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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 1: old Cambridge (search)
niversity. Such were Charles Follen, Charles Beck, Pietro Bachi; and to these must be added (1816) that delightful and sunny representative of Southern France, that living Gil Bias in hair-powder and pigtail, Francis Sales. To these was later joined (1847) the attractive and inspiring Louis Agassiz. There were also in Cambridge several private libraries which were, for their period, remarkable; as that of Professor Convers Francis, rich in theology and in general literature; that of George Livermore, devoted especially to Bibles and Biblical literature; and that of Thomas Dowse, a leather-dresser in Cambridgeport, whose remarkable historical collections were bequeathed to the Massachusetts Historical Society. At a time when the Harvard Library held but forty thousand books, these collections had a relative importance which they would not now possess. They were enough to make Cambridge overbalance Boston, in its library opportunities, whereas for music and the plastic arts Cambrid
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Index (search)
James, Henry, Jr., 70. James, William, 70. Jennison, William, 23. Jewett, J. P., 65, 67, 68. Johnson, Dr., Samuel, 90. Johnson, Eastman, 170. Keats, John, 174. Kimball, J. W., 99. Kirk, J. F., 190. Kirkland, Pres. J. T., 116. Kneeland, Dr., 23. Kossuth, Louis, 46. Lachapelle, Madame, 96. Langdon, Pres., Samuel, 21. Lathrop, G. P., 70. Lechmere, Mrs., 151. Lechmere, Richard, 150. Lee, Judge, Joseph, 150, 152. Lee, Mrs., 151. Letcher, Gov., 178. Lindley, John, 100. Livermore, George, 18. Longfellow, H. W., II, 24, 32, 33, 36, 37,44, 65, 68, 69, 70, 86, 107; early life, III; comparison of Bowdoin and Harvard, 111-112; plans of life, 114-115; Bowdoin professorship, 116; first visit to Europe, I 6; European work, 117-118; early sketches, 118-119; marriage, 119-122; removal to Cambridge, 123; friendships, 124; Craigie House, 124-127; appearance, 128-129; second marriage, 130; Hiawatha, 131; Evangeline, 131; Psalm of life, 131-133; Hyperion, 134; diaries, 134-135; tro