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William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 1,765 1 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 1,301 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 947 3 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 914 0 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 776 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 495 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 485 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 456 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 410 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 405 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 7, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Abraham Lincoln or search for Abraham Lincoln in all documents.

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thern sisters forced. Mr. Flournoy passed a severe criticism upon Lincoln's Inaugural. the Peace Conference. A communication was r Mr. Thornton, of Prince Edward, made an eloquent speech, in which Lincoln's Inaugural, in its various parts, was subjected to an unlimited eConstitutional remedies should be still resorted to. He repudiated Lincoln's Inaugural, but believed precipitate action here would not meet t for action. Mr. Goode proceeded to give the Inaugural Address of Lincoln a raking broadside, and drew a vivid contrast between the Illinoisd resist coercion to the death. The first at tempt on the part of Lincoln, in that direction, would light up the fire of civil war in every ark and portentous; scarcely a ray of hope illumines it. (Abraham Lincoln)--that he in that address declares his right to coerce the seceded States, (Abraham Lincoln)--that he in that address declares his right to coerce the seceded States, and makes it a matter of policy, sub
ican Association, numbering some two hundred men, cut an extensive figure. Suel a collection of vite faces I never saw. Lincoln sat in an open carriage next to Buchan an, with Senators Pearce and Baker on the front seat. As he passed Brown's, he lels the South to go to war, and the sooner it begins the better. Federalists generally, from both sections, sustain Lincoln in this course. From their point of view, he is right. But from the same point it is evidently his duty to begin the ficy. By placing the Government in the attitude of an assailed party, the Border States are compelled to take sides with Lincoln or become traitors. I suppose you will not find a genuine Union-loving, law-abiding, Convention-worshipping Virginian, r Department. Mr. John Bell has signified his willingness to take a place, and I think he will get one. The pressure on Lincoln for and against Chase has been so great that on Sunday it is said he burst into tears and exclaimed, "My God! gentlemen
The Cabinet. The construction of Lincoln's Cabinet is enough to open the eyes of the most credulous. Not a member of the Conservative Union party in it! Chash, the ferocious political brigand, whose blunder bus is pointed at the heart of the South, divides in the Inaugural the honors with Seward, the midnight assassin. Both are in the Cabinet, and all have been unanimously confirmed, except the two Republicans who happened to be born in slave States, a crime unpardonable in the eyes of a portion of the Senate. And still we have the syren cry of peace, peace, while already the clanking of our chains comes on every Northern breeze.
The million Appropriation bill. The bill appropriating one million of dollars for the defence of the State, which passed the House of Delegates at the beginning of the session, is still hung in the Senate. With the distinet declaration of coercion in Lincoln's Inaugural, and the unanimous declaration of the Virginia Legislature that Virginia will resist coercion, the bill putting the State in a condition of defence is permitted to sleep, and the Common wealth remains at the mercy of invaders.
On the 1st of January there were over 8,000 Americans in Paris, many of whom are permanent residents. George P Criswell recently died near Mount Vernon, Mich., of congestion of the brain, superinduced by a violent tooth-ache. Hon. Martin J. Crawford. Commissioner from the Southern Confederacy, arrived at Washington Tuesday evening. A little boy died at Hartford. Conn., on Monday, from eating the phosphorous from the ends of matches. Lincoln was burnt in effigy at Hampden Sidney College. Va., on the 4th inst., amid a "calithumpian" serenade.
our political drama has been enacted, and, like anxious spectators, who have viewed each rise of the curtain with mingled feelings, while eagerly awaiting the grand climax, we are ready to exclaim, "What comes next? " The inaugural address of Mr. Lincoln has greatly elated the friends of immediate secession — embodying, as it does, those coercive measures which they predict will unite the whole South; while a corresponding depression has been produced upon the minds of the Unionists. The y, Captain; R. W. Saunders, 1st Lieutenant; Wm. Steptoe, 2d Lieutenant Mr. Harris is a distinguished graduate of the V. M. Institute, and is fully qualified to fill with great credit and honor to himself the position to which he has been called. The military spirit is rapidly increasing here. There are several other companies that are being organized, and will soon be ready to show Mr. Lincoln that somebody will be hurt, if not now, should he attempt to retake those Southern forts. Alpha
The Daily Dispatch: March 7, 1861., [Electronic resource], Arrival of Weston, the Boston Pedestrian. (search)
Arrival of Weston, the Boston Pedestrian. --Edward. P. Weston, the young man who was to walk from Boston to Washington if Mr. Lincoln was elected, arrived in this city yesterday at half-past 4 P. M. He complained somewhat of being sore and weak, and declares he would not undertake the journey again over such roads for any sum of money. His walking dress was a pair of blue woolen knit drawers, fitting tight to the limbs, and a blue coat with brass buttons. He states that three horses were worn out on the way by the "committee" of two who accompanied him to see the job done, and one of the gentlemen was compelled to take the cars at the Annapolis junction and came to this city by railway. Weston applied at the Clarendon House for rooms, but being full they directed him to a boarding-house, and at night, accompanied by the Massachusetts delegation, he attended the inauguration ball. He has rather a youthful appearance, is of light complexion, and weighs about 145 pounds. Probab
t array of beauty and fashion.--One of the ladies is represented to have been attired in two thousand dollars' worth of laces and twenty thousand dollars' worth of diamonds. At 12 ¼o'clock the quadrille of the evening was danced-- Douglas and Mrs. Lincoln, Hamlin and Miss Edwards, Mayor Berret and Mrs. Bergman, Mr. Harrard and Mrs. Baker composing the set. Miss Edwards, niece of Mrs. Lincoln, was acknowledged to be the belle of the evening. The ladies of the Presidential party were, according e of the ladies is represented to have been attired in two thousand dollars' worth of laces and twenty thousand dollars' worth of diamonds. At 12 ¼o'clock the quadrille of the evening was danced-- Douglas and Mrs. Lincoln, Hamlin and Miss Edwards, Mayor Berret and Mrs. Bergman, Mr. Harrard and Mrs. Baker composing the set. Miss Edwards, niece of Mrs. Lincoln, was acknowledged to be the belle of the evening. The ladies of the Presidential party were, according to Jenkins, dressed exquisitely.
South bring us comments on the Inaugural of Mr. Lincoln. Below we give some extracts from them, tot. With regard to the ultimate projects of Mr. Lincoln, the public is no wiser than before. It is to enforce it. [From the World.] Mr. Lincoln has been long enough in Washington to show and appreciate such a character as that of Mr. Lincoln will doubt that this spirit will mark everys him on the very threshold of his office. Mr. Lincoln's Address is remarkable for its directness,ing completely satisfied, without saying "Abraham Lincoln is right; he has said just what he ought trued offensively. The question with which Mr. Lincoln had to deal was not whether secession is cog Virginian.] The purpose enunciated by Mr. Lincoln, to enforce the Federal laws in the secededdental majority — and that is the result of Mr. Lincoln's inaugural, if acted out in the shaping ofout by the troops of Carolina. That President Lincoln will attempt to collect revenue off the [3 more...]
in influencing the recent elections in the Border States, and throwing dust in the eyes of the Bankers, Capital-1sts and Merchants of the Northern cities, who subscribed to Government loans on the assurance that Peace, and not War, was to be the Lincoln policy, the mask is thrown off, and lo! these conservative politicians are now hand and glove with the Chases, the Blairs, the Trumbulls, the Hales, the Fessendens. and other men of notoriously extreme views, as if defeat the very measures of aected, the arsenal recaptured, the forts reinforced, and all the broken mashinery of the Federal Government replaced by sword and bayonet --with no olive branch to after — then the country may as well understand, first as last, that the inauguration of Mr. Lincoln to-day is the inauguration of civil war, and the death-knell of the Union." All this the Inaugural has done, and yet while the death-knell is booming solemnly and heavily upon every ear, there are those who cry, Peace! Peace!
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