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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 100 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 14 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Robert R. Livingston or search for Robert R. Livingston in all documents.

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y; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety. See also the Mecklenburg Declaration. The original draft of the Declaration of American Independence was first communicated by Mr. Jefferson separately to two of his colleagues, John Adams and Benjamin Franklin, on the committee chosen by Congress to prepare it; then to the whole committee, consisting, in addition, of Roger Sherman and Robert R. Livingston; reported, after twenty days gestation, on the 28th of June; read in Committee of the Whole on the 1st of July; earnestly debated and scanned throughout the three following days, until finally adopted on the evening of the 4th. It may safely be said that not an affirmation, not a sentiment, was put forth therein to the world, which had not received the deliberate approbation of such cautious, conservative minds as those of Franklin, John Adams, and Roger Sherman, and of the American
ned to overthrow the Federalists here and bring the Republicans into power. But all this was now morally certain to be reversed. France, planting herself, as it were, at our back door, there erecting fortifications, and jealously scrutinizing, if not positively arresting, every one who should undertake to pass in or out, became inevitably and predominantly the object of American distrust and hostility. Upon learning of this important transfer, Mr. Jefferson (April 18, 1802) wrote to Mr. Livingston, our Minister at Paris, as follows: The cession of Louisiana and the Floridas by Spain to France, works most sorely on the United States. On this subject, the Secretary of State has written to you fully, yet I cannot forbear recurring to it personally, so deep is the impression it makes on my mind. It completely reverses all the political relations of the United States, and will form a new epoch in our political course. Of all nations of any consideration, France is the one which
from Notes on Virginia, 21; 33; extract from the original Declaration of Independence; his reasons for the omission of a certain passage, etc., 34; 35; presents Virginia's deed of cession, 38; his Ordinance of 1784, 39; 42; 53; instructions to Livingston, 55; his diplomacy with France and purchase of Louisiana, 55-6; recommends the Cotton-Gin. 63; takes the Southern view of the Missouri question, 75; letter from Adams on the question, 81; becomes the leader of the Republicans, or Anti-Federali528; 551; his Message at the Extra Session, 555 to 559; Gen. Fremont's letter to, 583-4; Davis writes to, with regard to the privateersmen, 599 ; Magoffin's letter, and the President's reply, 610-11; directs the formation of army corps, 619. Livingston, Edward, 95. Locke, John, on the Slave-Trade, 28. Loguen, Jerry, a fugitive slave, 215. London Times, The, Russell's estimate of our forces prior to Bull Run, 550. Lone Star, order of the, 270; 350. Longstreet, Gen. Jas., at Bla