Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 31, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Abram Lincoln or search for Abram Lincoln in all documents.

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ty-five, comes out in a card this morning in the Transcript, disclaiming disloyalty to Virginia. Hear him: "Messrs. Editors: I see in your paper my name as one of the men that voted against secession. In voting against secession, I did not consider it voting against the State of Virginia--that I should be called disloyal to the State. In no single instance have I ever transgressed the laws of my nativity, and no man will do more to aid Virginia than myself. I am no supporter of Lincoln, having in the Presidential election voted for John Bell. Besides, I am a native-born Virginian, and have never been North to be imbued with Northern principles; neither have I ever read the Black Republican platform. I know nothing of their politics. "By giving this a place in your columns, you will oblige, Yours respectfully, "Wm. Wakefield. "Portsmouth, May 28, 1861." There is nothing more of public interest occurring here. Old Dominion P. S.--I hear that a
From Norfolk.the Hampton affair — Lincoln's troops in possession — false Alarms, &c.[special Correspondence of the Dispatch.] Norfolk, Va., May 29th, 1861. That a landing by the Federal forces has been made at Newport News, I think is beyond question From Sunday until yesterday, it is thought about three thousand were put ashore at this point, where they are engaged in erecting an effective battery. Five or six ships have been seen frequently in that direction, and it is surmised that this, after all, must have been the main object of their visit. On Sunday afternoon, I learn, they visited the house of a farmer in the neighborhood, and demanded of him all the negroes he had, saying that they were wanted to work, and that when they were done with them they would be returned; and, no doubt these negroes are made to work hard day and night for these villains, which may account for the rapid progress of their battery. Certainly this is an unwarrantable invasion of our soi
respondence of the Richmond Dispatch.Old Hanover — the Dispatch — the crops. Pisgah, Hanover, May 27th, 1861. I have never troubled you in asking a space in your columns, but seeing so many farmers speaking and writing of their good crops, I cannot refrain this evening from writing and asking a publication in that good old Dispatch of Richmond. Old Hanover is all right — her noble sons are falling into the line of battle every day, to fight for their liberties and rights. She has now in service three companies of volunteers, &c., one of cavalry. Capt. Wm. Wingfield is also forming another company. The crops are looking as finely as I ever saw them in my life. The corn crops are late, but good, and the wheat crops will average a third more than it did last year. There will not be much fruit, but I presume enough to supply your markets. You can judge from this whether Lincoln will starve the South out in sixty days or not, as he predicted he would. W. E
. Seward replied that he was well aware of the fact that there no longer existed any such party, but that he was determined to test the question whether the U. S. Government could be overthrown or not. The same member of Congress also saw Mr. Lincoln and repeated to him substantially the same statement of Southern unity he had made to Mr. Seward, to which Mr. Lincoln replied that he was well aware the South is now a unit, but that the North had the power to crush it, and was determined to replied that he was well aware of the fact that there no longer existed any such party, but that he was determined to test the question whether the U. S. Government could be overthrown or not. The same member of Congress also saw Mr. Lincoln and repeated to him substantially the same statement of Southern unity he had made to Mr. Seward, to which Mr. Lincoln replied that he was well aware the South is now a unit, but that the North had the power to crush it, and was determined to do it.
Navy Department, May 15, 1861. Sir: Your letter of the 23d April, tendering your resignation as a Lieutenant in the Navy has been received. By order of the President of the United States, your name has been stricken from the rolls of the Navy from that date. Very respectfully yours, [Signed] Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Mr. Hunter Davidson, Late Lieutenant U. S. Navy. Ordnance Department, Norfolk (Va Navy-Yard, May 23, 1861. Abram Lincoln, Esq., President of the late United States: Sir: I have just received a communication from your Secretary of the Navy, stating that you had directed that my name should be stricken from the rolls of that service. Herewith you will find that communication returned. Be pleased to accept my thanks for the courteous manner in which you have acted touching my resignation. I am sure that the ten millions of freemen, whose principles and cause I have expensed, will appreciate the motives which induced