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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anti-rent party. (search)
y aid, the so-called Helderberg War, was unsuccessful. In 1847 and 1849 the anti-renters showed a voting strength of 5,000, adopting a part of each party tickets. In 1850 the legislature directed the attorney-general to bring suit against Harmon Livingston to try title. The suit was decided in Livingston's favor, November, 1850, but a compromise was effected, the owners selling the farms at fair rates, and the tenants paying for them. Most of Rensselaerswyck was sold, and of Livingston Manodopting a part of each party tickets. In 1850 the legislature directed the attorney-general to bring suit against Harmon Livingston to try title. The suit was decided in Livingston's favor, November, 1850, but a compromise was effected, the owners selling the farms at fair rates, and the tenants paying for them. Most of Rensselaerswyck was sold, and of Livingston Manor, which at one time contained 162,000 acres of choice farms, only a small portion now remains in the possession of the family.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Armstrong, John, 1758-1843 (search)
ia; and in 1784 he conducted operations against the settlers in the Wyoming Valley. The Continental Congress in 1787 appointed him one of the judges for the Northwestern Territory, but he declined. Two years later he married a sister of Chancellor Livingston, removed to New York, purchased a farm within the precincts of the old Livingston Manor on the Hudson, and devoted himself to agriculture. He was a member of the national Senate from 1800 to 1804, and became United States minister at the French Court in the latter year, succeeding his brother-in-law, Chancellor Livingston. He was commissioned a brigadier-general in July, 1812, and in January, 1813, became Secretary of War in the cabinet of President Madison. His lack of success in the operations against Canada, and at the attack upon and capture of Washington in 1814, made him so unpopular that he resigned and retired to private life. He died at Red Hook. N. Y., April 1, 1843. General Armstrong wrote Notes on the War of 18
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bankruptcy laws, past and present. (search)
assist to a better understanding of the law of 1898, if we note these landmarks. 1. Who may become a bankrupt? 2. What are acts of bankruptcy? 3. What is a preference? 4. When may a discharge be refused? 5. What is the procedure which will prove least expensive and most expeditious? This classification includes two elements born since Blackstone's time. Who May become a bankrupt? The limitation to traders has already been mentioned. Indeed, so late as 1817, in this country, Judge Livingston doubted whether an act of Congress subjecting to such a law every description of persons within the United States would be constitutional. Yet our law of 1841 extended the meaning of the term trader so that, in involuntary bankruptcies, it included bankers, brokers, factors, underwriters and marine insurers. All classes of persons could become bankrupts in England after 1861; and the like broad rule received expression in our law of 1867, with the single exception that, when the act o
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bemis's Heights, battles of. (search)
by words and acts, animated the Americans. For three hours the battle raged. Like an ocean tide the warriors surged backward and forward, winning and losing victory alternately. When it was too late, Gates sent out the New York regiments of Livingston and Van Cortlandt and the whole brigade of General Learned. Had Gates complied with Arnold's wishes, the capture of Burgoyne's army might have been easily accomplished. Night closed the contest, and both parties slept on their arms until morn With the troops first of Generals Paterson and Glover, and then of Learned, he assailed the enemy's right, which was defended by Canadians and loyalists. The English gave way, leaving the Germans exposed. Then Arnold ordered up the troops of Livingston and Wesson, with Morgan's riflemen, to make a general assault, while Colonel Brooks, with his Massachusetts regiment, accompanied by Arnold, attacked the troops commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Breyman. Arnold rushed into the sally-port on his