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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Federal Navy (search)
peeding to find him in the darkness, Lieutenant Jouett nevertheless determined to board. After a thrilling encounter, he made prisoners of the crew and destroyed the schooner, returning with a loss of one killed and six wounded. When President Lincoln and his administration found themselves confronted with the most stupendous problem that any nation had had as yet to face, there was one element in their favor that counted more heavily than any other, an element whose value has been overlthe Navy Department dealt itself the severest blow that it received during the whole course of hostilities. Gideon Welles, war secretary of the Federal navy Rarely has so stupendous a task confronted a man as that which fell to the lot of Lincoln's Secretary of the Navy. In ordinary times the man fit for that office must be a statesman, a constitutional lawyer, a judge of international law and national obligations, as well as a man of sound judgment and executive ability of the highest
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Confederate Navy (search)
rchant marine. Others were used to guard the mouths of the rivers of the Confederacy, while several of them moved on the offensive in the rivers. The George Page (renamed the Richmond), a small steamer, lightly equipped, soon became well known to the Federals for its continual menacing of the forts on the Occoquan River and Quantico Creek, often advancing close and firing shells into them. Soon after the commencement of the war, the Confederate privateers became such a menace that President Lincoln issued a proclamation that all the privateers would be regarded as pirates, and that their crews and officers would be subjected to punishment as such. Six months after the issuing of this order the crew of the captured privateer Savannah was tried The General Price --a Confederate war-boat that changed hands This was one of the fourteen river-steamers condemned and seized for the Confederate Government by General Lovell at New Orleans, January 15, 1862. Converted into a war-bo
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
s recognized by the Supreme Court of the United States as being valid, and sanctioned by both municipal and international law. By the amended proclamation of President Lincoln on the 27th of April, 1861, the whole seacoast of the South Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico, from Virginia to the Rio Grande, a stretch of over three thousanst defenses were in the hands of the Confederacy. It was impossible for the navy to prevent the ingress and egress of blockade-runners under friendly guns. President Lincoln, in June, 1861, convened a board including Captain Samuel Francis Du Pont and Captain Charles H. Davis, of the navy, Major John G. Barnard, of the army, and Royal--1862 Stores at the newly captured base of the blockade was given formally, first at Hampton Roads by Flag-Officer G. J. Pendergast three days after President Lincoln had signed the proclamation declaring it. This was on the 30th of April, 1861. On the 11th of May, Captain W. W. McKean, commanding the frigate Niagara whic
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The birth of the ironclads (search)
tection. Following this foreign precedent, Lieutenant John M. Brooke, C. S. N., planned to raise the hull of the Merrimac and convert her into an ironclad of original design, which became the standard for all subsequent efforts by the naval constructors of the Confederacy. It was not till October 4, 1861, four months after the Confederacy had raised the Merrimac, that the first contracts for ironclad vessels were let by the Navy Department. For two months a naval board, appointed by President Lincoln, had been poring over various plans submitted, and finally recommended the adoption of three. A vessel of the foreign type, to be called the New Ironsides, was to be in effect a floating battery, mounting fourteen 9-inch smooth-bores in her broadsides and two 150-pounder rifles. She proved one of the most formidable vessels of her class. A small corvette, to be called the Galena, was also ordered, her sides to be plated with three-inch iron. The third was Ericsson's Monitor. s
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most famous naval action of the Civil war (search)
s, upon examining the model closely, told Bushnell that he could take the little thing home and worship it, as it would not be idolatry, because it was in the image of nothing in the heaven above or on the earth beneath or in the waters under the earth. It was not long, however, before the completed monitor became the idol of the Federal navy. One of the fighting rafts--1864 One of the fighting rafts--1864 guns in the White House before we leave this room. The cabinet, and even Mr. Lincoln himself, were much depressed. For they did not know that the only serious consequence of the great sea-fight, besides the loss of two antiquated wooden ships, would be the revolutionizing of the navies of the world. Lieutenant (afterward Captain) Parker, commander of the Beaufort, who knew the shortcomings as well as the good points of the Merrimac's construction, tells of the feeling of the day, and how moral influence in war becomes a factor in times of crises. He writes in the wor
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
so joint operations where the army played the principal part. March, 1861. March 20, 1861. Sloop Isabella, with provisions, for the Federal Navy-Yard at Pensacola, seized at Mobile by request of Gen. Bragg. April, 1861. April 17, 1861. Seizure of the U. S. transport Star of the West, at Indianola, by Texas troops under Col. Van Dorn. April 19, 1861. Ports of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas ordered blockaded by President Lincoln. April 20-21, 1861. Gosport Navy-Yard, Norfolk, Va., abandoned by Union officers in charge, and seized by Virginia State troops. April 27, 1861. Ports of Virginia and North Carolina included in the blockade. May, 1861. May 4, 1861. S. S. Star of the West made the receiving ship of the Confed. navy, New Orleans, La. May 9, 1861. U. S. ships Quaker City, Harriet Lane, Young America, Cumberland, Monticello, and Yankee enforcing the blockade off Fort Mon