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its eventual abolition in the States themselves. As a part of the history of the controversy, he read from a speech of Lincoln in 1858, quoting his opinion that the slavery agitation would never cease till a crisis was reached and passed; that theis hate. To satisfy any mind that might doubt this proposition, he then read a few sentences from a speech delivered by Lincoln, in October, 1858, wherein he said that he always hated slavery as much as any Abolitionist; that he was always an old n the Union. A separation from the North would be a complete remedy. The Personal Liberty Bills and the election of Lincoln had much to do with the action of Georgia. The Personal Liberty bills were direct, deliberate infractions of the Consti bound by the Constitution if she chose to say so. A bargain broken on one side is broken on all sides. The election of Lincoln was the occasion Georgia chose to select. The speaker went on to show that it would be to the material, social, rel
From Charleston.special correspondence of the Dispatch. Charleston, Feb. 16, 1861. The reports of Lincoln's triumphal speeches have caused in this whole community, among even those who had hoped he had some sense, sat universal feeling of nausea and disgust-- put on account of his dark forebodings as to coercion — for that is only for buncombe --but that man, who has been called to preside over this once great nation, should prove himself such a handling — so indirect — such a whining sycophant, as to ask a great motley on vocation of all the devil's imps there gathered to pray. To pray for who and for what !That sacred devotion of a heart burdened approaching to the Great "I am," in faith and has to God, is to be the work of a great crowd of the most ungodly wretches, thirsting for the blood of the South (but too dastardly to attempt to get it,) stands and looks at this old, low-bred buffoon, and when he hypocritically calls to his motley associates, "pray for me," they w<
Majorities Ruling. In Mr. Lincoln's Pittsburg speech, he declared that majorities ought to rule, and if his policy was not liked as President, the majority ought to turn him out. According to his own rule, he ought not to be President at all, for there was a large majority of the people's vote against him. He is a minority President, a fact which ought to give him a faint conception of the idea that minorities in a constitutional republic sometimes have rights. By the way, it is fair to infer from this Pittsburg speech, that the Illinois patriarch contemplates the possibility of his re-election.--What do Seward & Co. say to that?
nk the calling of a National Convention will be pretext enough. It is rumored that Seward has resigned his place in Lincoln's Cabinet, but the rumor kicks confirmation. He is certainly disgusted at Lincoln's speeches. A letter has been reLincoln's speeches. A letter has been received here from a gentleman who has been traveling with Lincoln. The writer says that so far from Lincoln's being a nose of wax in anybody's hands, (as was asserted to me some days ago,) he is a second edition of John Brown — just as fanatical andLincoln. The writer says that so far from Lincoln's being a nose of wax in anybody's hands, (as was asserted to me some days ago,) he is a second edition of John Brown — just as fanatical and estimate. It is idle to hope that he will not be as good as his word in the matter of coercion. It turns out that Mr. Dejarnette, whose able speech on Friday last I commend to your readers, is the unwitting cause of the base fabrication startLincoln's being a nose of wax in anybody's hands, (as was asserted to me some days ago,) he is a second edition of John Brown — just as fanatical and estimate. It is idle to hope that he will not be as good as his word in the matter of coercion. It turns out that Mr. Dejarnette, whose able speech on Friday last I commend to your readers, is the unwitting cause of the base fabrication started by the New York Times about the stealing of books by Southern members. Needing a number of books for consolation and reference, he requested a friend men in his room to write an order for them. The discrepancy between the hand writing of the or<
The Daily Dispatch: February 19, 1861., [Electronic resource], The oil discoveries in Western Virginia. (search)
Lincoln's speeches. The speeches of Lincoln on his route from Springfield to Washington ought to be collected in a volume and published for the admiration of posterity. Without this, we don't believe it will be possible to convince the world Lincoln on his route from Springfield to Washington ought to be collected in a volume and published for the admiration of posterity. Without this, we don't believe it will be possible to convince the world hereafter that such a complete Sancho Panza of a fellow was ever actually elected to the Chief Magistracy of a great Republic. If such a volume should be published, accompanied by undeniable certificates of the authenticity of these speeches, it woof doom. The Inspired volume forbids us to speak "evil of dignities," and, therefore, after the 4th of March next, when Lincoln becomes one of the dignities we shall not call him a fool or an ass. His absurd utterances on the route to Washington ce We should as soon think of putting out a fire in the dome of St. Peter's with a penny squirt as to expect such a man as Lincoln to overcome the portentous difficulties that now threaten this country.--By all means let his speeches from Springfield
Refused to honor the President elect. --The Duqueane Greys, a leading military company of Pittsburg, held a meeting on the evening prior to the arrival of Mr. Lincoln at that city, and unanimously refused to take part in the formal reception accorded him.--The Greys, it will be remembered, acted as a guard of honor to the Prince of Wales on his passage through Pittsburg.
Representative men. As Southern men, we are quite willing that Lincoln and Davis should stand before the world as representative men of their two sections. But, in spite of all the wrongs and robberies which the South has suffered' from Northern abolitionism, and the fact that the North deliberately selected Lincoln as its rLincoln as its representative man, we will do it no such injustice as to avail ourselves of the advantage which its own action has placed in our hands. A section which can boast such names as O'Conner, Dickinson, Everett, Winthrop, &c., even though they cannot be elected to office, cannot be said to be entirely represented by such a person as LinLincoln, The conservative minority in the North are among the noblest of mankind. Conservatism in the South is a recommendation to official promotion and honors, and may not be always disinterested; in the North, it signs a man's political death- warrant. Yet in every city, in every town and county of every Northern State, there are
Tour of Mr. Lincoln. Receptions along the route — another speech — Nobody hurt yet — a Jas continue the rose-colored descriptions of Mr. Lincoln's reception in his tour to Washington. On it in his few remarks. At the same station Mr. Lincoln took occasion to state that during the camp At Dunkirk, while addressing the people, Mr. Lincoln, grasping the staff of the American flag, ur Hunter, of the United States Army, one of Mr. Lincoln's suite, had his shoulder dislocated. The flags. Arriving at the American Hotel, Mr. Lincoln was welcomed in a brief speech by acting Maicent reception and bid you farewell. Mr. Lincoln spoke with the utmost difficulty, being so fulfillment of a bet, conditioned, that if Mr. Lincoln was elected one party was to saw a half cor wood to the poorest negro in the city. If Mr. Lincoln was not elected the other party was to saw nt it to a Buffalo newspaper. The losing party sawed vigorously while Mr. Lincoln was speaking. [4 more...
Lincoln promises to learn. In Lincoln's Pittsburg speech he says: "I must confess I do not understand the Tariff subject in all its multiform bearings, but I promise you I will give it my closest attention and endeavor to comprehend it fully." Imagine Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun, or even an ordinary member of Congress, confessing to their constituents on their way to Washington, that they did not understand the Tariff subject, but would endeavor to comprehend it after theyLincoln's Pittsburg speech he says: "I must confess I do not understand the Tariff subject in all its multiform bearings, but I promise you I will give it my closest attention and endeavor to comprehend it fully." Imagine Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun, or even an ordinary member of Congress, confessing to their constituents on their way to Washington, that they did not understand the Tariff subject, but would endeavor to comprehend it after they got to Washington! It would be well if Abraham had nothing else to learn besides the Tariff. When he arrives at Washington, he will have to "comprehend" that "coercion" is easier to talk of than practice, and that a man of half sense can never rule in such times as these over a whole country.