Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 29, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Lincoln or search for Lincoln in all documents.

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hat the abolitionists had, in no way, backed down, be sketched their history in connection with political movements at the North, which, commencing with a comparatively small number, had constantly augmented, until it resulted in the election of Lincoln to the Presidency. He then read an extract from Lincoln's sentiments on the subject of slavery, as communicated in letters to the Republican party, and others from Seward's speeches, looking to the ultimate emancipation of slaves everywhere. TLincoln's sentiments on the subject of slavery, as communicated in letters to the Republican party, and others from Seward's speeches, looking to the ultimate emancipation of slaves everywhere. The sentiment of the North was so hostile to the institution of slavery, that it would override any barrier interposed by the Constitution. Mr. Goode argued at some length upon the general subjects advanced from the Union side of the Convention, and was occasionally "set right" by Mr. Baldwin in quoting his positions. He passed a glowing eulogium upon the course of the Virginia Senators in Congress, in regard to whom a resolution of censure had been introduced in this body. In criticising
--It is stated that Isaac Chesley, of Wheeling, has been appointed mail agent on the Hempfield Railroad; Harry Hardin, of Ritchietown, and Thos. Wilson, of Glen Easton, route agents on Baltimore Road, between Wheeling and Cumberland, and Philip Kuhn agent on the river route between Wheeling and Parkersburg.--John Terrell has been appointed postmaster at Triadelphia, and Dr. Roberts at Morgantown. It is denied that Mr. Crook, the mail agent on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, appointed by Mr. Lincoln, intends to resign.--The Charlottesville Republican, noticing the reported resignation of Crook, says, that no committee waited on Mr. Crook on his passage through Charlottesville. He was permitted to pass unmolested. But that evening a telegram was sent to Lynchburg with the request that Mr. Crook be informed that he had better not pass Charlottesville on another trip, if he consulted his personal safety. This, we suppose, was done, and hence our cotemporary may have been misled.
Washington city appointments. --The following appointments were sent into the Senate to-day: Marshal of the District of Columbia--Mr. Lammond. City Postmaster — Richard Wallach. Navy Agent--Mr. McKim. Mr. Lammond hails from Illinois, is said to be a relative of President Lincoln, and was in law partnership with him. Mr. Lammond is at present in South Carolina as the private Commissioner of the President to Gov. Pickens, and bearer of dispatches to Major Anderson. Richard Wallach, is well-known to our citizens. He has been strongly anti-Democratic, as was evidenced in the Mayoralty election, but is, notwithstanding, a popular gentleman.--Wash. States, Wednesday.