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William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 1,765 1 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 1,301 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 947 3 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 914 0 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 776 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 495 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 485 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 456 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 410 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 405 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Abraham Lincoln or search for Abraham Lincoln in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.48 (search)
ormer years so strenuously contended, that the States entering into the Federal compact had surrendered absolutely and irrevocably the sovereign powers delegated to the Federal Government. There was, indeed, up to the very commencement of hostilities, no settled conviction on this subject, even in the North, contrary to the historic view of it, which prevailed almost unanimously in the South. As Mr. Henderson, in his most admirable work (Stonewall Jackson, Vol. I., page 117), says: Mr. Lincoln's predecessor in the presidential chair had publicly proclaimed that coercion was both illegal and inexpedient; and for the three months which intervened between the secession of South Carolina and the inauguration of the Republican President, the Government made not the slightest attempt to interfere with the peaceable establishment of the new Confederacy. Nota single soldier reinforced the garrisons of the military posts in the South. Not a single regiment was recalled from the Wester
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.53 (search)
n higher. Mirabile dictu! There were but fifteen millions of dollars represented by the bonds, yet the bids aggregated $625,000,000. It is evident that more than $15,000,000 could have been gotten. Erlanger came to this country and from President Lincoln at Washington obtained a pass to Richmond — for Lincoln did not know Erlanger or suspect his mission. The foreigners communicated with President Davis and Mr. Memminger and urged them to make a larger issue of cotton bonds. He was receiveLincoln did not know Erlanger or suspect his mission. The foreigners communicated with President Davis and Mr. Memminger and urged them to make a larger issue of cotton bonds. He was received indifferently by Mr. Davis, who had learned to rely on Mr. Memminger's excellent judgment. The latter declared that the Confederate Congress authorized him to borrow but $15,000,000 and he could not exceed its instructions. Erlanger was thus unseccessful. He declared that the South should get all the foreign money possible. Get them interested financially in your success or failure, and they will force their government to recognize the Confederacy as a government, and its subjects as be
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.64 (search)
, Hopkins, William, Harper, John, Judy, D., Jones, H. C., Johnson, Charles, Jacobs, George, Jones, Sam, Johnson, Fisher, Johnson, John, Kiracoffe, Nelson, Ketterman, H., Lobb, Robert, Lynn, John, Md.; Lynn, Sprigg, Md.; Long, J. R., Larey, M., Luke, William, Md.; Logan, Loyd, Liggett, Robert, Mason, J. H., Markwood, John, Martin, Taylor, Maloney, William, Marginnis, J., Mountz, J. D., Md.; Markwood, George, Magalis, William, Michael, J., McKaig, John, Md.; Moore, Sam, Miller, Simon, Moupin, Lincoln, Mace, John, Mason, J. H., Miller, Charles, Martin, William, Miller, Rader, Miller, James, Mills, Reuben, Miles, William, Michael, Isaac, Neville, Thornton, Norris, William, O'Haver, Martin, Overman, John, O'Rouke, John, Parker, Joseph A., Poole, William, Painter, N. B., Pennybacker, J. E., Pennybacker, Isaac, Reed, John, Ritter, Henry, Richardson, John, Rinker, William, Rogers, John, Rhodes, O. L., Richards, B. F., Robinson, I. N., Rosser, Robert, Shaffer, Sam, Smith, John, Showalter, John
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.65 (search)
ood and put into practice in the Southern States. On the other hand, it is impossible to admit that Governor Allen should have brooded over such a scheme as I have stated had he not conceived at least the possibility of its adoption, and this points to the conclusion that the leading minds in the South were, to his knowledge, very far from identifying slavery, in the abstract, with the Confederate cause. In corroboration of this inference I would recall: 1. A proclamation of President Abraham Lincoln, issued at the beginning of the war. In it he tried to bribe the Southern States back into the Union by the promise of the maintenance of slavery, and failed. 2. A speech by President Jefferson Davis, delivered, I believe, in 1864, and at Atlanta, Ga. In it he expressed the following sentiments (I quote from memory): There are some who talk of a return to the Union with slavery maintained, but who would thus sacrifice honor to interest. With this quotation I will close my nar