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William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 650 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 172 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 156 0 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 154 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 78 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 68 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 64 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 52 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 50 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for A. Lincoln or search for A. Lincoln in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

Doc. 55.-re-organization of Arkansas. The following are the instructions of President Lincoln to General Steele in reference to the reorganization of Arkansas: Executive mansion, Washington, Jan. 20, 1864. Major-General Steele: Sundry citizens of the State of Arkansas petition me that an election may be held in that State, at which to elect a Governor; that it be assumed at that election, and thenceforward, that the Constitution and laws of the State, as before the rebellion, are in full force, except that the Constitution is so modified as to declare that there shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except in the punishment of crimes, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted; that the General Assembly may make such provisions for the freed people as shall recognize and declare their permanent freedom and provide for their education, and which may yet be construed as a temporary arrangement, suitable to their present condition as a laboring, landles
if the enemy gets possession of your country? What are your rights in the hands and under the control of the minions of Lincoln? You must choose between our own people and our own government, and the people and the government of your enemy. There hope to what has been termed the conservative element of the North, and expect to be preserved and protected by it from Lincoln's power and dominion? Banish the fatal delusion. Conservatism at the North lies prostrate in the dust. In their mad ethey have lost their own. They are as powerless to aid you as they are to protect themselves. You must either submit to Lincoln and abolitionism, or, by your own unaided arm, with the blessing of a kind Providence, win your liberty and your indepenion and the Union as they were, even if you were prepared to accept it. You must either be freemen or you must submit to Lincoln, and he has given you his terms. I put the picture before you. Do you stagger before it, or does it arouse within you
ille, Magnolia, and Pilatka, and that Henry's mounted forces should be kept moving as circumstances might justify or require. This is my plan of present operations. A raid to tear up the railroad west of Lake City will be of service, but I have no intention to occupy now that part of the State. Very respectfully, etc., Q. A. Gillmore, Major-General Commanding. Headquarters of the army, Washington, March 16, 1864. Robert N. Scott, Captain Fourth U. S. Infantry, A. D. C. President Lincoln's letter. Executive mansion, Washington, January 13, 1864. Major-General Gillmore: I understand an effort is being made by some worthy gentlemen to reconstruct a legal State government in Florida. Florida is in your department, and it is not unlikely that you may be there in person. I have given Mr. Hay a commission of Major, and sent him to you with some blank books and other blanks, to aid in the reconstruction. He will explain as to the manner of using the blanks, and also