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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 33 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 30 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for John G. Lockhart or search for John G. Lockhart in all documents.

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 1: (search)
y. His purpose in using cedar is to keep out the worms and all other vermin. He talked to me a great deal about Captain Basil Hall, with whom he has a grievous quarrel This quarrel arose from the conduct of Captain Hall, during a visit to the Baroness Purgstall, an aged relative of Von Hammer,—by marriage,—who lived in Styria; and his account of her domestic life in a book entitled Schloss Hainfeld, or a Winter in Styria. The Baroness Purgstall was a native of Scotland, and appears in Lockhart's Life of Scott, under her maiden name, as Miss Cranstoun. Von Hammer, who inherited a portion of her estate, and added the name of Purgstall to his own, published an answer to Captain Hall's work. . . . . I visited, too, Kaltenbaeck, the editor of the Austrian periodical for History and Statistics. He was immersed in papers and books, and complained bitterly of the trouble given him by the merely mechanical restraints imposed by the censorship, which take up, it seems, a great deal of
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
er 8: London. Henry Nelson Coleridge. Hallam. Elizabeth Barrett. Lockhart. Jeffrey. Sir Edmund Head. story of Canning. story of the Duke of Sussex. I went to afterwards was John Murray's, —the publishers,—where I fell in with Lockhart, with whom I have exchanged cards this week, but whom I had not seen. He is tt was not worth a button; but I did it in a sort of tone of defiance, to which Lockhart's manners irresistibly impelled me, and which I dare say was as judicious with. . . She talked of Scott with a tender enthusiasm that was contagious, and of Lockhart with a kindness that is uncommon when coupled with his name, and which seemed it. The party to-day consisted of Empson; Richardson, so much mentioned by Lockhart as Scott's friend; Mackenzie, son of the Man, of Feeling, long Secretary-Gener Of course, it was very agreeable. We talked about Scotland and Scott; about Lockhart, with whom Murchison is very intimate; about India, Rome, Bunsen, and the Arch
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
approached it nineteen years ago, than was the place itself. We had been reading on our journey the last sad volume of Lockhart's Life, with the account of Scott's pecuniary troubles, and their tragical result. The first glimpse of Abbotsford madelen had also written to Mr. Napier on the subject. Don P. de Gayangos wrote the review. . . . . I asked Napier about Lockhart's Scott. He says he cannot review it, partly because Lockhart is editor of the Quarterly, and partly because of the conLockhart is editor of the Quarterly, and partly because of the connections of the work on all sides in Edinburgh; but that it is full of prejudices and errors; that many persons in Scotland are much offended by it, the children and friends of the Ballantynes most justly so, etc.: much of which is no doubt true, andntance I had with him formerly at Rome, and invited me to his place in Staffordshire. It was all quite agreeable. Even Lockhart was softened by the society, and introduced the subject of Ferdinand and Isabella, which he would not have done if he ha
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
le. . . . . . . . . Among the books republished here, and of which more copies have been sold in America than were sold of the original edition in England, is Lockhart's Life of Sir Walter, about which you ask. It is a most interesting book, and has greatly interested the multitudes here, who feel that Scott belongs to us as here, therefore, pained by some parts of this book . . . . To the admirers of Sir Walter in America, who knew him only as they know Shakespeare, part of what is in Lockhart was an unwelcome surprise, much more so than it was in England, where the weaknesses of his character were known to many. Sir Walter, therefore, does not stand, in the moral estimation of this country, where he did. Perhaps Lockhart could not avoid this, certainly he could not avoid it entirely, but there is one thing he could have avoided; I mean printing some of the letters, and some parts of the private journal. No doubt the letters, generally, are the most delightful part of the
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 18: (search)
rt, and the rest of us to Mrs. Horner's. The dinner was pleasant, a little learned, a little gay, and altogether sensible. . . . . The party at Mrs. Homer's was just like the one you and I went to there last year. We had Gibson and Lady Bell, Edward Bunbury, Colonel Lyell, and perhaps a dozen more. . . . . Lady Bell and Mrs. Horner sent you abundance of affectionate messages. I talked a good deal with Richardson, Scott's old friend, who appears so largely and pleasantly in the Life by Lockhart. . . . . Telling him how fine I thought Scott's colloquial powers, he answered, Yes, but they were never so fine as when he was having a jolly good time with two or three friends. He then described to me what he considered the finest specimen he had ever had of them. It was when nobody was present but Tom Campbell. They dined together at Ton's, in Sydenham, near London,—a very modest little cottage, where I dined in 1815,—and where the scene of this talk was chiefly laid at just about th
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
123, 350, 851, 380, 381, 382, II. 118, 488. Livingston, Judge, I. 39. Livingston, Mr. and Mrs. Maturin, I. 886. Livingston, Mrs., Edward, I. 350, 351, 381, 382, II. 488. Llangollen, visits, I. 51, 52. Lloyd, Professor, I. 405. Lockhart, John G., II. 147, 179, 189. Lockhart, Mrs. J. G., I. 407. Lohrmann, W. G., I. 459, 482. London, Tower of, I 446, 447. London, visits, I. 51, 54-68, 251, 263-267, 289-298, 406-418. 445-449, II. 144-155, 175-183, 311, 812, 321-327, 357-376, 3Lockhart, Mrs. J. G., I. 407. Lohrmann, W. G., I. 459, 482. London, Tower of, I 446, 447. London, visits, I. 51, 54-68, 251, 263-267, 289-298, 406-418. 445-449, II. 144-155, 175-183, 311, 812, 321-327, 357-376, 378-387. Long, Professor, George, I. 348. Longfellow, Henry W., I. 399, II. 196, 204, 479. Longfellow, Stephen, I. 14. Loretto, visits, I. 167. Lough, John Graham, II. 152. Louis Philippe, King of the French, II. 16, 19, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 121, 122, 135. Louvois, Marchioness de, I. 253. Lovell, Mrs., I. 286, II. 166. Lovering, Professor J., II. 310. Lowe, Rev Mr., I. 440, 441, 445. Lowe, Right Hon Robert, II. 380. Lowell, John, I. 389, 356, 360 Lowenstein—Werthe