Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 11, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Lincoln or search for Lincoln in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

n. The deserters still think that we shall have no fight at Chattanooga. Important news from the army may be expected. Five gentlemen, composing the Relief Committee of Lawrence, make the statement that the dispatch recently sent from Kansas City to the Associated Press, asserting that a large amount of goods and money, and a number of horses taken by Quantrell had been recovered and returned, is unfounded. Of the horses stolen only three have been returned, and the value of the merchandize recovered will not exceed one hundred dollars. A dispatch from Fortress Monroe, dated the 5th, says: Dr. Wright was recently tried before a military commission for shooting Lieut. Sanborn while the latter was drilling negro troops in Norfolk, and the result of the investigation was forwarded to the President for his decision. We learn to-day that President Lincoln has ordered a final trial, but whether it is before a military or civil tribunal has not yet been determined.
fices mobbed. Raleigh, Sept. 10. --Some soldiers of Bennings's brigade, apparently led by officers, mobbed the Standard newspaper office last night about 10 o'clock, destroying the furniture and throwing the types in the street. They also destroyed a lot of State printing, &c. Gov. Vance reached the spot after the work of destruction was nearly over, and addressed the crowd, begging them to desist. He rebuked them for the act, telling them that no such example had been set in Lincoln's dominions. The soldiers cheered Governor Vance and dispersed at one o'clock, and left the city. The building and power press of the office were not damaged, and Mr. Holden will resume the publication of the Standard in a few days. This morning, about 7 o'clock, some one rung the town bell, and a crowd of citizens gathered and rushed upon the State Journal office, turning the contents into the streets, breaking up furniture, &c. The Mayor was sent for, but arrived too late to st
sell at from three to four thousand dollars each. Upwards of a hundred thousand slaves have arrived from Louisiana and Mississippi. Planters and speculators are going beyond Shreveport to purchase or hire. Good beef on the foot sells at eight cents per pound; vegetables are cheap; cattle bring thirty dollars a head; coffee thirty-five cents per pound; silver five dollars in currency at Brownsville, Texas. Planters are cheerfully according tithes to the Government. Thirty-two of Lincoln's Louisiana overseers are at Huntsville, to be sent to Eagle Pass for their liberation. The country in that region is a desert. Foolish reports are spread through Texas like wildfire. It is reported that President Davis and Gen. Bragg are both dead, and that Gen. Lee has been superceded. Gen. Taylor is in great repute. Pendleton has been elected Governor by a small majority. Herbert, Sexton, and Branch are elected to Congress. Military matters are quiet. The people and t