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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 2 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Stone's River, Tenn. (search)
: k, 78; w, 239; m, 240 = 557. Third (late Twenty-third) Brigade, Col. Samuel W. Price: 35th Ind., Col. Bernard F. Mullen; 8th Ky., Lieut.-Col. Reuben May, Maj. Green B. Broaddus; 21st Ky., Lieut.-Co l. James C. Evans; 51st Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Richard W. McClain; 99th Ohio, Col. Peter T. Swaine (w), Lieut.-Col. John E. Cummins. Brigade loss: k, 79; w, 361; m, 143 = 583. Artillery, Capt. George R. Swallow: 7th Ind., Capt. George R. Swallow; B, Pa., Lieut. Alanson J. Stevens; 3d Wis., Lieut. Cortland Livingston. Artillery loss: k, 6; w, 19 = 25. cavalry, Brig.-Gen. David S. Stanley. cavalry division, Col. John Kennett. First Brigade, Col. Robert H. G. Minty: M, 2d Ind., Capt. J. A. S. Mitchell; 3d Ky., Col. Eli H. Murray; 4th Mich., Lieut.-Col. William H. Dickinson; 7th Pa., Maj. John E. Wynkoop. Brigade loss: k, 5; w, 24; m, 77 = 106. Second Brigade, Col. Lewis Zahm: 1st Ohio, Col. Minor Milliken (k), Maj. James Laughlin; 3d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Douglas A. Murray; 4th Ohio, Maj. Jo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The battle of Stone's River. (search)
f Breckinridge's division was crowned by Cobb's battery of artillery. On the left and rear, Grose's brigade of Palmer's division occupied a knoll in support of Livingston's battery on the following day. The Confederate line, formed by Polk and Breckinridge on the right and Hardee on the left, extended from the point on Stone'sver bank and the ridge occupied by Grose now presented a scene of the wildest confusion. The pursuit led the Confederate column to the right of Grose, and Lieutenant Livingston opened upon it with his artillery, but he was quickly ordered across the river. Crittenden, turning to his chief-of-artillery, said, Mendenhall, you must with your guns. Never was there a more effective response to such a request; the batteries of Swallow, Parsons, Estep, Stokes, Stevens, Standart, Bradley, and Livingston dashed forward, wheeled into position, and opened fire. In all, fifty-eight pieces of artillery played upon the enemy. Not less than one hundred shots per min
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Chickamauga, Ga. September 19th-20th; 1863. (search)
Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Granville A. Frambes. Brigade loss: k, 16; w, 180; m, 83 == 279. Third Brigade, Col. Sidney M. Barnes: 35th Ind., Maj. John P. Dufficy; 8th Ky., Lieut.-Col. James D. Mayhew (c), Maj. John S. Clark; 51st Ohio, Col. Richard W. McClain (c), Lieut.-Col. Charles H. Wood; 99th Ohio, Col. Peter T. Swaine. Brigade loss: k, 20; w, 135; m, 144 == 299. Artillery: 17th Ind., Capt. George R. Swallow; 26th Pa., Capt. Alanson J. Stevens (k), Lieut. Samuel M. McDowell; 3d Wis., Lieut. Cortland Livingston. Artillery loss: k, 4; w, 35; m, 13 == 52. Reserve Corps, Maj.-Gen. Gordon Granger. Staff loss: k, 1. First division, Brig.-Gen. James B. Steedman. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Walter C. Whitaker: 96th Ill., Col. Thomas E. Champion; 115th Ill., Col. Jesse H. Moore; 84th Ind., Col. Nelson Trusler; 22d Mich., Col. Heber Le Favour (c), Lieut.-Col. William Sanborn (w), Capt. Alonzo M. Keeler (e); 40th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. William Jones; 89th Ohio, Col. Caleb H, Carlton (c), Capt. Isa
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—eastern Tennessee. (search)
eaving, on the 16th of August, Camp Nelson near Lexington, into four columns of infantry and one of cavalry, which, collecting some reinforcements on the way, formed in line on the 21st, to the north of the Cumberland Valley, on the different routes which each was appointed to take. To the first column on the right, which had the longest way to go, was assigned the best and surest route: it was entrusted with the heaviest part of the train. Leaving Glasgow, it made, via Tompkinsville and Livingston, for the village of Jamestown, where it was merged, on the 28th of August, with the second column, which had come from Columbia via Creelsborough and Albany. The two others, much more numerous than the preceding, united at Chitwood's on the 26th, the one having started from Somerset under the orders of Hartsuff, and the other, under the immediate direction of Burnside, having followed, after leaving Crab Orchard, the route that was the most difficult and exposed to attacks from the enemy
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Addenda by the Editor. (search)
1st OhioCol. Richard W. McClain. 99th OhioCol. Peter T. Swaine. Artillery. Capt. Lucius H. Drury. 7th Indiana BatteryCapt. George R. Swallow. Independent Pennsylvania, Battery BCapt. Alanson J. Stevens. 3d Wisconsin BatteryLieut. Cortland Livingston. Reserve corps. Maj.-gen. Gordon Granger. General headquarters. 1st Missouri Cavalry, Company FCapt. James Clifford. Signal CorpsLieut. Washington W. Hopkins. First division. Brig.-gen. Absalom Baird. First harles H. Wood. 99th OhioCol. Peter T. Swaine. Artillery. Indiana Light, 7th BatteryCapt. George R. Swallow. Pennsylvania Light, 26th BatteryCapt. Alanson J. Stevens. Lieut. Samuel M. McDowell. Wisconsin Light, 3d BatteryLieut. Cortland Livingston. Reserve corps. Maj.-gen. Gordon Granger. First division. Brig.-gen. James B. Steedman. First Brigade. Brig.-gen. Walter C. Whitaker. 96th IllinoisCol. Thomas E. Champion. 115th IllinoisCol. Jesse H. Moore. 84th