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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.8 (search)
er seven of the States to the South had seceded, and after delegates from those States had visited North Carolina to induce her to secede, her people refused to call even a convention to consider the question of secession. It was not until President Lincoln called on North Carolina for her quota of troops to crush the seceding States that her determination changed. It then became evident that North Carolina must fight for her Southern sisters, or against them. The dispatch in which the Governor answered the call of President Lincoln voiced the sentiment of the whole people. Governor Ellis telegraphed that the President could get no troops in North Carolina. The die was cast, a convention was called, and on May 20, 1861, the State left the Union. North Carolina was slow in casting the die. But when this was done she entered the Confederacy with all the elan of Southern character. She was to furnish upwards of one-sixth of the whole number of men in the Confederate army; forty
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
se-worthy and purely military act, which President Lincoln would have desired him to perform had heof revenge, because of the assassination of Mr. Lincoln, and that at this juncture the generous kineneral Sherman's course. Whatever policy Mr. Lincoln might have recommended to Congress for the vision of Jefferson Davis and his cabinet. Mr. Lincoln left no room for doubt on this point, for h General Sherman had not seen this order of Mr. Lincoln's when he made his arrangement with Johnstoit is none the less absolute proof that he (Mr. Lincoln) would have disapproved the arrangement. Tely, repeatedly and solemnly rejected by President Lincoln, and better terms than the Rebels had ev same may be said, but to a less degree, of Mr. Lincoln and General Grant in their arrangement withter, following so closely upon the death of Mr. Lincoln, that I was inclined to drop everything andy week have agreed to deliver a eulogy of Mr, Lincoln at Mansfield. This over, I will gladly go to[2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
umbers which came up from every lost battlefield called out from Mr. Lincoln one of his best anecdotes. An old Illinois friend of Mr. LincolMr. Lincoln who had two sons in the Army of the Potomac, called to see him at the White House in the summer of 1862, and feeling a parental solicitudeabout the safety of his sons and their chances of success, asked Mr. Lincoln how many men he thought Jeff. Davis had in the field. Lincoln rLincoln responded that Jeff. Davis had 3,000,000 men in the field. This startled the old man. After regaining his composure he asked Mr. Lincoln how Mr. Lincoln how he knew this fact. Mr. Lincoln replied by saying, I have 1,000,000 of men in the field, and whenever one of my generals gets whipped down inMr. Lincoln replied by saying, I have 1,000,000 of men in the field, and whenever one of my generals gets whipped down in Virginia he always says that the Rebels had three men to his one. Yes, sir, I have 1,000,000 in the field and Jeff. Davis has 3,000,000. ht? At 5.40 P. M. on the 22d General Rosecrans telegraphed to Mr. Lincoln from Chattanooga that we are about 30,000 brave and determined m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the monument to the Richmond Howitzers (search)
ment by one people over another distinct people—a thing impossible with our race except as a consequence of successful war, and even then incompatible with our democratic institutions. Article of James C. Carter, in the Atlantic Monthly for October, 1882. This was what the statesmen of the South foresaw and looked courageously in the face. The success of the party ranged against them meant the government of the South by the North and for the North—the relation of victor and victim. Lincoln was the representative of opinions and interests confined to one-half of the country and pledged to an irrepressible conflict with the other. The tariff which sprang from the first throes of the convulsion gave audible warning, that one of the spoils which belonged to the victor was the taxing power of the government, to be used to throw the substance of one-half of the States into the lap of the other; the supplies of the South to be intercepted by the receipt of customs, which would div
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
here as that which influenced the men of the United States, both North and South. May we have at the head of our government as wise and far-seeing a patriot as Mr. Lincoln, and, to lead our mounted troops, as able a leader as General Forrest! A man of Forrest's characteristics is only possible in a young and partially-settled tr, Forrest at once recognized the necessity of patriotically accepting the fact that the North had won, and that the South must accept whatever terms the humane Mr. Lincoln might dictate. He published an address to the gallent men who had so long followed his plume in battle, and who were not only personally devoted to him, but thoroughly believed in him as a skillful and an eminent leader. He reminded his men that the terms granted by Mr. Lincoln were satisfactory, and manifested a spirit of magnanimity and liberality on the part of the Federal authorities. Whatever your responsibilities may be to government, to society, or to individuals, meet them lik
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General David Bullock Harris, C. S. A. (search)
een done. He visited Europe in 1848, and met in London Miss Eliza L. Knight, who became his wife in 1849. He engaged in farming at his seat, Woodville, Goochland county, Virginia, from 1845 to 1861, never relinquishing, however, his operations in tobacco at Frederick's Hall and Petersburg. He was also interested in other mercantile ventures. He, like many other Virginians, was not an original Secessionist, and hoped that the impending strife might be averted. The call, however, of President Lincoln for troops from Virginia in 1861 instantaneously decided him, and he tendered his services to the Confederacy. A command was offered him, which, from his long abandonment of military life, he felt a hesitancy in accepting. At the request of General Lee he was assigned to the Engineer corps as captain. He it was, it is said, who placed General Jackson in the position, the stern holding of which gained for him the famed soubriquet of Stonewall. He planned the fortifications of Centre