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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Lockett or search for Lockett in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
Black river; the sluggish river; the blazing timber; the smoke of battle. General Pemberton, with head hung down and despair written over the lineaments of his face, gave utterance to the honest sentiment of his heart when he remarked to Colonel Lockett, the Chief Engineer of the army, that thirty years ago, to-day, I commenced my career as a soldier, and to-day ends it. What a confession of failure these pathetic words conveyed to his listeners. In a house at Oxford, Miss., the nightas nothing to do but seek consolation on the hard couch of a soldier or bewail the half-way manner of doing things customary in the Western Army of the Confederate States. About the gray of day next morning I received a rude shaking up from Colonel Lockett—my chief in the engineer department-that dispelled the sweet repose induced by a complete non-responsibility. Do you know that the gunboats are attacking Snyder's Bluff! No. Report at once to your headquarters; your place is there. All r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
Black river; the sluggish river; the blazing timber; the smoke of battle. General Pemberton, with head hung down and despair written over the lineaments of his face, gave utterance to the honest sentiment of his heart when he remarked to Colonel Lockett, the Chief Engineer of the army, that thirty years ago, to-day, I commenced my career as a soldier, and to-day ends it. What a confession of failure these pathetic words conveyed to his listeners. In a house at Oxford, Miss., the nightas nothing to do but seek consolation on the hard couch of a soldier or bewail the half-way manner of doing things customary in the Western Army of the Confederate States. About the gray of day next morning I received a rude shaking up from Colonel Lockett—my chief in the engineer department-that dispelled the sweet repose induced by a complete non-responsibility. Do you know that the gunboats are attacking Snyder's Bluff! No. Report at once to your headquarters; your place is there. All r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 77 (search)
pon Vicksburg the vanity of a Major of artillery, who because of seniority was the chief of artillery on the line, caused me a narrow escape from the sudden death that the church reminds us every Sunday to pray against. He had sent a dispatch to Major-General Smith that the enemy was making a breach in the works, and asking that the engineer officer report to the works at once. It was sent to me by General Smith, with a request to go. As I had been on duty sixteen hours I refused, but Colonel Lockett persuaded me to go. Just above the courthouse on the river road I was shot in the thigh, but fortunately having the means at hand, and the minnie ball having touched no bone or artery, I had the wound dressed and rode on, reporting to Brigadier-General Vaughn at Fort Hill. There was nothing the matter with the works, so having plenty of time both General Vaughn and I expended an incalculable number of hard words on that soft artillery officer. He got the rheumatism, dug him a cave, an