hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 2 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 33 results in 8 document sections:

The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 85 (search)
thstanding our works had been so poorly constructed as to have been entirely torn to pieces and demolished by the shot and shell from the enemy's guns. These were at once fitted up and embrasures put in by the company. On the 28th and 29th and 30th instant the battery was more or less engaged with good effect. On the evening of the 30th it was relieved and placed in camp by order of Captain Bridges. The casualties during this engagement were Privates George Scott, Michael Crawley and James Lindsay, wounded slightly; Isaac Houghtaling and Caleb B. Beers, wounded severely by musket-balls. Four horses were killed, 2 wounded, and 2 caisson wheels disabled. Every effort was required to save men from the enemy's sharpshooters, for they were active and well posted. On the 8th of June, while foraging, Corpl. George S. Brown and Private John Hannifer, with Privates Elias Collingwood, detailed from the Sixth Ohio Battery, and William Tandy, of the Fifteenth Ohio Infantry, were capture
Commons a debate took place on the following motion submitted by Mr. Lindsay: That, in the opinion of this House, the States which hav attention of her Majesty's government. In making this motion Mr. Lindsay said he felt assured that an expression of opinion on the part oe motion. Mr. Taylor, who had given notice of an amendment to Mr. Lindsay's motion, to leave out all the words after the words House, in oy existing in the republic of the United States, said he thought Mr. Lindsay had not acted prudently in disregarding the suggestion of an hon mediator should be considered a friend to both parties; whereas Mr. Lindsay had avowed his partiality for the South. Then, if the offer of it would be a cowardly proceeding on their part, and he thought Mr. Lindsay deserved well of the country in giving the government an opportu the struggle was creating not only in America but in Europe. Mr. Lindsay then asked the permission of the House to withdraw his motion, o
January 27. Bloomfield, Mo., was visited by a party of the Sixty-eighth Missouri militia, under the command of Colonel James Lindsay, and a large number of rebel guerrillas were driven out of the town, with a loss of fifty-two prisoners, seventy horses with their trappings, and nearly one hundred stand of arms. The Unionists met with no loss.--Col. Lindsay's Despatch. Fort McAllister, on Genesis Point, Great Ogeechee River, Ga., was attacked by the ironclad monitor Montauk, under tCol. Lindsay's Despatch. Fort McAllister, on Genesis Point, Great Ogeechee River, Ga., was attacked by the ironclad monitor Montauk, under the command of Captain John L. Worden, three gunboats, and a mortar-schooner, but after a bombardment of many hours' duration, they failed to reduce it.--Savannah News. A. D. Boileau, the proprietor of the Philadelphia Evening Journal, was this day arrested by order of the National Government and taken to Washington.--An enthusiastic Union demonstration took place at Fayetteville, Ark.--Captain Williamson of General Weitzel's brigade, had a fight with a small body of rebel troops at Indian V
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
as married to Nancy Galbreath, who died in 1889. J. S. Guy J. S. Guy, of Lowreyville, a veteran of the Sixth regiment, was born in Chester county, in 1836. His father, William Guy, Sr., a prosperous farmer of the same county, was the son of Samuel Guy, a native of Pennsylvania who came to South Carolina in 1756, and served with honor in the war of the Revolution against the British, and in the snow campaign against the Cherokee Indians. His mother was Eliza Lindsay, daughter of James Lindsay, who came to the State from Ireland in a ship from Cork after peace followed the Revolution. Mr. Guy entered the service of the State early in 1861 as a private of the Calhoun Guards, of Chester county, and was on duty at Charleston when Sumter was first bombarded. His company became part of the Sixth volunteers, and with it he went to Virginia, reaching Manassas Junction on the eve of the great battle of July, 1861. He took part in the affair at Dranesville, and in 1862 was in the ba
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Terry's Brigade, formerly John M. Jones's. (search)
30th N. C. Infantry. J. M. Douglas, Co. G, 21st Ga. Infantry. J. D. Wilks, Co. H, 3d Ark. Infantry. R. Vernon, Co. D, 20th Ga. Infantry. Corporal A. J. Henderson, Co. K, 26th Ga. Infantry. Private W. H. Baldwin, Co. C, 31st Ga. Infantry. J. L. Green, Co. H, 28th N. C. Infantry. [103] Report of men on duty in Ordnance Reserve Department, and detached from their respective commands, viz: George F. Apperson, Co. F, 6th Va. Cavalry. William C. Apperson, Co. F, 6th Va. Cavalry. James Lindsay, Co. B, 11th Va. Infantry. Thomas Lawton, Co. C, 4th Va. Infantry. John M. Small, Co. E, 2d Va. Infantry. Jesse W. Lassiter, Co. H, 38th N. C. Troops. James C. Baughn, Brown's Batt. McGregor's Artillery. George Dallas Baughn, Brown's Batt. McGregor's Artillery. [8] Report of extra duty men in Medical Purveyor's Department who have not been reported in their Company rolls, but are present for duty. Private N. C. Summers, Co. C, 4th N. C. Regiment, Q.-M. Sergeant.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
t 28, 1895, when all the surviving members of the Fourteenth will be brought together again. The members of the companies represented were mostly from Rockbridge and Augusta Counties. A noticeable incident of the day was that it was the thirtieth anniversary of the day when Captain Wilson lost his arm. This command served all through the war, and was in the memorable raid through Pennsylvania. The following officers were present and in command: Captain John A. Gibson, Lieutenant James Lindsay, Lieutenant Wm. M. Sterritt, Lieutenant Wm. N. Wilson, Orderly-Sergeat J. S. Gibson. The following is the roll of the survivors of Company H, as called by Orderly-Sergeant J. S. Gibson: Zzzprivates. J. W. Anderson, J. Y. Anderson, W. A. L. Anderson, D. S. Black, H. W. Bagley, Wm. Blackwell, Tom Chittum, John Chittum, Wm. Davis, L. P. Davis, David Dice, Geo. Dice, J. B. Fierbaugh, Robt. Fulwiler, Wm. Fox, J. H. Greiner, Columbus Greiner, Granville Greiner, James Glendy, C. P.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
rleans, Baton Rouge, and finally as Surgeon of the Port at Columbus, Miss. Lide, Wm. R., Assistant Surgeon. Passed Board at Shelbyville May 16, ‘63, ordered to report to E. A. F. May 17, ‘63, ordered to report to Colonel Gillespie, 25th Texas Cavalry, June 30, ‘63, Temple's Battery. Appointed by Secretary of War to rank May 16, ‘63, to report to Medical-Director. Lipford, Albert Thaddeus, Assistant Surgeon. Aug. 31, ‘63, 24th S. C. Regiment, April 30, ‘64, 47th Georgia Regiment. Lindsay, L., Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War May 30, ‘63, to rank Aug. 27, ‘62, report to Gen. Pemberton, Sept. 5, ‘63, ordered to report to Gen. Forrest, Sept. 30, ‘63, McDonald's Battalion Cavalry. Lightfoot, Robert A., contract $100, made by Col. Clay Sept, 30, ‘63. 1st Kentucky Cavalry. Logan, J. P., Surgeon. Dec. 31, ‘62, Surgeon in charge Atlanta, Ga. Lockhart, W. T., Assistant Surgeon. Passed Board July 15, ‘62. Dec. 31, ‘62, 34th Alabama Regiment, Feb.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
ice, John A. Gibson was made captain; James A. Strain, first lieutenant; James Archibald Lyle, second lieutenant, and James Lindsay, third lieutenant. The company was then doing service in Major William L. Jackson's battalion, composed of the folloA. Gibson was made Lieutenant-Colonel, and promotions were made in the Dragoons as follows: James A. Strain, Captain; James Lindsay, First Lieutenant; William M. Sterrett, Second Lieutenant; Z. J. Culton, Third Lieutenant, who died in Salem while thancy caused by his death. At the surrender the company was officered as follows: Captain, James A. Strain; First Lieutenant, James Lindsay; Second Lieutenant, William M. Sterret; Third Lieutenant, William N. Wilson. This company holds undisputevine, John Johnston, John M. Kirkpatrick, Joseph Kennedy, Hugh Kennedy, David Kennedy, Joseph Kinnear,W. B. F. Leech, James Lindsay, H. T. Lindsay, John Lowman, James A. Lyle, William A. Lyle, John H. Lyle, James Lockridge, Isaac Lotts, Jacob Ludwic