hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 8 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 22 results in 5 document sections:

Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: Bryant and the minor poets (search)
s that details the look, habits, and habitat of single objects: The yellow Violet (with an intrusive moral-but his morals are, contrary to traditional opinion, seldom intrusive, being part of the imaginative and emotional texture), and Robert of Lincoln (which is besides most fetching in its playfulness and Bryant's one success in dramatic portrayal). He was a good observer; he would never have placed, like Coleridge, a star within the nether tip of the crescent moon. There is an allied group n all is said, it is the whole man that is ours and that should be ours. He is the Citizen of our tradition; not to us today so much for his hand in the founding of two political parties, nor for his counsels by personal letter and speech that Lincoln, the Statesman of our tradition, heard with such grave respect, nor for his civic activities in art, charity, and reform; but for that Mosaic massive head, those deep, peering, brooding eyes, those white shaggy brows, and the great beard over th
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: fiction I — Brown, Cooper. (search)
Lafayette in 1824; in the same year Columbia College gave him the honorary degree of Master of Arts. He planned a series of Legends of the thirteen Republics, aimed to celebrate each of the original states, which he gave up after the first, Lionel Lincoln (1825), for all his careful research failed to please as his earlier novels had done. During the next two years Cooper reached probably the highest point of his career in The last of the Mohicans (February, 1826) and The prairie (May, 1827).ose dealing with storms, are tremendous. The ocean here plays as great a part as Cooper had lately assigned to the prairie. One voices the calm of nature, one its tumult; both tend to the discipline of man. In 1829 he fared better than with Lionel Lincoln in another historical tale of New England, The Wept of wish-ton-wish, an episode of King Philip's War. It is a powerful novel, irregular and ungenial, not only because the Puritans represented were themselves unlovely, but because Cooper had
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
28 Life in the New world, 212 Life of Columbus (see Columbus), 258 Life of Mahomet, 257 Life of Washington, 252, 253, 258-259 Lifetime, a, 261 n. 271 Lincoln, 278 Linn, Elizabeth, 292 Linn, John Blair, 165, 177 Linnaeus, 186, 195 Linwoods, the, 310 Lionel Lincoln, 297, 300 Lists of New England MagazinesLionel Lincoln, 297, 300 Lists of New England Magazines, 120 n. Literary history of the American Revolution, 135 n. Literary magazine, the, 292 Literary world, the, 239 Little Beach Bird, the, 278 Littlepage manuscripts, 304-305 Little people of the snow, 273, 281 Lives (Plutarch), 93 Lives of distinguished American naval officers, 302 Livingston, Brockholst, 246rica, 182 Ritter, Karl, 187 River, the, 271 Rivington, James, 182 Roach, Miss, Chevillette, 317 Rob of the bowl, 311 Robbins, Abigail, 192 Robert of Lincoln, 272 Robertson, William, 29, 91, 97 Robespierre, 91 Robin, Abb6, 212 Robinson, J., 227 Robinson Crusoe, 284, 302 Rogers, Major, Robert, 217 Rogers,
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters, Chapter 5: the Knickerbocker group (search)
ift succession, The pioneers, the first Leather- Stocking tale in order of composition, and The Pilot, to show that Scott's Pirate was written by a landsman! Lionel Lincoln and The last of the Mohicans followed. The next seven years were spent in Europe, mainly in France, where The Prairie and The red Rover were written. Coopers leading his company of volunteers into the Black Hawk War. The two men were destined to meet again in 1860, when Bryant presided at that Cooper Union address of Lincoln's which revealed to New York and to the country that the former captain of volunteers was now a king of men. Lincoln was embarrassed on that occasion, it is saidLincoln was embarrassed on that occasion, it is said, by Bryant's fastidious, dignified presence. Not so Nathaniel Hawthorne, who had seen the poet in Rome, two years before. There was a weary look in his face, wrote Hawthorne, as if he were tired of seeing things and doing things. He uttered neither passion nor poetry, but excellent good sense, and accurate information, on what
Leaves of Grass, Whitman 197, 200, 202-203 Letters, Motley 181 Letters from an American farmer, Crevecoeur, 60, 68 Liberator, the, 137, 217, 218 Library of American biography, 176 Life on the Mississippi, Clemens 237 Ligeia, Poe 193 Lincoln, Abraham, recognizes uncertainty in the nation, 2; would have approved Winthrop, 29; address at Cooper Union (1860), 104-105; quoted, 155; as a writer of liberty, 208; character and writings, 226-233; typically American, 265 Lionel Lincoln, Cooper 98 Literati, Pope 107 Little women, Alcott 140 London, Jack, 243-44 London in 1724, 54-56 Longfellow, H. W., in 1826, 89; attitude toward Transcendentalism, 143; life and writings, 152-57; died (1882), 255; disparagement of, 267 Longstreet, A. B., 245 Louisiana Purchase, 88 Lowell, J. R., in 1826, 90; attitude toward Transcendentalism, 143; life and writings, 168-74; died (1891), 255; typically American, 265 Luck of Roaring camp, the, Harte 241 Lyceum