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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 52 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 2 0 Browse Search
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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4: girlhood 1839-1843; aet. 20-23 (search)
you a distaste for all wolves, she says, not excepting those Long fellows, Longfellow had lent her Beowulf. I do not know what will! ) Annie tells of opening trs, and talked as usual with Sumner, Hillard, George S. Hillard. Longo, Longfellow. etc. I was quite pleased that Boz recognized Fanny Appleton and myself, and lter ego, the brother of his heart; others of his intimates at that time were Longfellow, George Hillard, Cornelius Felton, Henry Cleveland. This little knot of frieo their brother Henry, and was the lifelong friend of all three sisters. Here Longfellow and Sumner often visited them, and here Julia first heard of the Chevalier an and the soul has been inspired into her; and her wickedness shall cease. Longfellow's letter to Dr. Howe also has been preserved among the precious relics of thess at knowing you are so happy; and believe me Ever sincerely your friend, Longfellow. Cambridge, Feb. 20, 1843. At the same time Diva writes to her brother Sam:--
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: passion flowers 1852-1858; aet. 33-39 (search)
you hear? So far my secret has been pretty well kept. My book is to bear a simple title without my name, according to Longfellow's advice. Longfellow has been reading a part of the volume in sheets. He says it will make a sensation.... I feel mucLongfellow has been reading a part of the volume in sheets. He says it will make a sensation.... I feel much excited, quite unsettled, sometimes a little frantic. If I succeed, I feel that I shall be humbled by my happiness, devoutly thankful to God. Now, I will not write any more about it. The warmest praise came from the poets,--the high, impassionle, Passion Flowers, was invented by Scherb A German scholar, at this time an habitue of the house. and approved by Longfellow. Its success became certain at once. Hundreds of copies have already been sold, and every one likes it. Fields foreteh, Rhode Island, to her sister Annie Sunday, August 5. ... I went in town [Newport] the other day, and dined with Fanny Longfellow. The L.'s, Curtis, George William Curtis. Tommo, Thomas Gold Appleton. and Kensett are all living together, b
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Greece and other lands 1867; aet. 48 (search)
dollars were raised for Crete, and in March, 1867, Dr. Howe sailed again for Greece on an errand of mercy. The Journal gives an outline of the busy winter:-- The post is the poor man's valet.... January 12. A busy and studious day; had the neighbors in after tea. Want clamors for relief, but calls for cure, which begins in discipline .... January 24. N. P. Willis's funeral. Chev came home quite suddenly and asked me to go with him to the church, St. Paul's. The pallbearers were Longfellow and Lowell, Drs. Holmes and Howe, Whipple and Fields, T. B. Aldrich and I don't know who. Coffin covered with flowers. Appearance of the family interesting: the widow bowed and closely shrouded. Thus ends a man of perhaps first-rate genius, ruined by the adoption of an utterly frivolous standard of labor and of life. George IV and Bulwer have to answer for some of these failures. My tea party was delightful, friendly, not fashionable. We had a good talk, and a lovely, familiar time.
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 17: the woman's cause 1868-1910 (search)
off beefsteak, porksteak, etc., and we make a comfortable meal. I desire to purchase some dried buffalo meat, and find some, not without difficulty, as the season for selling it is nearly over. The crowning romance of the day is a sleighride of five miles on the Mississippi, giving us a near view of its fluted bluffs and numerous islets. We visit also the Falls of Minnehaha, now sheeted in ice, but very beautiful, even in this disguise. We talk of Hiawatha, and my companion says, If Mr. Longfellow had ever seen a Sioux Indian, he would not have written Hiawatha. The way to the bottom of the falls is so slippery with ice that I conclude not to attempt it. The day, which was one of great exposure, passed in great pleasure, and without chill or fatigue. ... In my days of romance, I remember watching late one night on board the Mediterranean steamer in order to be sure of the moment in which we should pass beyond the boundaries of the Italian shore. Something like such a feeling
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: Newport 1879-1882; aet. 60-63 (search)
book, Duties of Women, which I am reviewing for the Christian Register. ... To Laura 129 Mount Vernon Street, February 27, 1881. My dearest Laura, ... Mr. Longfellow came to see us yesterday, and told us his curious dreams. In one of them, he went to London and found James Russell Lowell keeping a grocery. In another, peorehend any features of the unseen world. My belief in it does not change, but my imagination refuses to act upon the basis of the things not seen. March 5. Longfellow to dine. March 30. In the evening to the ever-pleasing Hasty-Pudding Theatrical Play, a burlesque of Victor Hugo's Notre Dame de Paris, with many saucy inter we will have such high Jinks! ... Beacon Street looks as though it wanted something. I think thou beest it ... Am ever thy lame game Mother. March 24. Longfellow died at about 3.30 P. M. today. He will be much and deservedly lamented. The last of dear Chev's old set, the Five of Clubs, nicknamed by Mary Dwight the Mutu
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: more changes--1886-1888; aet. 67-69 (search)
rief notes of comings and goings, of speaking and preaching, writing and reading. She works hard to finish her paper on Women in the Three Professions, Law, Medicine, and Theology, for the Chautauquan. Very tired afterwards. She speaks at the Newport Opera House with Mrs. Livermore (who said she did not know Mrs. Howe could speak so well); she takes part in the Authors' Reading for the Longfellow Memorial in the Boston Museum, reciting Our orders and the Battle Hymn, with her lines to Longfellow recently composed. I wore my velvet gown, my mother's lace, Uncle Sam's Saint Esprit, and did my best, as did all the others. The next day she speaks at a suffrage meeting in Providence, and makes this comment:-- Woman suffrage represents individual right, integral humanity, ideal justice. I spoke of the attitude and action of Minerva in the Eumenides; Cf. Aeschylus. her resistance to the Furies, who I said personified popular passion fortified by ancient tradition; her firm s
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
hear Stopford Brooke in the morning, an interesting sermon... He called the Agnostics and Nirvanists a type found in many classes, but not a class. ... June 27. To lunch with Mrs. Harland. Very pleasant. Edmund Gosse was the guest invited to meet me. He was vivacious, easy, and agreeable. Also the composer Marzials.... June 28. To Westminster Abbey. To Alice, its interest seemed inexhaustible. It is so, indeed, had one time to be strewing violets all the time, as E. B. B. said. Longfellow's bust has been placed there since my last visit; the likeness is good. I wandered about as long as my feet would carry me, thinking sometimes of Gray's question, Can storied urn, etc. The Harlands came later and brought the composer of Twickenham Ferry. With Alice to dine at Toynbee Hall. A pleasant dinner. A bright young man, Bruce by name, related to Abyssinian Bruce, took Alice in to dinner — sitting afterwards in Ames's room, where we met an alderman, a bricklayer, a trades' union
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 8: divers good causes 1890-1896; aet. 71-77 (search)
241 Beacon Street, May 31, 1894. My dearest child, I send you a budget of tributes to my birthday. The Springfield republican has a bit about it, with a good and gratifying poem from Sanborn. Really, dear, between you and me what a old humbug it is! But no matter — if people will take me for much better than I am, I can't help it, and must only try to live up to my reputation. ... I received a good letter from you, a little scolding at first, but soft rebukes with blessings ended, as Longfellow describes the admonitions of his first wife.... At the Suffrage Festival, Governor Long presided, and in introducing me waved a branch of lilies, saying, In the beauty of the lilies she is still, at seventy-five. Now that I call handsome, don't you?... Flossy had a very successful afternoon tea while I was with her. She had three ladies of the Civitas Club and invited about one hundred of her neighbors to hear them read papers. It was n't suffrage, but it was good government, which is
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: in the house of labor 1896-1897; aet. 77-78 (search)
give me a handwriting on the wall, that I may truly know what I can do for these people. And I resolved not to go back from the purpose which prompted this prayer. Arrived at St. John [New Brunswick] and was made very welcome. Reception in the evening by the ladies of the Council. Speeches: Rev. Mr. De Wars, Anglican minister, spoke of our taking A. A.W. to England. I wondered if this was my handwriting on the wall. October 10. Wheaton Seminary Club, Vendome. Reminiscences of Longfellow and Emerson.... As I was leaving one lady said to me, Mrs. Howe, you have shocked me very much, and I think that when you go to the other world, you will be sorry that you did not stay as you were, i.e., Orthodox instead of Unitarian. Miss Emerson apologized to me for this rather uncivil greeting. I feel sure that the lady misunderstood something in my lecture. What, I could not tell. November 1. The Communion service was very delightful. I prayed quite earnestly this morning that t
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Stepping westward 1901-1902; aet. 82-83 (search)
ted, Parson Stone being ill. The President made his response quite audibly. The Chanler children looked lovely, and the baby as dear as a baby can look. His godfather gave him a beautiful silver bowl lined with gold. I gave a silver porringer, Maud a rattle with silver bells; lunch followed. President Roosevelt took me in to the table and seated me on his right. This was a very distinguished honor. The conversation was rather literary. The President admires Emerson's poems, and also Longfellow and Sienkiewicz. He paid me the compliment of saying that Kipling alone had understood the meaning of my Battle Hymn, and that he admired him therefor. Wister proposed the baby's health, and I recited a quatrain which came to me early this morning. Here it is:--Roses are the gift of God, Laurels are the gift of fame; Add the beauty of thy life To the glory of thy name. I said, Two lines for the President and two for the baby ; the two first naturally for the President. As I sat wai
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