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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Abraham Lincoln or search for Abraham Lincoln in all documents.

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Doc. 119.-President Lincoln's letter to the citizens of Manchester, England. see Doc. 96, page 344 ante. Manchester, February 10, 1863. The following letter and inclosure were received yesterday by the Mayor of Manchester, Abel Heywood, Esq.: Legation of the United States, London, February 9, 1863. sir: I have the honor to transmit to you, by the hands of Mr. Moran, the Assistant Secretary of this Legation, a letter of the President of the United States, addressed to you stained by your great nation; and, on the other hand, I have no hesitation in assuring you that they will excite admiration, esteem, and the most reciprocal feelings of friendship among the American people. I hail this interchange of sentiment, therefore, as an augury that, whatever else may happen, whatever misfortune may befall your country or my own, the peace and friendship which now exist between the two nations will be, as it shall be my desire to make them, perpetual. Abraham Lincoln.
ault on the works. During the progress of the fight a ten-inch mortar-shell, loaded with sand, fell on the deck of the Passaic. It struck on the weakest of the deck, and, further than a disfiguration of the armor, did no damage to the vessel. This was a test that the monitors had not before undergone, and it will be a matter of congratulation to know that they are invulnerable to even mortar projectiles. Wednesday, March 4.--This is the second anniversary of the inauguration of President Lincoln, and the war still progresses. God grant that its next anniversary may find peace and happiness prevailing throughout the land. The morning has again opened bright and beautiful — a cloudless sky and a warm sun shining down on this scene of human antagonism. At the time I write, the monitor fleet are moving forward in momentary anticipation of a renewal of the conflict. The incessant mortar-firing during the night it was thought had prevented the repair of the damage done yesterd
Doc. 133.-President Lincoln's proclamation by the President of the United States. A proclamation respecting soldiers absent without leave. Executive mansion, March 10, 1863. In pursuance of the twenty-sixth section of the act of Congress, entitled an act for enrolling and calling out the National forces, and for other purposes, approved on the third of March in the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, I, Abraham Lincoln, President and Commander-in-Chief of the army and navy of the United States, do hereby order and command that all soldiers enlisted or drafted into the service of the United States, now absent from their regiments wibellion. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand. Done at the city of Washington, this tenth day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-seventh. By the President, Abraham Lincoln. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War.
their ordinary secular pursuits, and to unite, at their several places of public worship and their respective homes, in keeping the day holy to the Lord, and devoted to the humble discharge of the religious duties proper to that solemn occasion. All this being done, in sincerity and truth, let us then rest humbly in the hope, authorized by the Divine teaching, that the united cry of the nation will be heard on high, and answered with blessings, no less than the pardon of our national sins, and restoration of our now divided and suffering country to its former happy condition of unity and peace. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the United States to be fixed. [L. S.] Done at the city of Washington on this thirtieth day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the independence of the United States the eighty-seventh. By the President: Abraham Lincoln. William H. Seward, Secretary of State.
Doc. 155.-internal and Coastwise intercourse. President Lincoln's proclamation: by the President of the United States of America. A proclamation. whereas, in pursuance of the act of Congress, approved July thirteenth, 1861, I did, by proclation, dated August sixteenth, 1861, declare that the inhabitants of the Statehirteenth, 1861, and the proper regulation of the commercial intercourse authorized by said act with the loyal citizens of said States ; Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, do hereby revoke the said exceptions, and declare that the inhabitants of the States of Georgia, South-Carolina, North-Carolitness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the city of Washington, this thirty-first day of March, A. D. 1863, and of the independence of the United States of America the eighty-seventh. By the President, Abraham Lincoln. William H. Seward, Secretary of State.
t, in utter disregard of the Federal Constitution, making him virtually a despot. So far from this exciting a spirit of resistance, as many have vainly expected, from every portion of the North there comes nothing now but the note of preparation for the vigorous prosecution of the unholy war. The most sanguine must have abandoned all hopes of peace from foreign intervention or negotiations; from exhaustion of the enemy's men and means, or from such resistance on the part of his subjects to Lincoln's tyrannical rule. With his control of the purse and power of draft there will be no lack of men for his armies. It does not become us then, to shut our eyes to the fact that there cannot be any reasonable hope of peace, with his consent, during his term of office. It only remains for the people of this Confederacy, through themselves and their constituents, State and confederate authorities, to make adequate preparation to repel successfully the vandal attack. In their hands are thei
ave declared, on oath, his intention to become a citizen of the United States under the laws thereof, and who shall be found within the United States at any time during the continuance of the present insurrection and rebellion, at or after the expiration of the sixty-five days from the date of this proclamation, nor shall any such plea of alienage be allowed in favor of any such person who has so as aforesaid declared his intention to become a citizen of the United States, and shall have exercised at any time the right of suffrage or any other political franchise within the United States, under the laws thereof, or under the laws of any of the several States. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my seal and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the city of Washington, this eighth day of May, in the year of our Lord 1863, and of the independence of the United States the eighty-seventh. Abraham Lincoln. By the President, Wm. H. Seward, Secretary of State.
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