learn," said Lincoln, "that it is the part of wisdom for a man to have his friends and go over to his enemies," We of the South, we hope, have yet to learn the same thing.
to averting civil war, and believes the best way to do this is to make the opposing forces as nearly equal as possible. Lincoln is inclined to peace, but cannot abandon the "no extension of slavery" platform of his party. "I have yet to learn," said Lincoln, "that it is the part of wisdom for a man to leave his friends and go over to his enemies." If we manage to keep out of war until Lincoln comes in. Gen. Green thinks the future peace of the country will depend greatly on Lincoln's Cabinet es." If we manage to keep out of war until Lincoln comes in. Gen. Green thinks the future peace of the country will depend greatly on Lincoln's Cabinet — in which, as at present constituted, according to the papers, he has little confidence. Zed. es." If we manage to keep out of war until Lincoln comes in. Gen. Green thinks the future peace of the country will depend greatly on Lincoln's Cabinet — in which, as at present constituted, according to the papers, he has little confidence. Ze