Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for James Logan or search for James Logan in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Godfrey, Thomas 1704-1749 (search)
odfrey, Thomas 1704-1749 Inventor; born in Bristol, Pa., in 1704; was by trade a glazier, and became a self-taught mathematician. In 1730 he communicated to James Logan, who had befriended him, an improvement on Davis's quadrant. In May, 1742, Logan addressed a letter to Dr. Edmund Hadley, in England, describing fully Godfrey'Logan addressed a letter to Dr. Edmund Hadley, in England, describing fully Godfrey's instrument. Hadley did not notice it, when Logan sent a copy of this letter to Hadley, together with Godfrey's account of his inventions, to a friend, to be placed before the Royal Society. Hadley, the vice-president, had presented a paper, a year before describing a reflecting-quadrant like Godfrey's. They both seem to have hiLogan sent a copy of this letter to Hadley, together with Godfrey's account of his inventions, to a friend, to be placed before the Royal Society. Hadley, the vice-president, had presented a paper, a year before describing a reflecting-quadrant like Godfrey's. They both seem to have hit upon the same invention; and the society, deciding that both were entitled to the honor, sent Godfrey household furniture of the value of $1,000. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., in December, 1749.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Logan 1725- (search)
about 1725; received his English name from James Logan, secretary of the province of Pennsylvania;eal to any white man to say if he ever entered Logan's cabin hungry and he gave him no meat; if he ng the course of the last long and bloody war, Logan remained idle in his cabin, an advocate for pemy countrymen pointed as they passed and said, Logan is the friend of the white man. I had even th and unprovoked, murdered all the relations of Logan, not even sparing my women and children. Thisbor the thought that mine is the joy of fear. Logan never felt fear. He will not turn on his heel to save his life. Who is there to mourn for Logan? Not one! Logan was mistaken; it was not CresLogan was mistaken; it was not Cresap who led the band of assassins. He was not then in that region. Logan's speech was translated Logan's speech was translated into English, and was pronounced inimitable for eloquence and pathos. Logan fought the white peoplLogan fought the white people desperately afterwards, when occasion offered, in the West. At a council held at Detroit, in 178
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Logan, James 1674- (search)
Logan, James 1674- Statesman; born in Lurgan, Ireland, Oct. 20, 1674; was an accomplished scholar and linguist. In 1699 he accepted the invitation of William Penn to become the secretary of his province of Pennsylvania; and when the proprietor returned to England in 1701, he left Logan intrusted with important executive offices, which he filled with zeal, ability, and good judgment. He was chief-justice of the province. On the death of Gordon (1736), so long the faithful guardian of the proprietor's rights, Logan, as president of the council, administered the government for two years. Logan was always the friend of the Indians. At his death, near Philadelphia, Oct. 31, 1751, he left his valuable library of 2,000 volumes to the ci Logan, as president of the council, administered the government for two years. Logan was always the friend of the Indians. At his death, near Philadelphia, Oct. 31, 1751, he left his valuable library of 2,000 volumes to the city of Philadelphia.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Penn, William 1644- (search)
. It was constructed in 1683, at an expense of about $35,000. In 1700 his city residence in Philadelphia was the Slate-roof House, on the northeast corner of Second Street and Norris's Alley. It was a spacious building for the time, constructed of brick and covered with slate. It was built for another in 1690. Penn occupied it while lie remained in America, and there his son, John Penn, governor of Pennsylvania when the Revolution broke out, was born. In that house the agent of Penn (James Logan) entertained Lord Cornbury, of New York, and his suite of fifty persons. The house was purchased by William Trent, the founder of Trenton. Arnold occupied it as his headquarters in 1778, and lived there in extravagant style. Essay towards the present and future peace of Europe. This was published by Penn in the latter part of the year 1693-94, while war was raging on the Continent. Penn sought to show the desirableness of peace and the truest means of it at that time and for the fut
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of Pennsylvania, (search)
vania Oil Refinery. of Lloyd's memorial upon their predecessors. The friends of Penn, headed by Logan, secured a majority the next year, which voted an affectionate address to the proprietary. But vexatious troubles soon broke out again. Complaints were sent to Penn against Evans and Logan. The former was dissipated, and had corrupted William, the eldest son of Penn, who became a companion o was superseded by Charles Gookin. He found the Assembly in a bad humor, because Penn sustained Logan, whom they denounced as an enemy to the welfare of the province, and abusive of the representatives of the people. Logan went to England, and, returning, brought a letter from Penn to the Assembly, giving an outline history of his efforts in settling his province, and intimating that, unless Deputy Governor1709 Sir William KeithDeputy Governor1717 Patrick GordonDeputy Governor1726 James LoganPresident1736 George ThomasDeputy Governor1738 Anthony PalmerPresident1747 James HamiltonDe