hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 14 results in 6 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Livingston, Brockholst 1757- (search)
Livingston, Brockholst 1757- Jurist; born in New York City, Nov. 26, 1757; graduated at Princeton in 1774; served in the Revolutionary War until 1779, attaining the rank of lieutenant-colonel. In that year he was appointed private secretary to John Jay, who represented the United States in Europe. After the war he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1783, and in 1806 was appointed an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court. He served until his death, in Washington, D.rn in New York City, Nov. 26, 1757; graduated at Princeton in 1774; served in the Revolutionary War until 1779, attaining the rank of lieutenant-colonel. In that year he was appointed private secretary to John Jay, who represented the United States in Europe. After the war he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1783, and in 1806 was appointed an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court. He served until his death, in Washington, D. C., March 19, 1823. Livingston, Edward
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Supreme Court, United States (search)
land1789-90117451790 James Iredell, North Carolina1790-99917511799 Thomas Johnson, Maryland1791-93217321819 William Paterson, New Jersey1793-18061317451806 John Rutledge, South Carolina1795-95..17391800 Samuel Chase, Maryland1796-18111517411811 Oliver Ellsworth, Connecticut1796-1800417451807 Bushrod Washington, Virginia1798-18293117621829 Alfred Moore, North Carolina1799-1804517551810 John Marshall, Virginia1801-353417551835 William Johnson, South Carolina1804-343017711834 Brockholst Livingston, New York1806-231717571823 Thomas Todd, Kentucky1807-261917651826 Joseph Story, Massachusetts1811-453417791845 Gabriel Duval, Maryland1811-362517521844 Smith Thompson, New York1823-432017671843 Robert Trimble, Kentucky1826-28217771828 John McLean, Ohio1829-613217851861 Henry Baldwin, Pennsylvania1830-441417791844 James M. Wayne, Georgia1835-673217901867 Roger B. Taney, Maryland1836-642817771864 Philip B. Barbour, Virginia1836-41517831841 John Catron, Tennessee1837-65281786
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: Irving (search)
charge of being an English spy. He seems to have borne the troublesome interruptions with a full measure of equanimity, and he used each delay to good purpose as an opportunity for a more leisurely study of the environment and of the persons with whom he came into touch. He returned to New York early in 1806, shortly after Europe had been shaken by the battle of Austerlitz. Irving was admitted to the bar in November, 1806, having previously served as attorney's clerk, first with Brockholst Livingston and later with Josiah Ogden Hoffman. The law failed, however, to exercise for him any fascination, and his practice did not become important. He had the opportunity of being associated as a junior with the counsel who had charge of the defence of Aaron Burr in the famous trial held in Richmond in June, 1807. The writer remembers the twinkle in the old gentleman's eye when he said in reply to some question about his legal experiences, I was one of the counsel for Burr, and Burr wa
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
, 261 n. 271 Lincoln, 278 Linn, Elizabeth, 292 Linn, John Blair, 165, 177 Linnaeus, 186, 195 Linwoods, the, 310 Lionel Lincoln, 297, 300 Lists of New England Magazines, 120 n. Literary history of the American Revolution, 135 n. Literary magazine, the, 292 Literary world, the, 239 Little Beach Bird, the, 278 Littlepage manuscripts, 304-305 Little people of the snow, 273, 281 Lives (Plutarch), 93 Lives of distinguished American naval officers, 302 Livingston, Brockholst, 246 Livingston, William, 118, 119, 121, 162 Locke, 57, 58, 66, 70 n., 81, 93, 116, 1 8, 329, 334 Locke Amsden, 310 Lockhart, 305 Logan, 309 Logan, C. A., 228 Logan, James, 189 Loiterer, the, 234 London chronicle, the, 129, 140 London magazine, the, 121 Long, Major S. H., 205, 210 Longfellow, 166, 212, 244, 261, 262, 273, 355 Looking Glass for the times, a, 151 Love in 1876, 226 Lowell, James Russell, 241, 244, 249, 261, 268, 270, 276, 279, 282,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
urisprudence of my country. Your promise to furnish an article for the American Jurist has given me and my collaborateurs the greatest pleasure. We hope to receive it very soon. The subject of codification is deeply interesting to us at this moment. Commissioners in Massachusetts are now engaged in reducing to a code our criminal law. I think it will take them upwards of two years to accomplish this; and then the Legislature may reject their labors, as that of Louisiana did the code of Livingston. The Report of the Penal Code of Massachusetts was not made till 1844; it was then referred to the next legislature, and no further action taken. While the attention of the bar and the public is directed to this subject, an article from a person so competent and distinguished as you are would be read with the greatest interest. Let me ask you to persevere in your promise. My associates and myself will be glad to send in return some contribution to your very valuable journal, on such s
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 10: the voyage and Arrival.—December, 1837, to January, 1838— age, 26-27. (search)
he journal begins thus:— Dec. 25, 1837.—Christmas. It is now seventeen days since I left New York for Havre in the ship Albany, Captain Johnston. Described in a letter of Sumner to Judge Story, Dec. 25, as a man of science and veracity. My passage had been taken, and my bill on the Rothschilds in Paris obtained, on the 7th December. On that day dined with a pleasant party at Mrs. Ledyard's, Mrs. Susan Ledyard, 53 Crosby Street; a friend of Judge Story, and the daughter of Brockholst Livingston, a judge of the Supreme Court of the United States, 1806-23. She died March 7, 1864; surviving her husband, Benjamin Ledyard, more than half a century.— the last dinner of my native land. Left early, called on one or two friends, and spent the residue of the hours before retiring—running far into the watches of the night—in writing letters; saying some parting words to the friends whom I value. And a sad time it was, full of anxious thoughts and doubts, with mingled gleams of g