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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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ghth Florida regiment, numbering about one hundred and fifty men, was put in position to the left of Colonel Fizer, and in easy range of the enemy above the upper bridge, then being rapidly constructed by them. This battalion was commanded by Captain Long, and, while under his direction, it acted gallantly and did good service--Captain Long proving himself a gallant and efficient officer; but he was severely wounded about eleven o'clock A. M., and the battalion then rendered but little assistanCaptain Long proving himself a gallant and efficient officer; but he was severely wounded about eleven o'clock A. M., and the battalion then rendered but little assistance. I call your attention to the special report of Lieutenant-Colonel Fizer on the subject, and to Captain Govan, in relation to the conduct of three companies of the same regiment, which were on duty with the right of Colonel Fizer's regiment, and also to the indorsement of Colonel Humphries, on the special report of Captain Govan. The brigade of General Barksdale, I consider, did their whole duty, and in a manner highly creditable to every officer and man engaged in the fight. An examinatio
ant-Colonel Cole, chief commissary of its subsistence, and Lieutenant-Colonel Baldwin, chief of ordnance, was everywhere on the field, attending to the wants of his department. General Chilton, chief of staff, Lieutenant-Colonel Murray, Major Peyton, and Captain Young, of the Adjutant and Inspector General's department, were active in seeing to the execution of orders. Lieutenant-Colonel Smith and Captain Johnston, of the engineers, in reconnoitring the enemy and constructing batteries; Colonel Long, in posting troops and artillery; Majors Taylor, Talcott, Marshall, and Venable were engaged night and day in watching the operations, carrying orders, &c. Respectfully submitted, R. E. Lee, General. Report of Major-General Stuart. headquarters Second corps, army of Northern Virginia, May 6, 1863. Brigadier-General R. H. Chilton, A. A. and I. G., Headquarters Army of Northern Virginia: General: I have the honor to submit, in advance of a detailed report, the following narr
staff, many thanks are due for their efficiency and promptness in carrying orders to all parts of the field. My Medical Director, Surgeon Marks, and the medical officers of the division, were untiring in their exertions to alleviate the sufferings of the wounded, and to them my thanks are due. My escort, composed of the following named men of the Third Kentucky cavalry, who accompanied me throughout the engagement, deserve special mention for their good conduct: Sergeant Wm. C. Miles; privates Geo. Long, Thomas Salyers, John Christian, John Whitten, James Bowen, B. Hammerslein, R. A. Novah. Private Bowen's horse was killed by a cannon ball. The loss of the division was as follows: Killed, 260; wounded, 1,005; missing, 1,280; total, 2,545. The missing are supposed to have been captured. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, R. W. Johnson, Brigadier General, commanding. Brigadier General Jeff. C. Davis' report. headquarters First division, right wing, Janua
xamine the ground between them and the enemy. Whilst so engaged, I met Brigadier-General Long, who proposed to place some of his artillery upon a slight eminence whiion, was driven back. The enemy's skirmishers advanced through the gap, and General Long found it impracticable to post his artillery. Perry's brigade checked the fy's and Posey's brigade then drove back the enemy's line of skirmishers, and General Long's artillery got into position; but it was now nearly dark, and, after a few o much, could be taken almost in rear. He informed me at the same time that General Long would have up a number of guns in a few minutes, and as one of Lieutenant Prd it imprudent to open with one gun, and ordered the Lieutenant to report to General Long as soon as he came up, and desired him to open immediately. Returning to oleon guns, under Lieutenant Price, reported to Lieutenant-Colonel Jones, of General Long's command, and was engaged late in the afternoon, without suffering any loss
Rogers ville, on the Beach Creek road, near dark, we halted to feed and cook rations. Here it was ascertained the road leading to Smith's and Dodson's Fords ran within six miles of the camps of the enemy. It was also ascertained both fords were difficult and dangerous, and the night was dark and rainy. To reach the point assigned me by the hour designated, required me to cross the Holston before daylight By intricate mountain paths, exacting the ut most care on the part of all, we reached Long's shoals, twelve miles above Rogersville, and crossed in safety. Reaching the old stage road, nothing could be heard of Colonel Giltner's command, but I determined to turn the position of the enemy at the mouth of Big Creek, by way of the Carter's Valley road, my brigade crossing the old stage road for this purpose. Soon a messenger overtook me with tidings of Colonel Giltner, also reporting about one hundred Federal Tennessee home guards at Kincael's. Pushing ahead part of the Eighth Virgi
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
448 Livingstone, Henry, 163, 334 Lloyd, Henry D., 358 Locke, Edward, 282 Locke, John, 227, 228, 263 Locke Amsden, or the schoolmaster, 416 Lockhart, 96 Lockwood, Lieut., 169 Lodge, Henry Cabot, 302, 354, 419 Loeb, James, 491 n. Logan, George, 431 Logan, (Indian Chief), 613 Logan, Olive, 275, 276 Logan, William, 445 Logic, 234 Log of a cowboy, the, 161 Loher, 578 Lomax, John A., 513 London, Jack, 94 Lone Fish Ball, The, 463 London Films, 83 Long, George, 459, 477, 479 Long, J. L., 282 Longfellow, 35, 36, 60, 77, 119, 305, 306, 313, 416, 455, 459, 460, 488, 489, 490, 500, 549, 579, 581, 619 Looking backward, 86, 360 Lord, E., 438 Lord, Nathan, 345 Lord Chumley, 276 Lord lovel, 507 Lord of all being Throned Afar 499 Lord Randall, 507 Lorenz, K., 582 Loretta, 512 Lorgnette, the, 110 Lorla, 512 L'Orleanais, 592 Los Gringos, 142 Lost cause, the, 182 Lotus Eaters, I 14 Lotze, 240, 240 n., 244 Lou
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
old; Mr. Trist, a young Louisianian, who has married her fourth daughter; Miss Ellen; two other daughters, of eighteen and twenty; Mrs. Trist; four sons under sixteen; Mr. Harrison, a young lawyer of Harrisburg, who lately studied at Cambridge; Mr. Long, Mr. George Long, since well known by his various contributions to classical scholarship. just from Cambridge, England, apparently an excellent scholar, and now a professor in the University at Charlottesville; Mr. Webster; and ourselves. . .Mr. George Long, since well known by his various contributions to classical scholarship. just from Cambridge, England, apparently an excellent scholar, and now a professor in the University at Charlottesville; Mr. Webster; and ourselves. . . . Yesterday we formed a party, and, with Mr. Jefferson at our head, went to the University. See ante, p. 303. It is a very fine establishment, consisting of ten houses for professors, four eating-houses, a rotunda on the model of the Parthenon, with a magnificent room for a library, and four fine lecture-rooms, with one hundred and eight apartments for students; the whole situated in the midst of two hundred and fifty acres of land, high, healthy, and with noble prospects all around it.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
Thomas (Lady Theresa), 407 and note, 418. Litton, Mr., 421. Liverpool, visits, 49, 297, 298, 402-404. Livingston, Edward, 123, 350, 351, 380, 381, 382. Livingston, Judge, 39. Livingston, Mr. and Mrs. Maturin, 386. Livingston, Mrs., Edward, 350, 351, 381, 382. Llangollen, visits, 51, 52. Lloyd, Professor, 405. Lockhart, Mrs. J. G., 407. Lohrmann, W. G., 459, 482. London, visits, 51, 54-68, 251, 263-267, 289-298, 406-418, 445-449. London, Tower of, 446, 447. Long, George, Professor, 348. Longfellow, Henry W., 399. Longfellow, Stephen, 14. Loretto, visits, 167. Louvois, Marchioness de, 253. Lovell, Mrs., 286. Lowe, Rev. Mr., 440, 441, 446. Lowell, John, 339, 356, 360. Lowenstein-Wertheim, Princess, 487, 489. Lund, 177. Luittichau, Madame Ida de, 476, 481, 482, 483, 485, 491. Luttichau, M. de, 476 and note, 491. Luxmoore, the Misses, 432 note. Lyman, Mrs., Theodore, 10. Lynch, John, 389 note. Lyndhurst, Lord, Chancellor, 443. M
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
1, 382, II. 118, 488. Livingston, Judge, I. 39. Livingston, Mr. and Mrs. Maturin, I. 886. Livingston, Mrs., Edward, I. 350, 351, 381, 382, II. 488. Llangollen, visits, I. 51, 52. Lloyd, Professor, I. 405. Lockhart, John G., II. 147, 179, 189. Lockhart, Mrs. J. G., I. 407. Lohrmann, W. G., I. 459, 482. London, Tower of, I 446, 447. London, visits, I. 51, 54-68, 251, 263-267, 289-298, 406-418. 445-449, II. 144-155, 175-183, 311, 812, 321-327, 357-376, 378-387. Long, Professor, George, I. 348. Longfellow, Henry W., I. 399, II. 196, 204, 479. Longfellow, Stephen, I. 14. Loretto, visits, I. 167. Lough, John Graham, II. 152. Louis Philippe, King of the French, II. 16, 19, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 121, 122, 135. Louvois, Marchioness de, I. 253. Lovell, Mrs., I. 286, II. 166. Lovering, Professor J., II. 310. Lowe, Rev Mr., I. 440, 441, 445. Lowe, Right Hon Robert, II. 380. Lowell, John, I. 389, 356, 360 Lowenstein—Wertheim, Princess, I. 487,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Paroles of the Army of Northern Virginia. (search)
rporal J. W. Dickson, D. M. Tisdale, Private B. E. Boyle, E. G. Brown, F. M. Frey, J. R. P. Hair, J. H. Hooks, G. W. Mims, J. A. Mored, A. L. Shields, B. E. Wilson, B. J. Massey. Co. F. 1st Sergeant W. L. Marett, 4th Sergeant S. H. Howard, 5th Sergeant D. T. Barr, 3d Corporal R. V. Gantt, 4th Corporal T. H. Derrick, Private S. F. Cullam, T. W. Dunkin, M. Gunter, H. N. Gable, Wm. Gable, L. Hallman, N. Hallman, Wm. Johnson, V. Knuse, Wm. Laminick, Private George Long, J. M. Nettles, J. D. Quattlebaum, Wm. Reid, Henry Rickard, Ansel Rawls, E. J. Rawls, J. J. Shealey, J. W. Spann, N. B. Steedman, J. S. Wingard, J. T. Wingard, James Taylor, J. E. Waters. Co. G. 1st Sergeant E. M. Kirkpatrick, 2d Sergeant D. C. McKinney, 3d Sergeant R. C. Stevenson, 4th Sergeant H. C. Conner, 5th Sergeant O. J. Gwinn, 1st Corporal R. T. Gillespie, 2d Corporal J. T. Hall, 3d Corporal J. P. Hambright, Private J. A. Adams, J.