hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 1,765 1 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 1,301 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 947 3 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 914 0 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 776 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 495 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 485 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 456 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 410 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 405 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America.. You can also browse the collection for Abraham Lincoln or search for Abraham Lincoln in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 2 document sections:

snow on the ground. The bringing up of Abraham Lincoln was also, I suppose, much on this wise; aery. Grant himself was not for attacking it; Lincoln was not. They, and the North in general, wishes the greatest nation upon earth. In 1860 Lincoln was elected President, and the catastrophe, w majority, and he was glad, therefore, to see Lincoln elected. Secession was imminent, and with seells us, until after the battle of Shiloh. Lincoln was not to come into office until the spring ght to coerce the South. It was unsafe for Mr. Lincoln, when he went to be sworn into office in Mad at that time of ever saving the Union; President Lincoln never himself lost faith in the final trhich the Confederates were threatening. President Lincoln, who had daily, almost hourly, been tele when the war began three years before. President Lincoln told Grant, when he first saw him in priered to Sherman in North Carolina. President Lincoln visited Richmond, which had been occupied by
Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America., IV: civilization in the United States. (search)
, though he has not the high mental distinction of Pericles or Caesar, has true distinction of style and character. But these men belong to the pre-American age. Lincoln's recent American biographers declare that Washington is but an Englishman, an English officer; the typical American, they say, is Abraham Lincoln. Now Lincoln iAbraham Lincoln. Now Lincoln is shrewd, sagacious, humorous, honest, courageous, firm; he is a man with qualities deserving the most sincere esteem and praise, but he has not distinction. In truth, everything is against distinction in America, and against the sense of elevation to be gained through admiring and respecting it. The glorification of the averageLincoln is shrewd, sagacious, humorous, honest, courageous, firm; he is a man with qualities deserving the most sincere esteem and praise, but he has not distinction. In truth, everything is against distinction in America, and against the sense of elevation to be gained through admiring and respecting it. The glorification of the average man, who is quite a religion with statesmen and publicists there, is against it. The addiction to the funny man, who is a national misfortune there, is against it. Above all, the newspapers are against it. It is often said that every nation has the government it deserves. What is much more certain is that every nation has the