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Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 1: the father of the man. (search)
hose anxious years of struggle and want. Even Lloyd, wee bit of a boy, was pressed into the servic of a certain mansion on State street. It was Lloyd who went for this food, and it was he who had s children have said in the story of his life: Lloyd was a thorough boy, fond of games and of all bworld to better theirs and her own condition. Lloyd went to live in Deacon Ezekiel Bartlett's famir and gone to sea. Lloyd, poor little homesick Lloyd, was the only consolation left the broken hearld masters, poverty and experience. By and by Lloyd was a second time apprenticed to learn a tradehis mother about this time, the boy is full of Lloyd, undisguisedly proud of Lloyd, believes in LloLloyd, believes in Lloyd. When I peruse them over (i. e. those fifteen communications to the press), I feel absolutely Lloyd. When I peruse them over (i. e. those fifteen communications to the press), I feel absolutely astonished, he naively confesses, at the different subjects which I have discussed, and the style i you and me, reader, to look into. Soon after Lloyd's return to Newburyport a cancerous tumor deve[11 more...]
1.366. Baptists, Palmers of that denomination, 1.11: Fanny Lloyd's conversion, 15; First Church in Newburyport, 24; Gen. infant, 5, characteristics, 12, 13, mariner, 12; marries Fanny Lloyd, 13-15, home in St. John, 16, children, 16, 20, 24; remoLloyd, 1.40; from her mother, 1.39. Garrison, Fanny. See Lloyd, Frances Maria. Garrison, George Thompson [b. 1836], 2.94], meets G., 2.377, 384; memoir of G., 1.13; account of Fanny Lloyd, 14, 15. Howitt, William [1795-1879], on Mrs. Mott'selection urged by G., 85; declines to receive Lib., 325. Lloyd, Frances Maria (Fanny) [b. Deer Island, N. B., 1776; d. Bal establishes a women's prayer-meeting, 32; moral counsel to Lloyd, 33, 37, 38, 49, 51, supplies him with clothes, 40, comment.—Letters to husband's parents, 1.19. M. Farnham, 1.32, son Lloyd, 1.33, 37, 38, 44, 48, 51, son James, 1.35, daughter Elizabeth, 1.39, E. W. Allen, 1.50; from her husband, 1.16, 23, Lloyd, 1.49, Mrs. T. Pickering, 1.38. Lloyd, William, namesake
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry.—1764-1805. (search)
r St. John, N. B., where his daughter Mary marries Joseph Garrison. Their son Abijah marries Fanny Lloyd of Deer Island, N. B. From Nova Scotia this couple remove in 1805 to Newburyport, Mass., wherirst person buried on Deer Island; and on this unfertile but picturesque and fascinating spot Fanny Lloyd was born in 1776, and became the belle of the family. She was of a tall, majestic figure. would preach in a barn, and a party of gay young people, one of whom was the lovely and gay Fanny Lloyd, agreed for a frolic to go and hear him. Of those who went to scoff one remained to pray; this was Fanny Lloyd. Her soul was deeply touched by the meek and holy spirit of the preacher; she wept much during the sermon, and when it was over, the preacher spake kindly to her. From that day a cd kindred, his pleasant and even his grim humor; on the other, the deeply emotional nature of Fanny Lloyd, thrilling not only with the thought of separation from past benefactors, but also with the n
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 2: Boyhood.—1805-1818. (search)
Chapter 2: Boyhood.—1805-1818. Lloyd shares the poverty and hardship to which his father's p together as members of one family. Before Lloyd was three years old, his parents lost their sers old, and the youngest a babe in arms; while Lloyd, who was to become in later years her main comdoor, to win a subsistence for his family; and Lloyd, who was an exemplary and conscientious boy, aked up the fugitives and brought them back. Lloyd was a thorough boy, fond of games and of all bmes being again apprenticed at shoemaking, and Lloyd making himself useful as best he could in doin away from his master and took to the sea, and Lloyd became so homesick for Newburyport that his mo I do hope he will always be so steady. So Lloyd was sent back to Newburyport, and again made h about this time, she said,—I am trying to get Lloyd a place as Ms. house C[arpenter?], as he dod, wishing a boy to learn the printer's trade, Lloyd was presented as a candidate for the place and[14 more...]<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 3: Apprenticeship.—1818-1825. (search)
The allusion to the Balsam of Quito which Lloyd had recommended to her betrays, even at that eeluctant to leave her Newburyport friends than Lloyd had been. She made the voyage to Baltimore wi and not trouble myself about the ladies. Lloyd was at work at the case when his master receivall the sensations of mortified pride,—telling Lloyd how his kind attention to her and his good beh 1822. gone to Mobile for the winter, leaving Lloyd in charge of the office, while Mr. Cushing att abroad. Circumstances now arose to prevent Lloyd's writing further for the press for a consider in 1844. He was only a few months older than Lloyd, and they spent many evenings together in a roapp, who, like Crocker, was warmly attached to Lloyd and greatly influenced by his strong magnetism Mr. Charles J. Brockway, who was two years Lloyd's junior, and recalls him as a handsome and anuring and of the highest importance. Though Lloyd was not, like Crocker, a communicant in the ch[18 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 5: Bennington and the Journal of the Times1828-29. (search)
Lest unworthy motives should be attributed to us, said the writer, we think proper to declare beforehand our high admiration of his talents, and entire confidence in his integrity and patriotism. And then followed this bit of description: My Lloyd is a young man, and an immigrant from the Vt. Gazette, Mar. 31, 1829. Bay State. A pair of silver-mounted spectacles ride elegantly across his nose, and his figure and appearance are not unlike that of a dandy. He is, withal, a great egotist, and, when talking of himself, displays the pert loquacity of a blue-jay. . . . In regard to the affairs of the world, My Lloyd labors under a strange delusion, insomuch that he has taken upon himself to abolish slavery in the District of Columbia, reform the judiciary and militia of the State, and last, though not least, to impart the graces of a Boston dandy to the unpolished natives of our happy State. These parting gibes elicited no more attention from their subject than had others whi
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 17: the disunion Convention.—1857. (search)
just-quoted letter to Mr. May, he wrote: After a wasting sickness of nine months duration (more than six of which were passed under my roof), my aunt Charlotte saw the last of earth on the 2d inst. I rejoice that I was able to give her every attention, and to do all in my power to relieve and save her; but her illness has thrown upon me a heavy pecuniary load,—some hundreds of dollars additional. Charlotte E. Newell; Lib. 27.163. Mrs. Newell was the youngest and much loved sister of Fanny Lloyd. On her losing her employment in 1854, Mr. Garrison wrote to his widowed relative, offering her a Ms. Apr. 7, 1854. home for the remainder of her days. While I have a place to shelter my own head, he said, or a crust of bread to eat, you shall share it with me. On the very eve of her dissolution, a curious discovery was made, after more than thirty years, of a few hundred dollars belonging to Mr. Garrison's mother in a Baltimore savings-bank. This sum, by the friendly intervention of