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William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 1,765 1 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 1,301 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 947 3 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 914 0 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 776 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 495 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 485 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 456 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 410 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 405 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Abraham Lincoln or search for Abraham Lincoln in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 7 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 8: little Sammy: the Civil War 1859-1863; aet. 40-44 (search)
ences; and when he came to that night in Libby Prison, he sang the Battle Hymn once more. The effect was magical: people shouted, wept, and sang, all together; and when the song was ended, above the tumult of applause was heard the voice of Abraham Lincoln, exclaiming, while the tears rolled down his cheeks,-- Sing it again! (Our mother met Lincoln in 1861, and was presented to him by Governor Andrew. After greeting the party, the President seated himself so near the famous portraLincoln in 1861, and was presented to him by Governor Andrew. After greeting the party, the President seated himself so near the famous portrait of Washington by Gilbert Stuart as naturally to suggest some comparison between the two figures. On the canvas we saw the calm presence, the serene assurance of the man who had successfully accomplished a great undertaking, a vision of health and of peace. In the chair beside it sat a tall, bony figure, devoid of grace, a countenance almost redeemed from plainness by two kindly blue eyes, but overshadowed by the dark problems of the moment... When we had left the presence, one of our n
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: no. 13
Chestnut Street
, Boston 1864; aet. 45 (search)
e conditions of camps and hospitals, in Massachusetts and at the seat of war; he worked as hard on the Sanitary Commission, to which he had been appointed by President Lincoln, as on any other of his multifarious labors: his knowledge of practical warfare and his grasp of situations gave him a foresight of coming events which seemetely periods, Dr. Holmes's sparkling verse; to describe General Grant, the prize ox, white as driven snow and weighing 3900 pounds, presented by the owner to President Lincoln and by him to the fair. Did we not see him drawn in triumph through Boston streets on an open car, and realize in an instant-fresh from our Wonder-book --whaper. we must content ourselves with this dispatch:-- Allow me to wish you a great success. With the old fame of the navy made bright by the present war, you cannot fail. I name none lest I wrong others by omission. To all, from Rear Admiral to honest Jack, I tender the nation's admiration and gratitude. A. Lincoln.
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4:
241 Beacon Street
: the New Orleans Exposition 1883-1885; aet. 64-66 (search)
lovely place it was. He is buried above ground in a sort of edifice formed of brick, the rows of coffins being laid on stone floors, each single one divided from those on either side of it by a stone partition. Francis Marion Ward, died September 3rd, 1847. Erected by William Morse, dear Marion's friend. May 16. Gave my talk to the colored people, soon after two in the afternoon in their department. A pretty hexagonal platform had been arranged. Behind this was a fine portrait of Abraham Lincoln, with a vase of beautiful flowers [gladiolus and white lilies] at its base. I spoke of Dr. Channing, Garrison, Theodore Parker, Charles Sumner, John A. Andrew, Lucretia Mott, and Wendell Phillips, occupying about an hour. They gave me a fine basket of flowers and sang my Battle Hymn. Afterwards the Alabama cadets visited us. We gave them tea, cake and biscuits and I made a little speech for them. Winter and spring passed rapidly, each season bringing fresh interest. The picturesq
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
w owned by eight companies in the city. June 24. The lunch at Lady Aberdeen's was very pleasant. Mrs. Eva McLaren Author of Civil Rights of Women. talked with me, as did Miss Ferguson. The American Minister, Robert Lincoln, Son of Abraham Lincoln. was introduced to me and was very friendly. June 25. Went to Toynbee Hall by Whitechapel 'bus. Had received a note, which I supposed to be from a lady, offering to show me over the institution. We were shown into a large room, bare of se and garden. He met us very cordially. Mrs. Smalley came. She was Wendell Phillips's adopted daughter. I had a pleasant talk with her and with Mr. and Mrs. Hughes, whom I charged with a friendly message to Thomas himself. After this to Minister Lincoln's Fourth of July reception. Harry White, Daisy Rutherford's husband, was introduced. Elsewhere she says of this visit to Alma-Tadema:-- His charming wife, once seen, explains some of the features of his works. She has yellow hair of
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: looking toward sunset 1903-1905; aet. 84-86 (search)
-86 In music hall Looking down upon the white heads of my contemporaries Beneath what mound of snow Are hid my springtime roses? How shall Remembrance know Where buried Hope reposes? In what forgetful heart As in a canton darkling, Slumbers the blissful art That set my heaven sparkling? What sense shall never know, Soul shall remember; Roses beneath the snow, June in November. J. W. H. The year 1903 began with the celebration at Faneuil Hall of the fortieth anniversary of Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. She was one of the speakers. I felt much the spirit of the occasion, and spoke, I thought, better than usual, going back to the heroic times before and during the war, and to the first celebration forty years ago, at which I was present. Work of all kinds poured in, the usual steady stream. January 6. Wrote a new circular for Countess. Who the Countess was, or what the circular was about, is not known. By this time it had become the custom (or so it se
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 15: mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord 1908-1910; aet. 89-91 (search)
andel wrote parts of the Messiah in heaven itself. Where else could he have got Comfort ye, Thy rebuke, Thou shalt break them, and much besides? Late in December, 1908, came the horror of the Sicilian earthquake. She felt at first that it was impossible to reconcile omnipotence and perfect benevolence with this catastrophe. We must hold judgment in suspense and say, We don't and we can't understand. She had several tasks on hand this winter, among them a poem for the Centenary of Lincoln's birth. On February 7 she writes:-- After a time of despair about the poem for the Lincoln Centenary some lines came to me in the early morning. I arose, wrapped myself warmly, and wrote what I could, making quite a beginning. She finished the poem next day, and on the 12th she went with three handsome grandchildren to deliver it at Symphony Hall before the Grand Army of the Republic and their friends. The police had to make an entrance for us. I was presently conducted to my se
4, 194, 204, 225-27, 235, 249-51, 254, 296. Layard, Sir, Henry, II, 44. Leavenworth, I, 382. Lee, Mrs., II, 200. Lee, Harry, II, 233. Lee, R. E., I, 213, 219, 274; II, 353, 354. Lefranc, Abel, II, 374. Leigh Smith, Miss, II, 239, 243, 252, 254. Leland, C. G., I, 328; I, 50. Leo XIII, II, 241-43. Leoni, Sig., II, 295, 296. Lesnian, II, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18. Lexington, I, 256, 259; II, 193, 194. Libby Prison, I, 188, 189. Lieber, Francis, I, 240. Lincoln, Abraham, I, 189, 195, 211, 212, 220, 221, 228, 274; II, 108, 308, 387. Lincoln, R. T., II, 166, 168. Lippitt, Gov., II, 221. Listener, I, 162-64. Liszt, Franz, I, 270. Littlehale, M. F., II, 324. Livermore, Mary A., II, 18, 20, 125, 229. Liverpool, I, 280; II, 69, 164. Livy, I, 202, 227, 228. Loch Katrine, I, 92. Locke, W. J., II, 386. Lodge, H. C., II, 304. Lodge, Mrs. H. C., II, 304. Loisy, Abbe, II, 325. Lombroso, Cesar, II, 285. London, I, 81, 26