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Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Xv. (search)
Xv. Wednesday night, February 10th, was an exciting one at the White House, the stables belonging to the mansion being burned to the ground. The loss most severely felt was of the two ponies, one of which had belonged to Willie Lincoln, the President's second son, who died in 1862, and the other to Tad, the youngest, and pet of his father, who in his infancy nicknamed him Tadpole subsequently abbreviated to Taddie, and then) Tad. His real name is Thomas, named for the father of Mr. LincolMr. Lincoln. Upon Tad's learning of the loss, he threw himself at full length upon the floor, and could not be comforted. The only allusion I ever heard the President make to Willie was on this occasion, in connection with the loss of his pony. John Hay, the assistant private secretary, told me that he was rarely known to speak of his lost son. The morning following the fire, Robert Lincoln came into his father's office, and said he had a point of law which he wished to submit. It appeared that o
and Stanton President's War order no. I Lincoln's questions to McClellan news from the West death of Willie Lincoln the Harper's Ferry Fiasco President's War order no. 3 the news from We have seen how the express orders of President Lincoln in the early days of January, 1862, stirnt his objections to the President's plan. Mr. Lincoln, thereupon, to bring the discussion to a prat was needed to subdue the rebellion. But Mr. Lincoln also saw the fearful responsibility he woulaneously, a heavy domestic sorrow fell upon Mr. Lincoln in the serious illness of his son Willie, a's father-in-law and chief of staff, came in, Lincoln's criticism of the affair was in sharper langw York Tribune, giving more details. President Lincoln was the coolest man in the whole gatheril; and when the general complained of this, Mr. Lincoln wrote him on April 9: After you left not by much severer punishment. But while Mr. Lincoln was shocked by McClellan's disrespect, he w
Chapter 22. Jackson's valley campaign Lincoln's visit to Scott Pope assigned to command arrison's Landing Seward sent to New York Lincoln's letter to Seward Lincoln's letter to McClLincoln's letter to McClellan-.Lincoln's visit to McClellan Halleck made General-in chief Halleck's visit to Mc C-the Maryland campaign battle of Antietam Lincoln visits Antietam Lincoln's letter to Mc CDowell, Shields, and Fremont, ordered by President Lincoln, not been thwarted by the mistake and de receipt of this alarming piece of news, President Lincoln instantly took additional measures of sat in serious peril. Meanwhile, under President Lincoln's order of June 26, General Pope had lefry, and greatly outraged the feelings of President Lincoln. But even under such irritation the Pree cabinet, the paper was never presented to Mr. Lincoln. The signers may have adopted the feeling at that on October 6, the second day after Mr. Lincoln's return to Washington, the following teleg[5 more...]
Chapter 23. Cameron's report Lincoln's letter to Bancroft annual message on slavery the Delaware sposed of in future as Congress might deem best. Mr. Lincoln saw clearly enough what a serious political role igency which the conflict still had in store. Mr. Lincoln had indeed already maturely considered and in hislled it, and the project withered in the bud. Mr. Lincoln did not stop at the failure of his Delaware experthe slow course of ocean mails, greatly surprised Mr. Lincoln, and his first comment upon it was positive and eyou have neglected it. This proclamation of President Lincoln's naturally created considerable and very dive forever. Even while the delegations listened, Mr. Lincoln could see that events had not yet ripened their mall then, thenceforward, and forever be free. Mr. Lincoln had given a confidential intimation of this step ase then, upon the greatest disasters of the war. Mr. Lincoln's recital continues: The wisdom of the vie
of the President for his action on slavery Lincoln's letters to Louisiana friends Greeley's open letter Mr. Lincoln's reply Chicago Clergymen urge emancipation Lincoln's answer- Lincoln Lincoln issues preliminary proclamation President Proposes constitutional amendment cabinet Considers fabinet discusses admission of West Virginia Lincoln signs Edict of freedom- Lincoln's letter to Lincoln's letter to Hodges The secrets of the government were so well kept that no hint whatever came to the public nces and sentiments. The open letter which Mr. Lincoln wrote in reply is remarkable not alone for Lincoln. It can hardly be doubted that President Lincoln, when he wrote this letter, intended tha 1862, after some playful preliminary talk, Mr. Lincoln said to his cabinet: gentlemen: I happlaud, and God must forever bless. But Mr. Lincoln was not encouraged by any response to this first consideration of the subject in July. Mr. Lincoln had then already seriously considered it, b[3 more...]
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
ry government in Europe. Those who sneered at it as a pompous brutum fulmen, forgot that slavery never was restored, where it had, by supreme authority, once been proclaimed abolished. Liberty takes no such steps backward. Slavery had been abolished by proclamation in San Domingo; it was the attempt to reinstate it, that whelmed that island in blood. Anywhere else, it would have the same effect. Lord Russell ridiculed it because it was levelled only at Slavery over territory beyond Mr. Lincoln's control, while all the States and Districts held by Federal armies were exempt. This would be a very flimsy objection, if it were true; but it was not. His Lordship forgot that the Proclamation was purely a war measure. Humane and sublime as the results were to be, it was not done as an act of humanity. Its sole immediate object was—like that of any other war measure—to weaken the enemies of the country, and strengthen its friends. In this light the measure was adopted for, and inte
ry government in Europe. Those who sneered at it as a pompous brutum fulmen, forgot that slavery never was restored, where it had, by supreme authority, once been proclaimed abolished. Liberty takes no such steps backward. Slavery had been abolished by proclamation in San Domingo; it was the attempt to reinstate it, that whelmed that island in blood. Anywhere else, it would have the same effect. Lord Russell ridiculed it because it was levelled only at Slavery over territory beyond Mr. Lincoln's control, while all the States and Districts held by Federal armies were exempt. This would be a very flimsy objection, if it were true; but it was not. His Lordship forgot that the Proclamation was purely a war measure. Humane and sublime as the results were to be, it was not done as an act of humanity. Its sole immediate object was—like that of any other war measure—to weaken the enemies of the country, and strengthen its friends. In this light the measure was adopted for, and inte
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Ninth: Emancipation of the African race. (search)
roclamation of Emancipation I addressed the following Letter of Counsel to colored men, which met the warm approval of Mr. Lincoln and Senator Sumner. It may not be wholly inappropriate now. Kind words to Africano-Americans. Washington, Jan. 1se the Union; and when we found that slavery would destroy the republic unless slavery should be wiped out itself, then Mr. Lincoln declared freedom to all the slaves of all the enemies of the Union. Now it has come to this, that this great war iseasure which made Slavery forever impossible in the Republic of the United States. Xv. Those who knew and loved Mr. Lincoln as many of us did, were more disposed to sympathize with him in the deep sadness which weighed down his spirit, than ts from our first hundred years, page 596, may illustrate the subject: The Dark in the White House.—Feb. 22, 1862.—Willie Lincoln is dead! Everybody in Washington knew Willie; and everybody was sad. Sad,—for it seemed hard for the lovely boy to b<
e to record the fact that this Bureau was, what Mr. Sumner had first declared it to be, the Bridge to Freedom. After the Proclamation of Emancipation I addressed the following Letter of Counsel to colored men, which met the warm approval of Mr. Lincoln and Senator Sumner. It may not be wholly inappropriate now. Kind words to Africano-Americans. Washington, Jan. 1st, 1863. fellow-men:—The day you have waited for so long has at last come. You are all free now,--or you soon will be. begun by the slave-holders to destroy the Union, extend slavery, and open the slave-trade. The North went into it to preserve the Union; and when we found that slavery would destroy the republic unless slavery should be wiped out itself, then Mr. Lincoln declared freedom to all the slaves of all the enemies of the Union. Now it has come to this, that this great war is between slavery and freedom. It has become a war for you. Now you can come into the fight, and take the field, and help wor
Xv. Those who knew and loved Mr. Lincoln as many of us did, were more disposed to sympathize with him in the deep sadness which weighed down his spirit, than to criticise his occasional facetious remarks, in which, on his account chiefly, we were so glad to hear him indulge The following extracts from our first hundred years, page 596, may illustrate the subject: The Dark in the White House.—Feb. 22, 1862.—Willie Lincoln is dead! Everybody in Washington knew Willie; and everybody wasWillie Lincoln is dead! Everybody in Washington knew Willie; and everybody was sad. Sad,—for it seemed hard for the lovely boy to be taken away so early, while the sun was just gilding the mountain up which he was pressing, and from which he could look down the sweet valley, and see so far into the future! Sad for her who held him as one of the jewels of her home-coronet; dearer than all the insignia of this world's rank. That coronet was broken, now. Its fragments might dazzle, and grace still; but it could never be the same coronet again. Sad for the master of the Ex<
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