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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nindemann, William Friedrich Carl 1850- (search)
rer; born in Gingst, Germany, April 22, 1850; came to the United States in 1867; accompanied the Arctic explorers on the Polaris in 1871. the Polaris was caught in the ice in the autumn of 1872, and began to leak so badly that it was found necessary to land provisions. While busy at this task the ice-floe upon which Nindemann and eighteen of the crew were working broke loose and floated southward for 196 days. On April 29, 1873, they were picked up by the steamer Tigress. Later he served on this vessel when she went in search of the Polaris. In 1873 he shipped on board the Jeannette for another Arctic voyage. Four years later Captain De Long sent him and Louis P. Noros in search of aid. After travelling southward for twelve days they found a native who conducted them to Kumak Surka, from which they sent word to Corn. George Melville, who later met them. On March 15, 1882, Nindemann, Melville, and J. H. Bartlett found the bodies of De Long and his crew. See Arctic explorations.
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 8: divers good causes 1890-1896; aet. 71-77 (search)
o my birthday. The Springfield republican has a bit about it, with a good and gratifying poem from Sanborn. Really, dear, between you and me what a old humbug it is! But no matter — if people will take me for much better than I am, I can't help it, and must only try to live up to my reputation. ... I received a good letter from you, a little scolding at first, but soft rebukes with blessings ended, as Longfellow describes the admonitions of his first wife.... At the Suffrage Festival, Governor Long presided, and in introducing me waved a branch of lilies, saying, In the beauty of the lilies she is still, at seventy-five. Now that I call handsome, don't you?... Flossy had a very successful afternoon tea while I was with her. She had three ladies of the Civitas Club and invited about one hundred of her neighbors to hear them read papers. It was n't suffrage, but it was good government, which is about the same thing. The parlors looked very pretty. I should think seventy or eig
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Stepping westward 1901-1902; aet. 82-83 (search)
know that I love the Club and love the world of my own time, so far as I know it. They called me Queen and kissed my hand. When I came home I fell in spirit before the feet of the dear God, thanking Him for the regard shown me, and praying that it might not for one moment make me vain. I read my translation of Horace's ode, Quis Desiderio, and it really seemed to suit the mention made by Mrs. Cheney of our departed members, praecipue, Dr. Zack; Dr. Hoder [?] of England was there, and ex-Governor Long and T. W. Higginson, also Agnes Irwin. It was a great time. July 5.... I wrote to Ethel V. Partridge, Omaha, a high-school student: Get all the education that you can. Cultivate habits of studious thought with all that books can teach. The fulfilment of the nearest duty gives the best education. I fear that I have come to know this by doing the exact opposite, i.e., neglecting much of the nearest duty in the pursuit of an intellectual wisdom which I have not attained.... Maud a