hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 8 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 6 0 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 2 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 1, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 65 results in 29 document sections:

1 2 3
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Kelleysville, March 17th, 1863-Reports of Generals J. E. B. Stuart and Fitz. Lee. (search)
eadful wound, using his sabre with effect in hand-to-hand conflict, and the imperturbable, self — possessed Major Breckenridge, of the Second, whose boldness led him so far that he was captured, his horse being shot. Colonel T. L. Munford of the Second, I regret to say, was President of a Court-Martial in Culpeper Courthouse, and did not know of the action in time to join his command until the fight was nearly over. I also commend for their behavior, Captain Tebbs, of the Second, and Captain Litchfield and Lieutenant Dorsey, of the First; also Major W. A. Morgan, of the First. My personal staff, Major Mason, Captains Ferguson and Bowling, Dr. J. B. Fontaine, and Lieutenants Lee, Ryals, and Minnegerode rendered great service by their accurate and quick transmission of orders, and by their conduct under fire. Surgeon Fontaine's horse was killed under him, and my own was also shot; but through the generosity of Private Jno. H. Owings, Company K, First Virginia cavalry, attached to
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
e miles from Louisville. I therefore pushed forward to Louisville, the leading division arriving there on the 25th, and the last on the 29th. The cavalry was kept as an outpost at Elizabethtown to guard the flank of the passing columns and watch any possible movements of the enemy toward Bowling Green. The large empty wagon train which the exhaustion of our supplies at Nashville had rendered useless and insupportable, had been pushed through from Bowling Green by the way of Brownsville, Litchfield, and West Point, under a cavalry escort. In his official report General Bragg states that he offered battle at Munfordville. No doubt he was willing to fight on his own terms at more than one point. But the general who offers battle is he who stays to give or receive it.--D. C. B. The army was now to encounter grave danger from the influence of Oliver P. Morton, Governor of Indiana. He had from the beginning tried to retain a quasi authority over Indiana troops after they had bee
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 36. battle of Port Royal, S. C. Fought November 7, 1861. (search)
ak two vessels were seen on our starboard bow, one of which proved to be the United States steamer, Isaac P. Smith, commanded by Lieutenant W. A. Nicholson, of the navy. She descried our signal of distress, which was ensign half-mast, union down, and stood for us. About ten o'clock we were hailed by the Smith, and given to understand that, if possible, we should all be taken on board. A boat was lowered from her, and we were enabled to take a hawser. This, through the carelessness of Capt. Litchfield of the Governor, was soon cast off or unavoidably let go. The water was still gaining on us, the engines could be worked but little, and it appeared that our only hope of safety was gone. The Smith now stood off, but soon returned, and by one o'clock we had another hawser from her, and were again in tow. A sail, (the propeller bark Young Rover,) which had been discovered on our starboard bow during the morning, was soon within hailing distance. The captain proffered all the assistance
ies's brigade, and immediately after charged the camp of the Seventh Michigan. The men, though taken entirely by surprise, seized their carbines, and under Colonel Litchfield, supported by the First Vermont, Colonel Preston, handsomely repulsed the enemy, who, owing to the camp-fires, had decidedly the advantage over our troops, rushing through the midnight air. The scene, all things considered, was not a very fascinating one to a man of tender nerves. Several men were wounded, and Colonel Litchfield, who is missing, it is feared is also wounded. The enemy had the exact range of General Davies's headquarters, but he remained at his post during the wholeom the nature of the expedition it was impossible to bring them in. The casualties have not yet been ascertained. Colonel Dahlgren, Major Cook, and Lieutenant-Colonel Litchfield, with about one hundred and fifty men, are missing. The latter is known to have been wounded. Too much praise cannot be awarded Colonel Dahlgren, n
dful wound, using his sabre with effect in hand-to-hand conflict, and the imperturbable, self-possessed Major Breckinridge, of the Second, whose boldness led him so far that he was captured, his horse being shot. Colonel T. L. Manford, of the Second, I regret to say, was president of a court martial in Culpeper Court-House, and did not know of the action in time to join his command until the fight was nearly over. I also recommend for their behavior, Captain Tebbs, of the Second, and Captain Litchfield and Lieutenant Dorsey, of the First; also Major W. D. Morgan, of the First. My personal staff, Major Mason, Captains Fergusson and Bowling, Dr. J. B. Fontaine, and Lieutenants Lee, Ryals, and Minnegerode, rendered great service by their accurate and a quick transmission of orders, and by their conduct under fire. Surgeon Fontaine's horse was killed under him, and my own horse was also shot; but, through the generosity of private John H. Owings, company K, First Virginia cavalry, at
agreed to send a committee to Washington, to induce Congress to shape the tariff of 1842 so as to protect them. The committee succeeded; and Mr. Stearns was one of them. The effect was the opposite of what they expected: it induced so many new men to begin the business that it ruined it. From 1835, the manufactory in Medford continued in operation to 1845, when it suspended activity. It resumed work for a year, when the building was burned in 1847. The factory of Messrs. Waterman and Litchfield, for the making of doors, blinds, window-sashes, &c., is a large and flourishing establishment, near the entrance of Medford Turnpike. It is operated by steam-power, and is extensively patronized by house-carpenters for planing boards. The mechanics and artisans of Medford, in their various departments, have excellent reputation, and much property. Brick-making. The large deposits of valuable clay within the town of Medford early directed the attention of the enterprising inhabita
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel W. C. Wickham's report of an engagement near Aldie, 17th of June, 1863. (search)
pushed rather too far forward on ground where it was impossible for cavalry to aid them. The enemy, finding themselves foiled in their attempt on this line, turned their attention to our left, where Colonel Munford, commanding the brigade, met them with the Second and Third regiments, reinforced by the Fourth, and later by the Fifth. For the rest of the evening I held my position with the First and Breathed's guns, driving back their skirmishers whenever they attempted to advance. Captain Litchfield's sharp-shooters were, as they always are, most efficient. Two much praise cannot be awarded to Captain Breathed and his brave men, who handled their guns with the utmost coolness, while their comrades were falling dead under the point-blank range of the enemy's carbines. This position I held until ordered to retire, bringing off all my killed and wounded. For the part borne by my own regiment, under the command of Captain Newton, who always acts well his part, I refer to his repo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clayton, John Middleton 1796-1856 (search)
Clayton, John Middleton 1796-1856 Jurist; born in Dagsboro, Sussex co., Del., July 24, 1796; graduated at Yale College in 1815, and at the famous Litchfield Law School; began practice in 1818; and, after serving in the State legislature, and as Secretary of State, was elected to the United States Senate in 1829 and 1835. In 1837 he resigned to become chief-justice of Delaware; from 1845 till 1849 was again in the United States Senate; in the latter year became Secretary of State under President Taylor; and from 1851 till his death was again in the United States Senate. It was during his service as Secretary of State that he negotiated with the British government what has since become known as the Clayton-Bulwer treaty (q. v.). He died in Dover, Del., Nov. 9, 1856.
mand. Several improvements made by him in the mechanism, and the later progress in machinery generally, have increased the annual production in that State to hundreds of thousands, and given to every household a clock, equal to the old ones, at a cost of $2 and upward. His descendants have been engaged in the business to the present time, and his pupil, Chauncey Jerome, since 1821. The Assembly of Connecticut, in October, 1783, awarded a patent for fourteen years to Benjamin Hanks, of Litchfield, for a self-winding clock. It was to wind itself by the help of the air, and to keep more regular time than other machines. The principle was made use of in New York and elsewhere. Several ingenious applications of natural pulsations have been made to effect the same purpose: Washburn's Thermal-motor, for instance, in which the expansion and contraction of bars of metal is made by differential levers and ratchets to wind the spring. Clocks with hands and dials having a common cente
renuous opposition of Zuinglius and some of the early reformers, the German churches were, during the sixteenth century, generally provided with organs. During this century, the German builders introduced the register and the stopped pipe. The key-board also was extended to four octaves. England, also, was well provided with artists of this class, and possessed some fine instruments. In 1634, we are informed that the organ in the cathedral of Durham cost pound1,000. Those of York, Litchfield, Hereford, Bristol, and other cathedral towns were also noted. During the civil war, the Puritans, particularly the parliamentary soldiers, destroyed many fine organs, breaking them in pieces and selling the pipes for old metal. Few or none being built during this period, the art became almost forgotten in England, so that Pepys records, under date of July 8, 1660: To White-Hall Chapel, where I got in with ease by going before the Lord Chancellor with Mr. Kipps. Here I heard very good
1 2 3