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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 17 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Danish West Indies, (search)
4 miles wide. Its surface is rugged and elevated, reaching its greatest height towards the centre. The soil is sandy, and mostly uncultivated. Charlotte Amalie, which is the principal town and the seat of government for the Danish West Indies, has an excellent harbor and large trade. The population of the island is about 14,000. St. John has an area of 42 square miles. The chief exports are cattle and bay-rum, and the population is about 1,000. Negotiations with Denmark for the cession of the islands to the United States began in 1898, after the close of the war with Spain; but owing to political changes in the Danish government, no definite results were then attained. In December, 1900, Congress became favorable to the bill of Senator Lodge, advising the purchase of the islands, and negotiations to that end were reopened. On Dec. 29, 1900, the United States minister to Denmark officially informed that government that the United States would pay $3,240,000 for the islands.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Elections, federal control of. (search)
Elections, federal control of. When the question of the federal control of elections was under discussion, the Hon. Henry Cabot Lodge, U. S. Senator from Massachusetts, wrote: No form of government can be based on systematic injustice; least of all a republic. All governments partake of the imperfections of human nature, and fall far short not only of the ideals dreamed of by good men, but even of the intentions of ordinary men. Nevertheless, if perfection be unattainable, it is still the duty of every nation to live up to the principles of simple justice, and at least follow the lights it can clearly see. Whatever may have been the intentions of our forefathers, the steady growth of our government has been towards a democracy of manhood. One by one the barriers which kept from the suffrage the poor and the unlearned have been swept away, and, in the long run, no majority has been great enough, no interest has known a refluent wave. What democracy been strong enough, t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lodge, Henry Cabot 1850- (search)
Lodge, Henry Cabot 1850- Legislator and author; born in Boston, May 12, 1850; graduated at Harvard University in 1871, and at the Harvard Law School in 1875; was admitted to the Suffolk bar in 1876; edited North American review in 1873-76, and tctive support. Besides the following speeches, see election bill, federal. Restriction of immigration. In 1896 Senator Lodge introduced into the Senate a bill to restrict the flood of immigration, the most striking feature of which was the pr of the number of the slip which the said immigrant failed to read or copy out in writing. In support of his bill, Senator Lodge made an argument, of which the subjoined is the substance: There can be no doubt that there is a very earnest desiop, at least to check, to sift, and to restrict those immigrants. Problem of the Philippines. On March 7, 1900, Senator Lodge delivered a speech in the Senate on the new relations of the United States in the East, substantially as follows:
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McKinley, William 1843- (search)
vention, is one of the most important papers in the political history of the country. It not only considers with much detail and clearness the engrossing interests of a most eventful epoch, but it discloses without reserve the policy and intentions of President McKinley's administration. (The italicized headings to the various subdivisions of this letter are not in the original, but have been added to make reference easy.) executive mansion, Washington, D. C., Sept. 8, 1900. The Hon. Henry Cabot Lodge, Chairman Notification Committee: My dear Sir,—The nomination of the Republican National Convention of June 19, 1900, for the office of the President of the United States, which, as the official representative of the convention, you have conveyed to me, is accepted. I have carefully examined the platform adopted and give to it my hearty approval. Upon the great issue of the last national election it is clear. It upholds the gold standard, and indorses the legislation of the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Philippine Islands, (search)
sions: 1. The United States cannot withdraw from the Philippine Islands. We are there and duty binds us to remain. There is no escape from our responsibility to the Filipinos and to mankind for the government of the archipelago and the amelioration of the condition of the inhabitants. 2. The Filipinos are wholly unprepared for independence, and if independence were given to them they could not maintain it. 3. Under the third head is included a copy of Admiral Dewey's letter to Senator Lodge, which was read in the Senate the other day, denying Aguinaldo's claim that he was promised independence. 4. There being no Philippine nation, but only a collection of different peoples, there is no general public opinion in the archipelago; but the men of property and education, who alone interest themselves in public affairs, in general recognize as indispensable American authority, guidance, and protection. 5. Congress should, at the earliest practicable time, provide for the Ph
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Santiago, naval battle of (search)
Santiago, naval battle of See also Sampson, William Thomas; Schley, Winfield Scott; Spain, War with. United States Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, in a narrative of the American-Spanish War, gives the following graphic history of the great naval engagement off the entrance to the harbor of Santiago de Cuba on July 3, 1898: It matters little now why Cervera pushed open the door of Santiago Harbor and rushed out to ruin and defeat. The admiral himself would have the world understand that he was forced out by illadvised orders from Havana and Madrid. Very likely this is true. It did not occur to the Spaniards that the entire American army had been flung upon El Caney and San Juan, and that there were no reserves. Their own reports, moreover, from the coast were wild and exaggerated, so that, deceived by these as well as by the daring movements and confident attitude of the American army, they concluded that the city was menaced by not less than 50,000 men. Under these condit
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State sovereignty. (search)
was often asserted and rarely, if ever, denied anterior to 1861. It cannot be said that it was then for the first time formally asserted and therefore for the first time denied. The acquisition of Louisiana in 1803 created much dissatisfaction in the New England States, the reason of which was expressed by an eminent citizen of Massachusetts, who said that the influence of our part of the Union must be diminished by the acquisition of more weight at the other extremity. (Life of Cabot, by Lodge, p. 334.) In 1811, on the bill for the admission of Louisiana as a State of the Union, the Hon. Josiah Quincy, member of Congress from Massachusetts, said: If this bill passes, it is my deliberate opinion that it is virtually a dissolution of this Union; that it will free the States from their moral obligation; and as it will be the right of all, so it will be the duty of some, definitely to prepare for a separation— amicably if they can, violently if they must. The Hartford Convention
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 13 (search)
ities and even accents. I remember that once, when I was speaking on the same platform with an able young Irish lawyer, he was making an attack on the present Senator Lodge, and said contemptuously, Mr. Henry Cabot Lodge of Nahant --and he paused for a response which did not adequately follow. Then he repeated more emphatically, Mr. Henry Cabot Lodge of Nahant --and he paused for a response which did not adequately follow. Then he repeated more emphatically, Of Nahant! He calls it in that way, but common people say Nahant! Then the audience took the point, and, being largely Irish, responded enthusiastically. Now, Mr. Lodge had only pronounced the name of his place of residence as he had done from the cradle, as his parents had said it before him, and as all good Bostonians had habiMr. Lodge had only pronounced the name of his place of residence as he had done from the cradle, as his parents had said it before him, and as all good Bostonians had habitually pronounced it, with the broad sound that is universal among Englishmen, except-as Mr. Thomas Hardy has lately assured me — in the Wessex region; while this sarcastic young political critic, on the other hand, representing the Western and Southern and Irish mode of speech, treated this tradition of boyhood as a mere bit of a
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, Index. (search)
anmer, Sidney, 230. Laplace, Marquis de, 50, 51. Lamed, Mr., 83. Laura, 76. Lazarus, Emma, 314. Le Barnes, J. W., 231, 232, 240. Lee, Mrs., Thomas, 87. Leighton, Caroline (Andrews), 129. Leland, C. G., 312, 314. Leroux, Pierre, 86. Lewes, Mrs. (George Eliot), 219. Lincoln, Abraham, 239, 261. Linnaeus, Charles von, 89, 92. literary London twenty years ago, 271-297. literary Paris twenty years ago, 298-325. Literature and Oratory compared, 360. Locke, John, 700. Lodge, H. C., 352. Long, J. D., 337, 354. Longfellow, H. W., 12, 13, 33, 54, 55, 67, 95, 101, 1002, 103, 1168, 171, 176, 178, 179, 180, 189, 313, 314, 331, 345. Longfellow, Samuel, 105. Loring, E. G., 141. Loring, G. B., 176. L'Ouverture, Toussaint, 270. Lovering, Joseph, 53, 54. Lowell, Charles, 103. Lowell, J. R., 24, 28, 37, 42, 53, 55, 67, 700, 75, 76, 77, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 103, 110, 118, 126, 128, 168, 1700 171, 173, 174, 176, 178, 179, 180, 182, 184, 186, 295. Lowell, John, 5. Lowel
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
l romances, whose appeal does not carry beyond the teachers' circle. Chief among these is William Hawley Smith's Evolution of Dodd, remarkable for its early failure due to the prejudice against the title, its later success, and the fact that though over a million copies have been sold the author received not a penny. A number of volumes of memoirs furnish valuable literary materials of education. The works of Henry James have been mentioned. The reminiscences of Senator Hoar and of Senator Lodge give illuminating accounts of mid-century New England education. More recently and at greater length, Professor Brander Matthews has performed a similar service for New York. Most important of all is the recent volume entitled The education of Henry Adams (1908, 1916). More frankly devoted to the educational aspect of experience than any other autobiographical work, vying with them all in literary charm, this study by one of the most reflective students and keenest observers of the gen
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