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ement of an extreme fanatical Northernism. He fancies himself, with probable truth, the best diplomatist in the whole North, imagines that his term in the State Department must come next after Seward's, and by way of attracting the attention of Lincoln's administration to himself, and of reminding the Northern public of his powers, airs his diplomacy in the widely circulating columns of the mountebank Bonner. It is Mr. Everett who suggests that the imputed dislike of the Czar for the Southe South whether the Czar be in secret her enemy in fact.--The late American Minister to Prussia brought over with him assurances of the Prussian King's sympathy with the North. We suppose the Austrian Emperor feels also somewhat warmed towards Lincoln, since the imprisonments at Forts Lafayette and McHenry, and the domiciliary barbarities practised in Baltimore. France is the strongest military power in the world; Great Britain the strongest naval power, and the English people the freest in
The Daily Dispatch: November 1, 1861., [Electronic resource], Attack on the British Minister in Japan. (search)
Gen. Fremont. --Nothing is more pleasing to a generous mind than to make amends for an set of injustice. It has been intimated in this paper that Gen. Fremont was deficient in the cardinal quality of a soldier — courage Events have proved that this was an unfounded imputation. We observe with pleasure, since it appeared, that Gen. Fremont has challenged a member of a church. Nothing could be more heroical and chivalries no act could give us clearer comprehension of Gen. Fremont than this act. With such a field as Missouri affords of locking horns with acknowledged fighting men. Gen. Fremont es into the first "Christian" he can find, and backs him out quicker an lightning. It was a wonderful feat, and one which cavaliers of the Fremont order especially glory in. He need not lament now that Lincoln has recalled him to Washington. He has performed a deed which will give him a place in history, and prove that he is a worthy son of an illustrious sire.
wounded, and missing, was estimated this morning, when General McClellan left, at 625 men, of whom 79 are thought to have been killed, and 120 wounded. Gen. Stone telegraphs this evening, however, that many of the missing are coming in — The Sergeant-Major, and a Captain of the Massachusetts 15th, at first reported lost, have returned. The Bulletins of the Leesburg battle. From the Maryland News Sheet, of the 26th, published in Baltimore, (which, by-the-way, does not fully endorse Lincoln's Administration, as we had supposed since the change of proprietors and name of the journal,) we copy the following: The battle of Leesburg, or Ball's Bluff, as it is now called, exceeds, if that be possible, the battle of Bull Run in the variety of reports that have been made concerning it — officially and otherwise — and in the diametrically opposite conclusions that the Government telegraphers and the Northern journalists and their correspondents have come to concerning it. It has <
wounded, and missing, was estimated this morning, when General McClellan left, at 625 men, of whom 79 are thought to have been killed, and 120 wounded. Gen. Stone telegraphs this evening, however, that many of the missing are coming in — The Sergeant-Major, and a Captain of the Massachusetts 15th, at first reported lost, have returned. The Bulletins of the Leesburg battle. From the Maryland News Sheet, of the 26th, published in Baltimore, (which, by-the-way, does not fully endorse Lincoln's Administration, as we had supposed since the change of proprietors and name of the journal,) we copy the following: The battle of Leesburg, or Ball's Bluff, as it is now called, exceeds, if that be possible, the battle of Bull Run in the variety of reports that have been made concerning it — officially and otherwise — and in the diametrically opposite conclusions that the Government telegraphers and the Northern journalists and their correspondents have come to concerning it. It has <