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Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for John S. Long or search for John S. Long in all documents.

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nnsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel Baynton J. Hickman. Eighty-second Pennsylvania, Colonel Isaac C. Bassett. One Hundred and Nineteenth Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel Gideon Clark. Second Rhode Island (battalion), Captain Elisha H. Rhodes. Fifth Wisconsin (battalion), Major Charles W. Kempf. Second division: Brigadier-General George W. Getty. first brigade: Brigadier-General Frank Wheaton. Sixty-second New York, Lieutenant-Colonel Theo. B. Hamilton. Ninety-third Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel John S. Long. Ninety-eighth Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel John B. Kohler. One Hundred and Second Pennsylvania, Major James H. Coleman. One Hundred and Thirty-ninth Pennsylvania, Major Robert Mullroe. Second brigade: Colonel James M. Warner. Lieutenant-Colonel Amasa S. Tracy. Superintended a portion of the line. Second Vermont, Major Enoch E. Johnson. Third and Fourth Vermont, Major Horace W. Floyd. Fifth Vermont, Captain Addison Brown, Jr. Sixth Vermont, Captain Martin W. Davis. Elev
resistance, and as he did so the Eighth New York and First Connecticut, in a charge in column, broke through the opening made by Custer, and continued on through the town of Waynesboroa, never stopping till they crossed South River. There, finding themselves immediately in the enemy's rear, they promptly formed as foragers and held the east bank of the stream till all the Confederates surrendered except Rosser, who succeeded in making his way back to the valley, and Generals Early, Wharton, Long, and Lilley, who, with fifteen or twenty men, escaped across the Blue Ridge. I followed up the victory immediately by despatching Capehart through Rock-fish Gap, with orders to encamp on the east side of the Blue Ridge. By reason of this move all the enemy's stores and transportation fell into our hands, while we captured on the field seventeen battle flags, sixteen hundred officers and men, and eleven pieces of artillery. This decisive victory closed hostilities in the Shenandoah Valley.