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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 46 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 36 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 15, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Godfrey, Thomas 1704-1749 (search)
odfrey, Thomas 1704-1749 Inventor; born in Bristol, Pa., in 1704; was by trade a glazier, and became a self-taught mathematician. In 1730 he communicated to James Logan, who had befriended him, an improvement on Davis's quadrant. In May, 1742, Logan addressed a letter to Dr. Edmund Hadley, in England, describing fully Godfrey'Logan addressed a letter to Dr. Edmund Hadley, in England, describing fully Godfrey's instrument. Hadley did not notice it, when Logan sent a copy of this letter to Hadley, together with Godfrey's account of his inventions, to a friend, to be placed before the Royal Society. Hadley, the vice-president, had presented a paper, a year before describing a reflecting-quadrant like Godfrey's. They both seem to have hiLogan sent a copy of this letter to Hadley, together with Godfrey's account of his inventions, to a friend, to be placed before the Royal Society. Hadley, the vice-president, had presented a paper, a year before describing a reflecting-quadrant like Godfrey's. They both seem to have hit upon the same invention; and the society, deciding that both were entitled to the honor, sent Godfrey household furniture of the value of $1,000. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., in December, 1749.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Logan 1725- (search)
about 1725; received his English name from James Logan, secretary of the province of Pennsylvania;eal to any white man to say if he ever entered Logan's cabin hungry and he gave him no meat; if he ng the course of the last long and bloody war, Logan remained idle in his cabin, an advocate for pemy countrymen pointed as they passed and said, Logan is the friend of the white man. I had even th and unprovoked, murdered all the relations of Logan, not even sparing my women and children. Thisbor the thought that mine is the joy of fear. Logan never felt fear. He will not turn on his heel to save his life. Who is there to mourn for Logan? Not one! Logan was mistaken; it was not CresLogan was mistaken; it was not Cresap who led the band of assassins. He was not then in that region. Logan's speech was translated Logan's speech was translated into English, and was pronounced inimitable for eloquence and pathos. Logan fought the white peoplLogan fought the white people desperately afterwards, when occasion offered, in the West. At a council held at Detroit, in 178
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Logan, James 1674- (search)
Logan, James 1674- Statesman; born in Lurgan, Ireland, Oct. 20, 1674; was an accomplished scholar and linguist. In 1699 he accepted the invitation of William Penn to become the secretary of his province of Pennsylvania; and when the proprietor returned to England in 1701, he left Logan intrusted with important executive offices, which he filled with zeal, ability, and good judgment. He was chief-justice of the province. On the death of Gordon (1736), so long the faithful guardian of the proprietor's rights, Logan, as president of the council, administered the government for two years. Logan was always the friend of the Indians. At his death, near Philadelphia, Oct. 31, 1751, he left his valuable library of 2,000 volumes to the ci Logan, as president of the council, administered the government for two years. Logan was always the friend of the Indians. At his death, near Philadelphia, Oct. 31, 1751, he left his valuable library of 2,000 volumes to the city of Philadelphia.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Penn, William 1644- (search)
. It was constructed in 1683, at an expense of about $35,000. In 1700 his city residence in Philadelphia was the Slate-roof House, on the northeast corner of Second Street and Norris's Alley. It was a spacious building for the time, constructed of brick and covered with slate. It was built for another in 1690. Penn occupied it while lie remained in America, and there his son, John Penn, governor of Pennsylvania when the Revolution broke out, was born. In that house the agent of Penn (James Logan) entertained Lord Cornbury, of New York, and his suite of fifty persons. The house was purchased by William Trent, the founder of Trenton. Arnold occupied it as his headquarters in 1778, and lived there in extravagant style. Essay towards the present and future peace of Europe. This was published by Penn in the latter part of the year 1693-94, while war was raging on the Continent. Penn sought to show the desirableness of peace and the truest means of it at that time and for the fut
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of Pennsylvania, (search)
vania Oil Refinery. of Lloyd's memorial upon their predecessors. The friends of Penn, headed by Logan, secured a majority the next year, which voted an affectionate address to the proprietary. But vexatious troubles soon broke out again. Complaints were sent to Penn against Evans and Logan. The former was dissipated, and had corrupted William, the eldest son of Penn, who became a companion o was superseded by Charles Gookin. He found the Assembly in a bad humor, because Penn sustained Logan, whom they denounced as an enemy to the welfare of the province, and abusive of the representatives of the people. Logan went to England, and, returning, brought a letter from Penn to the Assembly, giving an outline history of his efforts in settling his province, and intimating that, unless Deputy Governor1709 Sir William KeithDeputy Governor1717 Patrick GordonDeputy Governor1726 James LoganPresident1736 George ThomasDeputy Governor1738 Anthony PalmerPresident1747 James HamiltonDe
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
Literary history of the American Revolution, 135 n. Literary magazine, the, 292 Literary world, the, 239 Little Beach Bird, the, 278 Littlepage manuscripts, 304-305 Little people of the snow, 273, 281 Lives (Plutarch), 93 Lives of distinguished American naval officers, 302 Livingston, Brockholst, 246 Livingston, William, 118, 119, 121, 162 Locke, 57, 58, 66, 70 n., 81, 93, 116, 1 8, 329, 334 Locke Amsden, 310 Lockhart, 305 Logan, 309 Logan, C. A., 228 Logan, James, 189 Loiterer, the, 234 London chronicle, the, 129, 140 London magazine, the, 121 Long, Major S. H., 205, 210 Longfellow, 166, 212, 244, 261, 262, 273, 355 Looking Glass for the times, a, 151 Love in 1876, 226 Lowell, James Russell, 241, 244, 249, 261, 268, 270, 276, 279, 282, 341, 344 Lucretius, 269 Lycidas, 274 Lyell, Sir, Charles, 186, 207 Lyon, Richard, 156 Lyrical ballads, 183, 262, 262 n. Lytton, Lord, 243 M McDonough, Thomas, 222 McFingal
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters, Chapter 3: the third and fourth generation (search)
g exceptions, men trained in Latin and Greek, familiar with the great outlines of human history, accustomed to the discipline of academic disputation. They knew the ideas and the vocabulary of cultivated Europe and were conscious of no provincial inferiority. In the study of the physical sciences, likewise, the colonials were but little behind the mother country. The Royal Society had its distinguished members here. The Mathers, the Dudleys, John Winthrop of Connecticut, John Bartram, James Logan, James Godfrey, Cadwallader Colden, and above all, Franklin himself, were winning the respect of European students, and were teaching Americans to use their eyes and their minds not merely upon the records of the past but in searching out the inexhaustible meanings of the present. There is no more fascinating story than that of the beginnings of American science in and outside of the colleges, and this movement, like the influence of journalism and of the higher education, counted for c
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
States counts today a body of economic thinkers superior in numbers and not inferior in quality to those of any other country, who are devoting themselves with conspicuous success and from many different points of view to the elucidation of the complex principles that underlie modern economic life. Note.—On page 427 the four following important tracts were omitted: Francis Rawles's Ways and means for the inhabitants of Delaware to become rich (Philadelphia, 1725); a reply to the same by James Logan, A dialogue shewing what's therein to be found. A motto being Modish for want of good Latin, are put English quotations (n. p., 1725); Cadwallader Colden, Papers relating to an Act of Assembly of the Province of New York, for encouragement of the Indian trade, etc. And for Prohibiting the selling of Indian goods to the French, viz. Of Canada (New York, 1724); Joseph Morgan, The nature of Riches, shewed from the natural reasons of the use and effects thereof (Philadelphia, 1732). Chap
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of the companies. (search)
ohn Dority, Samuel Dority, Wm. Dority, John Dougherty, died in Camp Douglas, October 2, 1864, of pneumonia; Charles B. Ecton, now a member of the Kentucky Senate; Casswell Epperson, John Fields, Wm. French, John Goode, John Gruelle, deserted October, 1862, and joined the Federal Army; Michael Haggard, Robert Hogan, Joe S. Hood, Henry Hugeley, James Hugeley, John Jones, Robert Knox, died in Camp Douglas, October 21, 1864, of chronic diarrhoea; David Larison, Robert Lawrence, George Leslie, James Logan, Alfred Martin, Elisha Ogden, Thomas Parris, Archie Piersall, J. H. Reed, promoted to assistant quartermaster sergeant; John Shay, Willis F. Spahr, promoted to quartermaster sergeant; John Stivers, F. M. Stone, Raleigh Sutherland, regimental farrier; T. B. Stuart, John Tate, Wm. Tate, Wm. Taylor, Obadiah B. Tracy, died in Camp Douglas, February 17, 1864, of chronic diarrhoea; Henry Turner, Wm. Taylor, Howard Watts, J. A. Watts.—seventy officers and enlisted men. Company D. Company D
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Narrative and legendary poems (search)
uits well their habitation,— We find convenience for their occupation.” Pastorius seems to have been on intimate terms with William Penn, Thomas Lloyd, Chief Justice Logan, Thomas Story, and other leading men in the Province belonging to his own religious society, as also with Kelpius, the learned Mystic of the Wissahickon, wiy. Thomas Lloyd was a ripe and rare scholar. The great Loganian Library of Philadelphia bears witness to the varied learning and classical taste of its donor, James Logan. Thomas Story, member of the Council of State, Master of the Rolls, and Commissioner of Claims under William Penn, and an able minister of his Society, took a deep interest in scientific questions, and in a letter to his friend Logan, written while on a religious visit to Great Britain, seems to have anticipated the conclusion of modern geologists. ‘I spent,’ he says, ‘some months, especially at Scarborough, during the season attending meetings, at whose high cliffs and the variety of
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