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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 28 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 2, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 5 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 5, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Lockwood or search for Lockwood in all documents.

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's, he fought right smart along the front of the Second corps. Colonel Carroll's brigade, composed of Western troops, conducted themselves in a manner that cannot be too highly praised. Colonel Carroll evinced considerable skill by drawing the enemy to his line of battle down she turnpike, where large numbers of Gordon's brigade, belonging to Early's division, were captured Colonel Carroll had a miraculous escape from instant death, his clothing having ten or twelve bullet-holes in it. Colonel Lockwood, of the same brigade, had his uniform pierced in several places by Minie balls. In the afternoon, General Meade ascertained that General French had participated in an engagement, and the enemy had massed a force strong enough to successfully resist him. The exact position of the Third corps, at this time, still continued an uncertainty, although it was known to be four or five miles distant. At sundown General Warren ventured to advance his line of skirmishers, with a strong support.
It was now pretty clear that General Meade had awakened to the fact which he treated with such indifference when pressed on him by Sickles in the morning — that our left was the assailable point, if not the key to our position; for he began to pour in reenforcements whose presence in the beginning of the action would have saved thousands of lives. Perceiving great exertions on the part of the enemy, says Meade's report, the Sixth corps (Sedgwick's) and part of the First corps, (Newton's,) Lockwood's Maryland brigade, together with detachments from the Second corps, were all brought up at different periods, and succeeded, together with the gallant resistance of the Fifth corps, in checking and finally repulsing the assault of the enemy, who retired in confusion and disorder about sunset, and ceased any further efforts. If this remarkable concentration of troops was necessary, at last, to save the left of our army, it is almost incredible that the single corps of General Sickles was a